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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (123 total).

Federal Security Agency, Social Security Administration, Children's Bureau. n.d.. Infant and childhood mortality, maternal mortality, natality: 1947 chart book of trend data for the United States; profile data for each state. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 93 pp.

Building U.S. Capacity to Review and Prevent Maternal Deaths. 2018. Report from nine maternal mortality review committees. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, 74 pp.

Annotation: This report provides data from maternal mortality review committees in nine states on pregnancy-related maternal deaths and reports recommendations from the committees on actions that might have changed the course of events leading to the deaths. It also discusses these emerging issues: maternal mental health conditions, severe maternal morbidity, and incorporating equity.

Contact: Building U.S. Capacity to Review and Prevent Maternal Deaths, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Maternal mortality, Pregnancy, State surveys

Isbell M, Simpson I. 2015. Saving lives, protecting futures: Progress report on the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. New York, NY: Every Woman Every Child, 109 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, an international initiative to promote partnership, coordinate, and coherence in efforts to prevent women's and children's deaths and improve lives, advances made over the past five years, and how they have been achieved. Topics include progress in reducing maternal and child mortality and morbidity, catalyzing innovation to improve women's and children's health, accountability for results for women and children, mobilizing essential resources for women's and children's health, lessons learned, and building on gains to date in the post-2015 era.

Contact: Every Woman Every Child, United Nations Foundation, 801 Second Avenue, Suite 900, New York, NY 10017, Web Site: http://www.everywomaneverychild.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, International health, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Prevention, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, Strategic plans

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Connecting the dots to improve birth outcomes: Key considerations and recommendations from a national meeting. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 32 pp.

World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health. 2014. The PMNCH 2014 accountability report: Tracking financial commitments to the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, Partnership for Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, 56 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.).

Highsmith K. [2013]. National Maternal Health Initiative: A comprehensive collaborative strategy. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 16 slides.

Annotation: This presentation provides information about a U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MHCB) national maternal health initiative. The presentation focuses on maternal morbidity in the United States. Topic include numbers of deaths, causes of death, risk factors; economic burden, MCHB's vision, the initiative's goals and priority areas, and guiding principles for a national health strategy.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Maternal death, Maternal health, Maternal mortality, National initiatives, Prevention, Racial factors, Risk factors, Statistical data

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020. 2013. Healthy People 2020 leading health indicator webinar: Maternal, infant, and child health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2020, 1 video (ca. 35 min.).

Annotation: This webinar discusses Healthy People 2020 indicators for maternal, infant, and child health; specifically lowering rates of infant mortality and preterm or premature birth.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prematurity, Preterm birth

Reid D. 2013. Using the Affordable Care Act and other opportunities to address maternal mortality. Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence that women of color disproportionately experience pregnancy or childbirth-related complications that ultimately end in their death, in particular African American women (regardless of their income level). Topics also include documenting maternal mortality to determine maternity performance measures and best practices and how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care and other health care financing opportunities can assist in improving maternal health,

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Childbirth, Health care financing, Maternal mortality, Medicaid, Minority health, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Pregnancy complications, Pregnant women, Women's health

Thomas T. 2013. Maternal health from 1985-2013: Hopeful progress and enduring challenges. Chicago, IL: MacArthur Foundation, 17 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a brief history of the maternal health field, including estimates of the number of women who die in developing countries from complications of pregnancy, abortion attempts, and childbirth; global policies and initiatives; and the manifesto for maternal health post-2015. It also discusses trends in funding for international maternal health and the future of the maternal health field.

Contact: MacArthur Foundation, 140 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60603, Web Site: http://www.macfound.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, History, International health, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality

Maternal and Child Health Consortium of Chester County. [2012]. Healthy Start: Reducing health disparities–Improving birth outcomes in Chester County 1996-2009. Chester PA: Maternal and Child Health Consortium of Chester County, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of the Chester County, Pennsylvania, Healthy Start program on participating mothers and children during the period 1996-2009. Topics include the evaluation methodology, efforts to reach women in most need, conditions impacting infant health, and efforts to prevent poor birth outcomes and provide access to health care. Data and estimated costs savings are included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Consortium of Chester County, 30 West Barnard Street, Suite1, P.O. Box 2747, West Chester, PA 19380-0990, Telephone: (610) 344-5370 Fax: (610) 344-5279 E-mail: mchc@ccmchc.org Web Site: http://www.ccmchc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coalitions, Community based services, Cost effectiveness, Data, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Maternal health, Pennsylvania, Program evaluation

National Healthy Start Association. (2012). Saving our nation's babies: The impact of the federal Healthy Start Initiative (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 59 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the history of the Healthy Start Initiative for the past 20 years and provides program descriptions for the 105 projects across the country. Topics highlighted include leadership training, regional roundtables, infant mortality, racism/health disparities, and fatherhood involvement.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Healthy Start, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions

