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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Depression during and after pregnancy: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for families on finding help and learning more about depression during and after pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Depression, Electronic publications, Families, Maternal mental health, Postpartum depression, Pregnancy, Pregnant women

Vericker TC. 2015. Maternal depression associated with less healthy dietary behaviors in young children . Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief investigates the relationship between maternal depression and eating habits earlier in childhood, when food preferences are developing. Topics include the prevalence and severity of maternal depression; characteristics of mothers, households, and kindergarten-age children; and associations between mothers' depressive symptoms and their kindergarten-age children's eating practices. Contents include data, measures, analyses, and discussion and conclusions.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Food consumption, Food habits, Maternal mental health, Nutrition, Young children

Bolin JN, Bellamy G, Ferdinand AO, Kash B, Helduser, eds. 2015. Rural Healthy People 2020: A companion document to Healthy People 2020–Volume one. College Station, TX: Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health, Southwest Rural Health Research Center, 135 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a guide and benchmark on the current state of rural health priorities and disparities and serves as a roadmap for updating federal and state leaders on rural health priorities identified through the national Rural Healthy People 2020 survey. Volume one addresses each of the ten top-ranked rural health priorities and includes reviews of relevant literature, updated for those topics previously identified as priorities in Rural Healthy People 2010, and models for practice that rural practitioners can use to support community and regional programs. Topics include access to quality health services, nutrition and weight status, the burden of diabetes, mental health and mental disorders, substance abuse trends, heart disease and stroke, physical activity, older adults, updates and challenges in maternal and child health, and tobacco use in rural America.

Contact: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Department of Health Policy and Management, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1266, Telephone: (979) 862-4238 Fax: (979) 458-0656 Web Site: http://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-4951-5242-9.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child health, Community health services, Diabetes, Health care disparities, Health objectives, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, Heart diseases, Literature reviews, Maternal health, Mental health, National initiatives, Nutrition, Physical activity, Rural populations, Strokes, Substance abuse, Tobacco use

Every Child Succeeds. 2014. Moving beyond depression: Greater success for new mothers in home visiting. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a comprehensive, focused, and integrated approach to identifying and treating depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs. The program involves three phases instituted over two years: (1) on-site training of home visitors in identification of maternal depression and role in the program, (2) training of therapists in Cincinnati in in-home cognitive behavioral therapy, and (3) ongoing training and support of therapists. Information about maternal depression, the program's research base, a training calendar, and additional resources about postpartum depression and postpartum support are included.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Depression, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Therapeutic programs, Training

Johnson K, Ammerman RT, Van Ginkel JB. 2014. Moving beyond depression: An effective program to treat maternal depression in home visiting–Opportunities for states. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a program that uses in-home cognitive behavioral therapy to treat maternal depression as an added component for home visiting programs. Topics include the impact of maternal depression on women, children, and families; the program's research and results, return on investment, design, and implementation; and opportunities and potential roles for states and home visiting programs.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Depression, Financing, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, State programs, Therapeutic programs, Training

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Depression in mothers: More than the blues–A toolkit for family service providers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information and strategies for family health providers to use in working with mothers who may be depressed. It includes facts about depression; screening tools for more serious depression; and referrals, resources, and handouts for mothers who are depressed.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Depression, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Screening

Howell E, Golden O, Beardslee W. 2013. Emerging opportunities for addressing maternal depression under Medicaid. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 9 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the problem of maternal depression and its impact not only on the low-income mother but on her children. Topics include effective screening and treatment, Medicaid's potential role, issues outlined in the Affordable Care Act, challenges to providing services to mothers with depression enrolled in Medicaid, and emerging opportunities to address the challenges. A summary, recommendations, and references are also included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Maternal mental health, Medicaid, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Screening

Duke Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Efficacy and safety of screening for postpartum depression. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 215 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 106)

Annotation: This report describes the results of a 2004-2012 literature search that evaluated the performance of screening instruments for postpartum depression, potential benefits and harms of screening, and impact on appropriate postscreening actions. Report contents include an introduction to postpartum depression and its adverse outcomes, screening, clinical and socioeconomic factors affecting risk; chapters on the study methods and results; a discussion of the findings; and conclusions and references. Appendices provide further detail into how the study was performed.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication No. 13-EHC064-EF.

