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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (24 total).

University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine. n.d.. Persons with disabilities presentation series. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, 1 web resource.

Annotation: This series of webinars for oral health professionals focuses on helping them become competent to and comfortable with providing oral health care for individuals with special health care needs (SHCN). The series provides information about assisting individuals with SHCN with optimizing their oral health; gaining skills for preventing oral disease and maintaining patients’ oral health without use of sedation or general anesthesia; and increasing oral health professionals’ knowledge about how to improve quality of life for individuals with SHCN and their families.

Contact: University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, Robert Schattner Center, 240 South 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6030, Web Site: https://www.dental.upenn.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Dentistry, Dentists, Medical technology, Oral health, Professional education, Training

Children's Partnership and the Pacific Center for Special Care. 2015. The virtual dental home. Santa Monico, CA: Children's Partnership, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Virtual Dental Home, a system that combines technological advances with work force innovations to bring oral health care to children where they already spend time, such as at schools and Head Start sites. Topics include barriers to accessing oral health care among children in California, how the system works, client satisfaction and quality of care, and economic benefits. The document also provides information about efforts to advance state policy changes and educate stakeholders about how they can implement the Virtual Dental Home in their communities.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 811 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1000, Los Angeles, CA 90017, Telephone: (213) 341-1222 Fax: (213) 293-1483 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Children, Dental care, Medical home, Model programs, Oral health, Policy development, Statewide planning, Sustainability, Systems development, Technology, Work force

United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2014. Best practices guide for implementation of newborn exclusive breast milk feeding in electronic health records. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 40 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides an overview of the factors, programs, and regulations supporting exclusive breast milk feeding data documentation, measurement, and reporting in electronic health records (EHRs) during the birth of a newborn. The guide is designed for software designers, analysts, developers, and implementers, as well as clinicians implementing standards-based EHRs. Topics include the health potential of exclusive breast milk feeding; regulations driving quality measurement using health information technology; implementation guidance including scope, assumptions, and key concepts; breast milk feeding reporting and/or designation programs; future areas of development; and breast milk and breastfeeding resources.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Data collection, Electronic communications, Measures, Medical records, Model programs, Quality assurance, Recordkeeping, Records management, Resources for professionals, Standards, Technology transfer

ECRI Institute. 2013. AHRQ healthcare horizon scanning system: Potential high-impact interventions report–Priority Area 12: Pregnancy, including preterm birth. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Healthcare Horizon Scanning System as a systematic process to identify and monitor target technologies and innovations in health care and to create an inventory of target technologies that have the highest potential for impact on clinical care, the health care system, patient outcomes, and costs. It also describes its role as a tool for the public to identify and find information on new health care technologies and interventions. This report discusses two topics, the Preconception Care System for improving health outcomes in pregnancy (Gabby) and the use of vending machine dispensers for emergency oral contraceptive (Plan B One-Step) to prevent pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive use, Medical technology, Medical technology, Oral contraception, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Research methodology

Turner-Lee N, Smedley B, Miller J. 2012. Minorities, mobile broadband and the management of chronic diseases. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an April 2011 roundtable discussion to consider the potential of mobile broadband technologies, telemedicine, and online health applications to help communities of color and healthcare providers access information and tools to more effectively prevent, diagnose, and manage chronic diseases such as asthma, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. It examines the potential of mobile broadband technologies to help address disparities in availability and access to health care in unserved/underserved areas. Topics include the cost of chronic disease in the health care system, innovative mobile resources, and challenges of mobile broadband. It discusses policy recommendations in the areas of expanding the availability of primary care physicians, ensuring universal access to mobile broadband, reforming regulatory barriers to treatment, creating incentives for physicians to use broadband technologies and electronic health records, as well as promoting consumer education and awareness.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health care delivery, Medical technology, Minorities, Telemedicine, Underserved communities

National Network for Oral Health Access, Health Information Technology Workgroup. 2012. Guide to the future: A strategic roadmap to achieving meaningful use objectives and selecting an integrated electronic dental record (EDR) electronic health record (EHR) system to improve oral health access and outcomes. Denver, CO: National Network for Oral Health Access, 93 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides guidance for safety net oral health programs on selecting and implementing an electronic record system. Contents include information on using certified electronic health record (EHR) technologies in ways that can be measured (meaningful use) and steps for implementing an EHR system that integrates electronic dental records (EDRs). An EDR/EHR selection tool is included. Appendices provide vendor rating charts and evaluations.

