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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (40 total).

Driscoll AK, Osterman MJK. 2018. Maternal characteristics of prenatal WIC receipt in the United States, 2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief; no. 298)

Annotation: This report describes prenatal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) receipt in the United States in 2016 by state and by maternal age, race and Hispanic origin, and education. For each topic, key points are provided, and bar graphs illustrate statistical information.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Educational factors, Hispanic Americans, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition programs, Pregnant women, Prenatal nutriton, Racial factors, Statistical data, WIC program

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of MCH Workforce Development. [2014]. Division of MCH Workforce Development: 2012–2020 strategic plan. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, 8 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan includes goals, strategies, activities and performance measures to support efforts of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Division of MCH Workforce Development to assure that all children, youth, and families will live and thrive in healthy communities served by a quality workforce that helps assure their health and well-being.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, Strategic plans, Training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Work force

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2011. MCHB presents: Legacy of a leader. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This web site contains archived presentations from Dr. Peter Van Dyck, former director of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The presentations, given on July 13, 20, and 27 2011, cover public service pathways as a career choice; the history of maternal and child health (MCH), and lessons in leadership. The presentations are all part of MCHB's Legacy of a Leader series.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child Health, Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, History, Leadership, Maternal health, Public health

Fajnzylber E, Hotz VJ, Sanders SG. 2010. An economic model of amniocentesis choice. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 41 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16306)

Annotation: This paper examines the logic behind the typical recommendation by medical practitioners that only pregnant women over the age of 35 be tested for Down syndrome and other genetic disorders using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) since these tests can cause miscarriage. The authors argue that such logic is incomplete, since the cost of such testing rises with age, just as the benefit does: While undergoing an amniocentesis always entails the risk of miscarriage of a healthy fetus, these costs are lower at early ages, because there is a higher probability of being able to replace a miscarried fetus with a healthy birth at a later age. In this paper, the authors present an economic model of amniocentesis choice to explore this tradeoff.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Amniocentesis, Chorionic villi sampling, Cost effectiveness, Economic factors, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Guidelines, Maternal age, Prenatal screening

National Association of County and City Health Officials. [2009]. Maternal, child, and adolescent health toolkit. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials,

Annotation: This online toolkit contains downloadable resources highlighting programs and practices to help local health departments with their work related to maternal and child health and adolescent health. The toolkit is divided into the following categories: programs, publications, toolbox, public health advocacy, press room, and membership. Users may also request help (including help finding a tool), bookmark tools, and submit tools.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, City agencies, Community agencies, Internet, MCH, Maternal health, Programs, Public health, Resource materials, World Wide Web

MacDorman MF, Kirmeyer S. 2009. The challenge of fetal mortality. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 8 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 16)

Annotation: This report examines data from the National Vital Statistics System for fetal death of 20 weeks gestation or more. Topics include the impact of fetal mortality on families, recent trends, differences among racial and ethnic groups, rates among twins or other multiple pregnancies, relationship between fetal mortality and maternal age, and fetal mortality rates by number of previous pregnancies.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Fetal death, Fetal mortality, Maternal age, Multiple pregnancy, National surveys, Population surveillance, Pregnancy loss, Racial factors, Statistical data, Statistics

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2009. Maternal and child health. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet summarizes the key facts, history, maternal and child health services block grant program, and Healthy Start program of the Human Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Mathews TJ, Hamilton BE. 2009. Delayed childbearing: More women are having their first child later in life. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 21)

Annotation: This data brief provides information about changes over time in the ages at which women have their first child. The brief addresses the following questions: (1) are first-time mothers older?, (2) does the average age of first-time mothers differ by race and Hispanic origin?, and (3) how does the United States compare with other countries in average age at first birth?

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. (PHS) 2009-1209.

Keywords: Delayed childbearing, Hispanic Americans, Maternal age, Racial factors, Trends

Fine A, Kotelchuck M, Adess N, Pies C. 2009. A new agenda for MCH policy and programs: Integrating a life course perspective. Martinez, CA: Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief emphasizes the importance of integrating a life course perspective, which emphasizes the importance of health across the the human life span, into maternal and child health (MCH). It describes how the life course model focuses on the importance of intervention during critical periods in time, and how the environment and other factors have a cumulative impact on health. The brief then describes how the MCH life course model can be transformed into concrete policies and programs. Initial ideas for developing a life course framework, along with starting strategies, are included.

