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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (67 total).

Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department. n.d.. Using scientific evidence to improve information practice: The research policy statement of the Medical Library Association. Chicago, IL: Medical Library Association, Professional Development Department, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement expresses the vision of the Medical Library Association (MLA) of research as a foundation for excellence in health information practice, for new and expanded roles for health sciences librarians, and for attracting excellent people to the profession. It also affirms the association's commitment to collaborate with other organizations to increase support for health sciences librarians' research activities. This policy does not include a laundry list of research topics, but seeks to provide an intellectual basis and rationale for the role of research in support of professional practice. The future role of health sciences librarians, the role that current health sciences librarians must play in achieving those, and the role of MLA in this are described. A proposed action plan outlines future directions for MLA under the headings education, research, support, funding, recognition, and measurement.

Contact: Medical Library Association, 225 East Wacker Place, Suite 650, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-9094 Fax: (312) 419-8950 E-mail: info@mlahq.org Web Site: http://www.mlanet.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Collaboration, Health sciences libraries, Librarians, Medical Library Association, Research

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

National Institutes of Health. [2015]. NIH-wide strategic plan: Fiscal years 2016-2020. Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 46 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan describes how the National Institutes of Health (NIH) plans to achieve four objectives: (1) advance opportunities in biomedical research; (2) foster innovation by setting NIH priorities; (3) enhance scientific stewardship; and (4) excel as a federal science agency by managing for results.

Keywords: Federal agencies, Medical research, National Institutes of Health, Strategic plans

Genetic Alliance. 2013-. Genes in life. Washington, DC: Genetic Alliance,

Annotation: This resource provides information about genetics and health. Topics include how genes work; genes, lifestyle, and environment; collecting family health history; genetic disease information; advocacy and support groups; financial planning; talking to families and health professionals; compensation for genetic testing; whole genome sequencing; screening vs. testing; disease research; patient privacy; clinical trials; and biobanks. Features include Ask the Experts, frequently asked questions, and a blog. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Counseling, Family health, Genetics, Information sources, Medical history, Research, Screening, Testing

Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2013. Emergency department pediatric performance measures toolbox. Silver Spring, MD: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolbox features the work of Evaline Alessandrini, M.D., and her emergency medical care for children (EMSC)- targeted project about defining quality performance measures for EMSC. This project seeks to improve pediatric emergency care through the consensus identification of pediatric emergency care performance measures and associated elements of documentation. The toolbox provides links to resources for health professionals, database searches, example practices, and resource for families and caregivers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Collaboration, Emergency medical services for children, Health services, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, Research

ECRI Institute. 2013. AHRQ healthcare horizon scanning system: Potential high-impact interventions report–Priority Area 12: Pregnancy, including preterm birth. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Healthcare Horizon Scanning System as a systematic process to identify and monitor target technologies and innovations in health care and to create an inventory of target technologies that have the highest potential for impact on clinical care, the health care system, patient outcomes, and costs. It also describes its role as a tool for the public to identify and find information on new health care technologies and interventions. This report discusses two topics, the Preconception Care System for improving health outcomes in pregnancy (Gabby) and the use of vending machine dispensers for emergency oral contraceptive (Plan B One-Step) to prevent pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive use, Medical technology, Medical technology, Oral contraception, Pregnancy, Preterm birth, Research methodology

Peikes D, Zutshi A, Genevro J, Smith K, Parchman M, Meyers D. 2012. Early evidence on the patient-centered medical home. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 50 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a systematic review of the early evidence on effectiveness of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). The evaluation examines the effects of PCMH on (1) quality of care, costs (or hospital use or emergency department use), and patient and caregiver experience; or (2) health care professional experience. A formal rating system is used to identify interventions that were evaluated and synthesize the evidence from these evaluations. The report also provides guidance to inform current efforts and structure future evaluations to maximize learning.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost benefit analysis, Evaluation, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research

Meyers D, Peikes D, Lundquist DS, Genevro J. 2011. Improving evaluations of the medical home. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 4 pp. (Patient-Centered Medical Home Decisionmaker Brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights six key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the patient-centered medical home model. Contents include the rationale and examples in practice for each recommendation. The brief accompanies a white paper on this topic, which is also available from the website.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0091.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