Contact: National Network for Oral Health Access, 181 East 56th Avenue, Suite 501, Denver, CO 80216, Telephone: (866) 316-4995 Fax: (866) 316-4995 E-mail: info@nnoha.org Web Site: http://www.nnoha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Integrated information systems, Measures, Medical records, Oral health, Program improvement, Technology

DeFrancis Sun B, Pickett OK. 2012. Health information technology (Health IT): Professional resource brief. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. State options for enhancing health information exchange for MCH systems. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This resource describes what states have done to improve their systems for sharing data through widespread adoption of electronic records, including population screening, programs for infants and children with special health care needs, and registry and data programs.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Information systems, MCH programs, Medical records, Program improvement, State programs, Technology

National Center for Medical Home Implementation and Child Health Informatics Center. 2011. Improving the medical home through the use of health information technology: A fact sheet for health care professionals. Elk Grove, IL: National Center for Medical Home Implementation and Child Health Informatics Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the relationship between health information technology (HIT) and the medical home, considerations for practices, translating HIT functionality to medical home implementation, and HIT resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health, Information, Medical home, Service coordination, Technology

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2010–. United States Health Information Knowledgebase. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, multiple items.

Annotation: This registry and repository contains health-care-related metadata, specifications, and standards. Topics include health information technology standards, common formats, meaningful use, all-payer claims, and children's electronic health record format. Draft quality measures that are available to the public for feedback are also included.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Claims, Data, Databases, Diffusion of innovation, Federal initiatives, Integrated information sources, Measures, Medical records, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Registries, Resources for professionals, Standards, Technology transfer, Third party payers

University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children. 2010. Guidelines for nurses working in home care. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document is excerpted from the "Home Care Program Policy Manual" of the University of Illinois at Chicago Division of Specialized Care for Children. It describes some of the differences and difficulties experienced by families and nurses working together in the home care of technology assisted children. It also provides information to help nurses establish and maintain a professional working relationship within a home environment. General guidelines are presented to help nurses prepare mentally for the experience of home care. More specific guidelines are also included that discuss establishing appropriate relationships with the child, the parents, and the siblings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children, 3135 Old Jacksonville Road, Springfield, IL 62704-6488, Telephone: (217) 558-2350 Secondary Telephone: (800) 322-3722 Fax: (217) 558-0773 E-mail: dssc@uic.edu Web Site: http://dscc.uic.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Home care services, Medically fragile children, Nurses, Parents, Technology dependence

Children's Health Fund. 2009. Children's health care: Health information technology and electronic health records. New York, NY: Children's Health Fund, 2 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This brief addresses the connection between high-quality comprehensive health care and readily available and usable information in the form of electronic health records (EHRs). The brief discusses the experience of the New York Children's Health Project (CHF), which serves many homeless families. CHF responded to this challenge by developing its first-generation EHR system in 1989 and subsequently developed more sophisticated systems. The brief also includes recommendations.

Contact: Children's Health Fund, 215 West 125th Street, Suite 301 , New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 535-9400 Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health services, Homeless persons, Information systems, Medical records, Technology

HRSA Office of Health Information Technology and Quality. 2009. Health IT for children toolbox. [Rockville, MD]: HRSA Office of Health Information Technology and Quality,

Annotation: This toolbox provides resources for the children's health community to integrate information technology (IT) into promoting pediatric health and well-being. The toolbox provides a general introduction to the current health information technology (IT) landscape, a specific view of health IT for children within that landscape, and an overview of current federal and state initiatives on health IT for children. Additional modules address developing electronic health records, involving family members, building a medical home for children, facilitating public insurance, improving quality, cross sector planning, developing pediatric- and child health-friendly public health records, and pediatric oral health and health IT.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family centered care, Health insurance, Information systems, Medical home, Medical records, Oral health, Pediatrics, Quality assurance, Technology

Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative. 2009. Meaningful connections: A resource guide for using health IT to support the patient centered medical home. Washington, D.C.: Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative, 42 pp.

The Children's Partnership. 2008. Meeting the health care needs of California's children: The role of telemedicine (2nd ed.). Santa Monica, CA: The Children's Partnership, 16 pp. (Digital opportunity for youth, no. 3)

Annotation: This issue brief informs leaders and the public of how telemedicine can address the health care needs of children in California, particularly children from families with low incomes who live in medically underserved areas. Contents include (1) an overview of the benefits of telemedicine for children and families, health systems, and communities; (2) the challenges associated with the adoption of telemedicine; and (3) recommendations for ensuring that telemedicine reaches its potential in meeting the health care needs of California's most vulnerable children. The use of telemedicine is illustrated in the following areas: emergency and critical care, oral health, vision screening, mental health, telepharmacy, children with special health care needs, home health care, child abuse evaluations, supporting families, disease management, language translation, supporting rural health professionals and providing medical education, and caring for children where they are located.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 811 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1000, Los Angeles, CA 90017, Telephone: (213) 341-1222 Fax: (213) 293-1483 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Child health, Health care delivery, Information networks, Medical technology, Oral health, Primary care, Telemedicine, Underserved communities

National Network for Oral Health Access, Health Information Technology (HIT) Committee and Kushinka AS. 2008. Guide to the future: Using HIT to improve oral health access and outcomes. [Denver, CO]: National Network for Oral Health Access, 56 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses the benefits of integrating health information technology (HIT) in health center programs, the unmet needs of the market segment, and resources for dental directors considering HIT implementation. Topics include technology adoption in the health center oral health setting; technology systems that serve the oral health market; challenges to technology implementation among oral health professionals in health centers; and factors proven to yield positive results for organizations selecting, implementing, optimizing, and sustaining HIT. A resource guide for dental directors and staff to use in their system selection process is included.

