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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

Buckley SJ. 2015. Hormonal physiology of childbearing: Evidence and implications for women, babies, and maternity care. Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 225 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes evidence about innate hormonally-mediated processes in women and fetuses/newborns during childbearing, and possible impacts of common maternity care practices and interventions on these processes, focusing on four hormone systems that are consequential for childbearing. Topics include overarching themes and scope, physiologic onset of labor and scheduled birth, oxytocin, beta-endorphins, epinephrine-norepinephrine and related stress hormones, and prolactin. Recommendations to promote, support, and protect physiologic childbearing and resources for learning and improving practice are included.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Hormones, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal health services, Model programs, Program improvement, Psychophysiology

Buckley SJ. 2015. Pathway to a healthy birth: How to help your hormones do their wonderful work. Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 17 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for women defines birth hormones and describes what they do, what can get inthe way of how birth hormones work, how medical tests and other treatments can affect birth hormones, how maternity care practices can support birth hormones, and what women can do to make sure their care will support birth hormones. Birth stories, tips for finding a health care professional and a place to give birth, and questions to ask are included.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Consumer education materials, Hormones, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal health services, Perinatal health, Psychophysiology

Buckley SJ. 2015. Hormonal physiology of childbearing: Fact sheets on core topics for maternity care practices. Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 17 pp.

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2005. Caffeine in pregnancy. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, (Quick reference and fact sheets)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the possible effects of caffeine consumption during pregnancy and on birth outcomes. It describes what food and beverages contain caffeine and in what amounts, medication that can contain caffeine, how caffeine affects the body, how caffeine may affect fertility and miscarriage, how caffeine may affect newborns and whether it enters breastmilk. References are provided.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Caffeine, Consumer education materials, Maternal fetal exchange, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome

Mattison DR, Wilson S, Coussens C, Gilbert D, eds.; Board on Health Sciences Policy, Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. 2003. The role of environmental hazards in premature birth: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 127 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a workshop convened on October 2-3, 2001, to look at issues surrounding the impact of environmental exposure on the fetus in the uterus, risks of premature birth, as well as child health and well-being throughout life. In addition the role of social and behavioral factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, drug use, alcohol use, and tobacco smoking is discussed. Chapters include: (1) preterm birth and its consequences, (2) labor and delivery, (3) preterm birth and a brief summary of biological pathways, (4) preterm birth and gene-environment interactions, (5) the social implications of preterm birth, and (6) future directions for research. The book also contains abstracts of 18 relevant articles and references. Three appendices contain the workshop agenda, a list of speakers and panelists, and a list of workshop participants.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09065-2.

Keywords: Childbirth, Conferences, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Genes, Labor, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal health, Maternal mental health, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Research, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Waisbren S. 2003. Maternal PKU resource mothers program: A clinical trial—[Final report]. Boston, MA: Children's Hospital Boston, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report evaluates a randomized controlled study using a specially designed home visitation program including resource mothers to help women with phenylketonuria (PKU) attain metabolic control prior to and throughout pregnancy in order to prevent the adverse effects of maternal PKU. Report sections include the nature of the research problem, goals and objectives, the study methodology, an evaluation, and a review of the results/outcomes. Also included is a list of publications and products, an outline of the dissemination/utilization of study results, and references. Tables provide additional information mothers' background variables, blood measurement variables, diet variables, and treatment plan assessment schedules. a review of the literature; an outline of the study design and methods; a presentation of findings; and a discussion of findings and recommendations for policy implications and further research. Also provided are a list of products developed and references.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (617) 355-4686 Contact Fax: (617) 355-7346 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Fetal development, Final reports, Genetic disorders, Intervention, MCH Research, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal phenylketonuria, Nutrition, Pregnant women, Resource mothers

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.