Peikes D, Dale S, Lundquist E, Genevro J, Meyers D. 2011. Building the evidence base for the medical home: What sample and sample size do studies need?. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 46 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides suggestions for generating evidence on the effects of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The paper focuses on quantitative evaluations designed to measure effectiveness. Topics include accounting for clustering inherent in effectiveness research, determining what effect sizes a given study can expect to detect, approximating the number of clients and practices required to detect policy-relevant yet achievable effects, and varying the outcomes and types of clients included in the analyses to improve a study's ability to detect true effects. An accompanying brief highlights key recommendations for evaluators and those considering commissioning evaluations of the PCMH model.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 11-0100-EF.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Evidence based health care, Medical home, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Quantitative evaluation, Research design, Research methodology, Treatment effectiveness

Muir Gray JA, Shepperd S. 2010. Evidence-based healthcare and public health: How to make decisions about health services and public health. (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone, Inc., 426 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this book is to help health service professionals make evidence-based decisions in the field of health care for groups of patients or particular populations. The book is aimed at decision and policy makers. The main topics covered are finding and evaluating evidence, developing the capacity of individuals and organizations to use evidence, and getting research into practice. Chapters offer information on the definition of evidence-based health care, on "doing the right things right, " on making decisions about health services, searching for and evaluating evidence, assessing the outcomes of research, and organizational and individual management development. Appendices list sources for published research, unpublished research, searching on-line, appraising research, and implementing decisions.

Keywords: Assessment, Decision making, Evidence based medicine, Health services, Medical research

National Advisory Mental Health Council's Workgroup. 2010. From discovery to cure: Accelerating the development of new and personalized interventions for mental illnesses. [Bethesda, MD]: National Institute of Mental Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to help meet its strategic objective to "develop new and better interventions that incorporate the diverse needs and circumstances of people with mental illnesses." The report is the product of a workgroup created by the National Advisory Mental Health Council (NAMHC) in response to the need for preemptive and personalized interventions for mental disorders that are tailored to the individual and prevent the damaging consequences of these illnesses. It advises NIMH to develop new interventions based on emerging research in pathophysiology, emphasizing a strategic focus on harnessing discoveries in genetics and neuroscience. Included in the report are a description of the workgroup's background and process; an assessment of changing paradigms and evolving science; and tactical recommendations that include new approaches to science and a call for shared efforts among stakeholders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Guidelines, Medical research, Mental health, Mental health agencies, Science, Strategic plans, mental disorders

Genetic Alliance. 2010. Community centered family health history collaboration across communities: How do you make research community-specific and universally-relevant?. Washington, DC: Genetic Alliance, 58 pp. (Monograph series no. 4)

Annotation: This monograph evaluates the effectiveness of the family health history toolkit titled Does It Run in the Family? developed to help individuals create customized booklets where families can collect health history information to be shared with relatives and health professionals. The monograph focuses on the usability and utility of the toolkit, reporting on the research conducted to assess its effectiveness, the steps taken within various communities to integrate the toolkit, and the key findings from the evaluation process. The monograph reports on the toolkit's accessibility and sustainability (including its ability to be customized and integrated into other programs and services); discusses the collaborative process used as part of the demonstration project; and addresses some of the challenges encountered. A copy of the family health history questionnaire (together with instructions for its use), a healthcare card for providers, and additional resources are included.

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family health, Collaboration, Communities, Consumer education materials, Demonstration programs, Evaluation, Health promotion, Medical history, Models, Research

National Institute of Mental Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and NIH Center for Information Technology. 2010. National database for autism research. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health,

Annotation: This website provides a secure bioinformatics platform for scientific collaboration and data-sharing for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) investigators. Content includes the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR), comprising genetic, imaging, and phenotypic data from multiple sources. Additional content includes information about data sharing, standards, tools, policy and procedures, and training.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Collaboration, Data linkage, Medical research, Online databases, Resources for professionals, Web sites

