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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services for Children Program; Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center; Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response; National Library of Medicine, Disaster Information Management Research Center. 2014-. Health resources on children in disasters and emergencies. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: This website is a compendium of resources related to medical and public health issues of children in disasters and emergencies. Contents include links to journal articles and other documents and materials that may be useful in preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery activities. Resources are national or international in scope. Topics include natural disasters; chemical and biological agents, radiologicals and nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); psychological and behavioral health; and special topics such as children with disabilities, school and care providers, hospital preparedness, resilience, and pandemics.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Communicable diseases, Databases, Disaster planning, Disasters, Emergencies, Emergency medical services for children, Hospitals, International health, Mental health, Resilience, Resources for professionals, Schools, Special health care needs

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program. 2014. Dental health guide for school nurses. Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 11 pp.

Annotation: This booklet is designed to aid school nurses in the effective treatment of minor oral health emergencies. Topics include dental first aid supplies; inflamed or irritated gum tissue, fever blisters, cold sores, and canker sores; toothache; prolonged or recurrent bleeding after an extraction; broken or displaced tooth; traumatic avulsion (tooth knocked out of socket); possible jaw dislocation or fracture; orthodontic problems and emergencies; objects wedged between teeth; lacerated lip or tongue; and tooth eruption pain. Information about the eruption and shedding of primary (baby) teeth and primary and permanent dentition eruption tables are also provided.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Oral Health Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6010 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services, First aid, Nursing, Oral health, School age children, Schools

De Angelis CD , ed. 1999. The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine curriculum for the twenty-first century. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 248 pp.

Annotation: This book describes how the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine changed its curriculum from a traditional, faculty-oriented model to a student-oriented model based on adult learning strategies. It is intended to help the reader gain practical knowledge of the process as well as knowledge of the specific components of the curriculum. It provides a brief history of undergraduate medical education at Johns Hopkins, an overview of the process of change, and descriptions of individual components of the curriculum. Chapters discuss the teaching of basic sciences; interrelated courses based on organ systems; a four-year longitudinal Physician and Society course; a new curriculum for medical informatics and support services for computer-based education; student placements in the offices of community-based private practitioners; curriculum reform in the clinical years; and early evaluations of the general curriculum, specific courses, and the students.

Contact: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2715 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4363, Telephone: (410) 516-6900 Secondary Telephone: (800) 537-5487 Fax: (410) 516-6998 E-mail: kk@press.jhu.edu Web Site: http://www.press.jhu.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8018-5977-8 (cloth), ISBN 0-8018-6350-3 (paper).

Keywords: Bioethics, Community based services, Curricula, Evaluation, History, Information systems, Interdisciplinary approach, Learning, Medical education, Medical schools, Models, Primary care, Reform

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration; National Institutes of Health; U.S. Public Health Service, Office on Women's Health. 1997. Women's health in the medical school curriculum: Report of a survey and recommendations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration; National Institutes of Health, 404 pp.

Annotation: This report examines how women's health and gender-related issues are taught in the basic and clinical sciences. It presents the core components of a women's health curriculum and highlights examples collected of women's health curricular activities in medical schools, residency training, and professional organization programs. Included are the analytical results of surveys conducted by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine.

Keywords: Curricula, Medical schools, National surveys, Research, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1996. Maternal and Child Health Graduate Medical Education in Obstetrics/ Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Family Practice in Historically/Predominantly Black Medical Schools. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 33 pp.

Annotation: This document explains how to apply for a federal grant for graduate medical education in obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, and family practice in historically or predominantly black medical schools. It describes the authority and purpose for the grants; program elements and requirements; special considerations; the review process and criteria; the application process; form, project plan, progress report, and abstract instructions; and reporting requirements. Appendices have additional instructions and sample reports. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Applications, Black colleges, Blacks, Family medicine, Federal grants, Gynecology, MCH training programs, Medical education, Medical schools, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Program descriptions, SPRANS

De Geyndt W, Sprague LM. 1969. Differential patterns in comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: Health department, medical school, teaching hospital . Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 16 pp. (Comment series no: 9-11 (24))

Annotation: This paper, presented at the 97th annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Philadelphia, focuses on the authorization in the Children and Youth Program to appropriate federal funds directly to medical schools and teaching hospitals as well as to health departments. This is part of a series to document and asses the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Hospitals, Interagency cooperation, Medical schools, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on School Health. 1966. Report of the Committee on School Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Evanston, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses school health policy, provides background information on school health topics, and outlines some techniques used by school health services. The report was prepared for physicians but will also be of interest to educators. Topics discussed include the relationship between schools and health services; the school health education medical specialty; health screening of students; special school health needs of adolescents; children with special health needs and schools; academic performance and school attendance; physical fitness and sports medicine; the health of school personnel; and cooperation and communication between physicians and educators.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Confidentiality, Education, Emergency medical services for children, Health policy, Health promotion, Health screening, Health screening, Human development, Medical education, Occupational safety and health, Physical fitness, School attendance, School failure, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School personnel, Schools, Sports medicine, Tests

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.