Keywords: Literature reviews, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Research methodology, Screening

Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Sontag-Padilla LM, Lovejoy SL, Firth R, Pincus HA. 2013. Transforming systems for parental depression and early childhood developmental delays: Findings and lessons learned from the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative. [Santa Monica, CA]: Rand Corporation, 166 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an evaluation of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative of the Allegheny County Medical and Child Health Care Collaborative, an initiative to implement improvements to the local system of maternal and child health care. Report contents include an introduction to the initiative and its focus on maternal depression in low-income populations, system challenges, and a review of the need for a cross-system response in Allegheny County. Additional chapters discuss the methods for studying the initiative's framework, implementation, strategies, and evaluation; results and assessments on services, systems, and individuals; a discussion of lessons learned and limitations; as well as conclusions, recommendations, and next steps. Appendices include assessments, tools, outcome measure linkages, and reference studies.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-7857-5.

Keywords: Case studies, Families, Family child relations, Health services delivery, Maternal mental health, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression, Program evaluation, Screening

Sontag-Padilla L, Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Lovejoy SL, Firth R. 2013. Maternal depression: Implications for systems serving mother and child. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights evidence on the impact of maternal depression on the mother and child as it relates to the public-sector systems that serve them and discusses potential short- and long-term cost implications. This brief describes a supplemental component of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children initiative implemented in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which successfully implements depression screening in early intervention, develops cross-system referral processes, engages caregivers in services, and increases local capacity for providing relationship-based services by addressing many of the barriers identified in earlier stages of the collaborative’s work.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early interventions services, Local initiatives, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression

Herbst CM, Tekin E. 2012. Child care subsidies, maternal well-being, and child-parent interactions: Evidence from three nationally representative datasets. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 49 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17774)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of child care subsidy receipt on maternal health and quality of parent-child interactions. The paper introduces the issue and discusses data and measures, empirical implementation, and results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Financing, Infants, Low income groups, Maternal health, Mental health, Parent child relations, Programs, Research, Young children

Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies. 2011. Reducing effects of postpartum depression: Provider education and maternal empowerment. [Alexandria, VA]: Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies, 1 video (ca. 50 min.).

Annotation: This archived webinar, broadcast July 13, 2011, discusses issues surrounding postpartum and perinatal depression (PPD) and the impact on the health and well-being of mothers and their infant's neurobiological development. Topics include how underreported or underdiagnosed PPD is; varying levels of severity including healthy rebound, "baby blues", diagnosed perinatal depression, postpartum bi-polar disorder, and the rare postpartum psychosis. Topics also include maternal stresses due to lacks of sleep/exhaustion, depression stigma, previous psychological or medical histories, post-traumatic stress from unexpected C-section or adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, partner or violence abuse, and financial stresses. Social risk factors for depression such as multiple births or feeling of isolation are also discussed. Resources are discussed including model state programs, online resources, proposed legislation, and the importance of establishing local postpartum depression networks and support services.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Early childhood development, Hotlines, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent support services, Parenting, Perinatal care, Postnatal care, Postpartum depression, Resources for professionals

Postpartum Support, International. [2010]. I wish I had known. Portland, OR: Postpartum Support, International, 1 poster (11" x 17").

Annotation: This poster states that the number one complication of childbirth is depression. It describes symptoms and gives a contact phone number. The file has two pages, one with a box where local information can be added and one without the box. It has been created to raise awareness of pregnancy and postpartum mental health and for distribution in community and healthcare settings. It is available in both English and Spanish.