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center. 2010. A century of progress: Milestones in sickle cell disease research and care. Bethesda, MD: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides an overview of sickle cell disease, explaining what it is and how research has led to advances in its treatment during the past century. The brochure also describes how the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- part of the National Institutes of Health -- has not only funded sickle cell research but has conducted large clinical trials and sponsored workshops and meetings to guide the research agenda. The back of the brochure is a time line displaying events related to sickle cell disease beginning in 1910 when it was first described by Chicago Physician James B. Herrick.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood and lymphatic disease, Genetics, History, Medical research, Sickle cell disease

Fraker M, Mazza AM. 2010. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 93 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the presentations and discussions at a workshop on direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing held in Washington, DC, on August 31 and September 1, 2009. The report discusses (1) scientific and ethical foundations for DTC genetic testing, (2) personal and social issues related to DTC genetic testing, (3) research and medical issues in the context of DTC genetic testing, (4) the impact on health care and public health, and (5) an overview of the current legislative and regulatory framework governing genetic testing in the United States. Each section includes a series of questions for further discussion. The report concludes with a holistic examination of areas for further study.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $28.75; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-16216-6.

Keywords: Genetic screening, Health care, Legislation, Medical ethics, Public health, Regulations, Research

VanLandeghem K, Brach K. 2009. Impact of primary care case management (PCCM) implementation in Medicaid and SCHIP. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 6 pp. (CHIRI issue brief no. 8)

Annotation: This issue brief summarizes findings from a Child Health Insurance Research Initiative study of the impact of implementing primary care case management (PCCM) systems in Alabama and Georgia. PCCM systems aim to increase the use of well-child and primary care in physicians' offices while decreasing use of specialty care and emergency departments. Policy implications of what was learned from the study are included.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 09-0020.

Keywords: Alabama, Case management, Emergency medical services, Georgia, Health care systems, Primary care, Public policy, Research, State programs, Well child care

Qureshi N, Wilson B, Santaguida P, Little J, Carroll J, Allanson J, Raina P. 2009. Family history and improving health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca 320 pp. (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 186)

Annotation: This review evaluates (1) key elements of family history (FH) that usefully predict subsequent diseases, (2) the accuracy of reporting FH, (3) the impact of FH-based risk information on the uptake of preventive interventions, (4) the potential for harms associated with collecting cancer FH, (5) factors that facilitate or hinder the collection of FH, and (6) future directions. Methods, results, and conclusions are provided.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 09-E016.

Keywords: Cancer, Families, Interventions, Medical history, Prevention, Research, Risk factors

Zuckerman S, Merrell K, Berenson R, Gans D, Underwood W, Williams A, Erickson S, Hammons T. 2009. Incremental cost estimates for the patient-centered medical home. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that focused on estimating overall medical home costs with practice data that capture not only the costs but also the degree to which the practice meets the criteria of a medical home, according to a widely used medical-home-assessment tool.Topics covered include available estimates of medical home costs and estimating the incremental cost of the medical home.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Medical home, Research, Statistical data

Corneli H. [2008]. Dexamethasone for brochiolitis RCT: A PECARN Project—Final comprehensive report. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah Division of Pediatric Medicine, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 11 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a 2005-2007 project to assess the effectiveness of oral dexamethasone for acute moderate-to-severe outpatient infant bronchiolitis in a multi-center randomized, controlled trial (RCT). Contents include an introduction into the nature of the research problem, a review of the literature, a discussion of the study design and methods and detailed findings, and a discussion and interpretation of findings. A list of products produced during the project is provided along with references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medicine, Final reports, Infant health, MCH research, Pediatric pulmonary care

Perrin JM. 2008. Coordinating care for children with chronic conditions in primary care [final report]. Boston, MA: MGH [MassGeneral Hospital for Children] Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to evaluate the statewide Massachusetts Medical Home Project (MMHP) in comparison with standard community practice without care coordinators in place. The MMHP placed state-employed care coordinators in local primary care practice to improve care and outcomes for children with chronic health conditions and their families and to help the practices evolve into medical homes. Report contents include a description of the research problem; the purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation; and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature; study design and methods; findings; and discussion on interpretation of the findings. Tables are included with data obtained during the investigation on demographics, comparisons, and differences. References are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Final reports, MCH research, Medical home, Service coordination, Service integration

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.