Contact: National Network for Oral Health Access, 181 East 56th Avenue, Suite 501, Denver, CO 80216, Telephone: (866) 316-4995 Fax: (866) 316-4995 E-mail: info@nnoha.org Web Site: http://www.nnoha.org $22; also available at no charge from the website.

Keywords: Integrated information systems, Medical records, Oral health, Program improvement, Technology

Amara R, Bodenhorn K, Cain M, Carlson R, Chambers J, Cypress D, Dempsey H, Falcon R, Garces R, Garrett, J, Gasper D, Haynes Sanstad K, Holt M, Kirsch S, Kuehn N, Kuiper H, Kyrouz E, Mittman R, Morrison E, Morrison I, Nilsen G, Pascali M, Robertson A, Runde D, Sarasohn-Kahn J, Schmid G, Wilson C, Yu K, and Institute for the Future. 2003. Health and health care 2010: The forecast, the challenge. [2nd ed.]. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 400 pp.

Annotation: This book singles out the trends most likely to influence the course of Americans' health and the state of the American health care delivery system between now and 2010. Chapter 1 presents an overview of a 10-year forecast in health and health care including three different scenarios describing emerging visions of health care in this country. An additional 11 chapters have the following headings: health and the health care forecast, demographic trends and the burden of disease, health care's demand side, health insurance, health care providers, health care workforce, medical technologies, information technologies, health care consumers, public health services, health behaviors, and expanded perspective on health. Statistics are provided in numerous charts and graphs throughout the publication. It contains a glossary and index, and concludes with a flow-chart illustrating the three scenarios presented in the first chapter.

Contact: Jossey-Bass Publishers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.JosseyBass.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7879-5974-X.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural diversity, Demography, Health behaviors, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Health statistics, Medical technology, Population dynamics, Population growth, Provider participation, Public health services, Socioeconomic factors, Trends

Algus K, Popper B, Wainstock L. 2003. Family Voices in SCHIP telemedicine report: Bridges, not boundaries—The value and use of telemedicine for children/youth with special health care needs. Boston, MA: Family Voices, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report provides findings from a survey of telemedicine providers and parents regarding the potential, the pitfalls, the realities and the hopes for telemedicine's role in providing medical care to children and youth with special health care needs. Appendices include a checklist for families to use if telemedicine is offered to them, a family satisfaction questionnaire offered as a working model for programs to use with families experiencing telemedicine visits, a list of contacts of those who responded to the questionnaire, and a list of resources. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, P.O. Box 37188, Albuquerque, NM 87176, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.familyvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Families, Health personnel, Medical technology, Patient satisfaction, Questionnaires, Surveys, Telecommunications, Telemedicine

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation and National Committee for Quality Health Care. 2003. Accelerating quality improvement in health care: Strategies to speed the diffusion of evidence-based innovations—Proceedings from a conference. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the proceedings of a conference convened to explore (1) why the slow diffusion of many health care and medical innovations persists and (2) how to accelerate the adoption of clinical technologies and health service innovations that have been shown to improve the quality and/or cost effectiveness of health care. The report, which includes an executive summary, focuses on the following issues: (1) devices and drugs: obstacles to timely product uptake, (2) innovation in the hospital and at the bedside, (3) innovation in public health, prevention, and disease management, (4) the imperative of information technology and e-health, and (5) better quality through informed consumer choice. The report also includes synopses of three papers commissioned for the conference. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The appendix lists conference faculty with contact information.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Consumers, Cost effectiveness, Diffusion of innovation, Disease management, Disease prevention, Health care, Hospitals, Information systems, Internet, Management, Medical devices, Medical research, Prescription drugs, Prevention, Public health, Technology

Porter SM, Bierle T, Dietrich LL, Palfrey JS. 1991. Children assisted by medical technology in educational settings: Resources for training. Boston, MA: Children's Hospital, Project School Care, 60 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides school nurses a listing of resources and training materials to help them care for children with special health needs. It indicates changes in the care of children assisted by medical technology since 1980 including demographic and medical trends, changes in federal legislation which provide for the education of these children, and lists of resource materials and organizations. The booklet organizes the resource materials topically: manuals, universal precautions, nutrition and medication, elimination, respiratory, equipment, training community personnel, financing, and transportation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Medically fragile children, Resources for professionals, School health services, Special education, Technology dependence

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.