National Center for Chronic Disease prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Maternal Health Initiative. (2012). CDC/AMCHP assessment of maternal mortality review processes in the United States. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a brief review of the Centers for Disease Control/Association of Maternal and Child Health Program's assessment of maternal mortality review process. The fact sheet provides background and presents a summary of methods and results.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Legislation, Maternal death, Maternal mortality, Racial factors, Research, Statistical data

Moehling CM, Thomasson MA. 2012. Saving babies: The contribution of Sheppard-Towner to the decline in infant mortality in the 1920s. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 34 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17996)

Annotation: This paper examines a program that provided matching grants to states to fund maternal and infant care education initiatives and the reduction in infant mortality that occurred in the United States during the early twentieth century. The goal of the paper is to disentangle the effect of the Promotion of the Welfare and Hygiene of Maternity and Infancy Act (more commonly known as the Sheppard-Towner Act) on infant mortality from its preexisting downward trend. The authors assess the impact of Sheppard-Towner grants and public health expenditure measures on infant mortality as well as the impact of specific state activities such as nurse visits, conferences, literature, public health centers, and classes for midwives. Background information on infant mortality and the Children's Bureau, a description of the data and methods, results, and references are included.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after registration.

Keywords: Federal programs, History, Infant care, Infant mortality, Legislation, Maternal health services, Public health education, Research, State initiatives

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Eliminating disparities in perinatal health technical assistance workshop. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (90 min.).

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast January 10, 2012, provides an orientation to the application process and a review of the Healthy Start program requirements, as well as the Healthy Start role in addressing disparities in perinatal health and reducing infant death rates. Additional topics include key measures and the Healthy Start logic model, core interventions, perinatal and postpartum depression, interconception care for women, evaluation and performance measures, and coordination with state Title V agencies.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Maternal health services, Perinatal health, Preconception care, Pregnant women, Program descriptions, Program evaluation

Drayton V, Walker D. 2012. National Healthy Start evaluation: Update on evaluation activities, SACIM meeting, July 10, 2012. Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, 49 slides.

Annotation: These slides summarize findings from a survey of 104 Healthy Start sites that reports on 2010 data. The presentation discusses the logic model and evaluation questions; findings related to core and expanded service components, systems components, and perceived outcomes; and next steps and recommendations.

Contact: Abt Associates Inc., 4800 Montgomery Lane, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 913-0500 Fax: (301) 652-3618 Web Site: http://www.abtassociates.com/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Maternal health, National surveys, Program evaluation

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. [2011]. Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality [web site]. [Rockville,MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This website describes the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (SACIM) and its roles and actions in advising the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on HHS programs that are directed at reducing infant mortality and improving the health status of pregnant women and infants. The site also contains advice from the SACIM on how best to coordinate federal, state, local and private efforts that address the health and social problems that have an impact on infant mortality. Site contents include the latest (2009-2011) charter and a list of current members, information about the SACIM, and an archive of correspondence to the HHS Secretary. In addition an archive of Committee meetings (from 2004-2011) is provided with agenda, minutes, and presentations.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Advisory committees, Child health, Infant death, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Prevention

New York Academy of Medicine. 2011. Maternal mortality in New York: A call to action—Findings and priority action steps. New York, NY: New York Academy of Medicine, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents findings from a meeting convened by the New York Academy of Medicine on June 18, 2010, focused on reducing maternal deaths in New York. The paper also presents priorities for action and recommended action steps.

Contact: New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, Telephone: (212) 822-7200 Fax: (212) 722-7650 Web Site: http://www.nyam.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Maternal death, Maternal mortality, New York, Prevention, State surveys

Save the Children. 2011. Champions for children: State of the world's mothers 2011. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 42 pp.

Annotation: This annual index analyzes health, education, and economic conditions for women and children in 164 countries. Women's health index categories include risk of maternal death, births attended by skilled health personnel, modern contraception use, and life expectancy. Child health index categories include under-5 mortality rate, underweight status, and access to safe water.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Statistics, Child health, Children, Developing countries, International health, Maternal health, Mortality rates, Mothers, Nutritional status

American Congress on Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Maternal Mortality Review Committee. 2011. Maternal mortality review meeting and special interest group. Washington, DC: American Congress on Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Maternal Mortality Review Committee,

Annotation: This website provides presentations by members of maternal mortality review committees, who describe international, national, and state data and activities on this topic.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Committees, Maternal mortality, Obstetrics, Public health, State programs

Grantmakers in Health. 2011. Shedding light on maternal mortality. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses maternal mortality in the United States, including its rising rate in recent years and the key disparities in rates based on race/ethnicity and socioeconomic factors. The brief provides statistics and background information, discusses the challenges and possible strategies for reducing maternal mortality rates, and provides examples of methods to help funders improve and promote the health of women and children before, during, and after pregnancy and childbirth.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Maternal health, Maternal mortality, Mortality rates, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.