Contact: Postpartum Support, International, 6706 SW 54th Avenue , Portland, OR 97219, Telephone: (503) 894-9453 Secondary Telephone: (800) 944-4773 Fax: (503) 894-9452 E-mail: support@postpartum.net Web Site: http://www.postpartum.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Maternal mental health, Mothers, Posters, Postpartum depression, Pregnant women, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. 2010. Maternal depression can undermine the development of young children. Cambridge, MA: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 23 pp. (Working paper no. 8)

Annotation: This working paper summarizes recent research on the harmful effects of chronic and severe maternal depression on families and children. It examines why the failure to address the consequences of depression for large numbers of vulnerable young children presents a missed opportunity to support children and families in a way that could support the well being of society as a whole. The paper discusses neuroscience and developmental research, as well as program evaluation findings related to maternal depression. The paper also describes (1) common misconceptions concerning the effectiveness of treatment for depressed mothers and the effects of maternal depression on children; (2) the gap between science-based evidence of the problem and the lack of studies conducted in the United States that evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to prevent postpartum depression (PPD); and (3) the implications for the evidence-based findings on policy and programs.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child mental health, Maternal depression, Maternal mental health, Mental health services, Postpartum depression, Psychosocial factors, Women's health, Young children

Santoro K, Peabody H. 2010. Identifying and treating maternal depression: Strategies and considerations for health plans. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation, 27 pp. (NIHCM Foundation issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief reviews the prevalence of maternal depression, health risks of untreated depression, and economic consequences of depression and its associated health complications. Additionally, the brief provides recommendations and tools for health care providers to identify and treat maternal depression and shares opportunities for health plans to promote a comprehensive approach to early identification and treatment of maternal depression.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Maternal health, Maternal mental health, Mental health services, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Pregnant women, Screening, Treatment

Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services. 2010. Texas home visiting needs assessment for the Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. [Austin, TX]: Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services, 83 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides information about home visiting needs in Texas. The document includes background information about the state and discusses the process for conducting the assessment, the statewide and at-risk communities data report, the quality and capacity of existing home visiting initiatives in Texas, partner agency infrastructure for early childhood services, existing home visiting initiatives, and the quality and capacity of existing substance abuse treatment and counseling services in Texas.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7111 Secondary Telephone: (512) 458-7708 Fax: (512) 458-7750 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Families, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Mental health services, Services, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse treatment services, Texas, Needs assessment, Young children

Public Broadcasting System, This Emotional Life . 2010. Early moments matter: Small steps, long-lasting effects. [Seattle, WA]: Vulcan Productions, 7 items.

Annotation: This toolkit for parents, families and child services professionals introduces ways in which parents and caregivers can help their infants build secure attachments, examines challenges encountered in the process, and provides suggestions on how challenges may be overcome. The toolkit includes a 30 minute DVD, a quick-reference guide answering attachment and parenting questions, three informational brochures and tips printed on a magnet and a bookmark. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Early Moments Matter, Web Site: http://www.earlymomentsmatter.org $10, plus $2.50 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bonding, DVDs, Family life education, Fathers, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mothers, Multimedia, Newborn infants, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Spanish language materials

Le H. [2009]. Preventing postpartum depression in high-risk pregnant Latinas: Effects on maternal and infant health—Final comprehensive report. [Washington, DC: Department of Psychology, George Washington University], 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to study low-income Latinas at high-risk for developing postpartum depression to provide cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at teaching women mood regulation skills to prevent the onset of major depressive episodes and at improving mother-infant relationships. Contents include a description of the nature of the research, the project's purpose and scope, and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature; study design and methods; details of the findings; and a discussion and interpretation of the findings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention services, Final reports, Hispanic Americans, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Postpartum depression, Postpartum women, Prevention services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. [2009]. Women's mental health: What it means to you. Washington, DC: Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet discusses the unique mental health needs of women and girls and provides tips on recognizing signs of mental problems and where to seek help. Topics include the continuing stigma related to mental illness or disorders, adolescent suicide prevention, eating disorders, pregnancy and postpartum depression, menopause, trauma, violence, and abuse. A resource guide lists agencies and organizations as well as helplines.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Abuse, Adolescent mental health, Brochures, Consumer education materials, Eating disorders, Hotlines, Maternal mental health, Mental disorders, Postpartum depression, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Violence, Women's health

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2009]. Taking care of mom: Nurturing self as well as baby—Healthcare provider's guide. [Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau], 2 pp. (Bright futures for women's health and wellness)

Annotation: This fact sheet directed to healthcare providers describes why a caregiver should talk to perinatal women about emotional wellness, how to create an environment where it's okay to talk about emotions, and lists questions to use about emotions, support, and integrating the baby into their lives.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Maternal mental health, Mothers, Perinatal services, Postpartum depression, Pregnant women, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.