Contact: Contra Costa Health Services, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 957-5403 Fax: (925) 957-5409 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Child health, Health care reform, Human development, Life course, MCH health, Maternal health, Models, Policy, Program development, Program improvement, Risk factors

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Cunningham S, Fahey S, Thompson B, eds. 2008. Promoting a healthy weight in women of reproductive age: Experiences and lessons learned from eight state/local health department teams—From the CityMatch/AMCHP Action Learning Collaborative. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, 37 pp.

Annotation: This monograph details the experiences, strategies developed, and lessons learned of an action learning collaborative convened by the Association of Maternal and Child Health programs and CityMatch, from October 2006 through February 2008, to promote healthy weight in women of reproductive age. For each of the eight programs featured, the report gives a team description, impact of collaborative, project description, lessons learned, and recommendations.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Community programs, Maternal age, Model programs, Obesity, Women's health

Library of Congress, John W. Kluge Center. 2007. Justice, not pity: Julia Lathrop, First Chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, John W. Kluge Center,

Annotation: This audio recording and transcript features Dr. Cecilia Tichi, Chair of Modern Culture in the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress presenting a history of Julia Lathrop, the first chief of the U.S. Children's Bureau. The talk -- titled Justice, Not Pity, is taken from Lathrop's quote, The justice of today is born of yesterday's pity -- highlights Lathrop's upbringing and educational background; her interest in social democracy and reform; and her work at Hull House -- a settlement house in Chicago. The recording and transcript include descriptions of numerous slides used during the presentation that took place in September 2007.

Contact: Library of Congress, Government Documents Section, 101 Independence Avenue at First Street, S.E., Washington, DC 20540, Telephone: (202) 707-5000 Fax: (202) 707-0380 E-mail: http://www.loc.gov/rr/aslalib/ Web Site: http://www.loc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Federal agencies, History, Maternal health, Reform, Social change

Terry-Humen E, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2005. Playing catch-up: How children born to teen mothers fare. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This paper, part of the Putting What Works to Work project, explores the complex relationship between the age at which a woman has a child and how her child fares. Two primary areas are discussed: (1) what is the magnitude of differences on measures of development between children born to adolescent mothers aged 17 and younger and children born to older women; and (2) what differences between the kindergarten children remain after taking into account characteristics of the child, the mother, and the household. Topics addressed include differences in child, family, and mother's background characteristics by age of mother; differences among children by age of mother at first birth; cognition and knowledge and language and communications differences in children born to adolescent mothers. The report is divided into the following sections: summary, introduction, key findings, research to date, data, sample, measures, methods, results, discussion, conclusion, and literature cited. Statistical information is provided in charts and tables throughout the paper.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-053-2.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Infant health, Language development, Maternal age, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

Hutchins VL. 2001. Maternal and child health at the millennium: Looking back, moving forward. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 62 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides an overview of the federal Maternal and Child Health (MCH) program's evolution in consultation, technical assistance, policy development and dissemination, and data collection and analysis, from the establishment of the Children's Bureau in 1912 to the present. The publication uses four selected areas—newborn screening, mental retardation, heart disease, and school health/health of school age children—to illustrate how the MCH program development principles have incorporated scientific and technological advances into promoting the health of the nation's children and families. The publication discusses the problems that the MCH program will face in the future, including unresolved problems from the 20th century and new problems. References are included in the document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Fathers, Health promotion, Healthy People 2010, Heart diseases, History, Infants, MCH programs, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Mental retardation, Neonatal screening, Parents, Pregnant women, Program development, School age children, School health, Social Security Act, Title V, Title V programs

DC Action for Children. 1999-. What's in it for kids?: A budget and program analysis for the District of Columbia FY 20__. Washington, DC: DC Action for Children, annual.

Annotation: This report discusses the fiscal year budget for the District of Columbia, emphasizing the funding available for programs to benefit children, youth, and families. The report begins with background information including a historical timeline on the budget process. It explains how to advocate for children, youth, and families. Subsequent chapters provide detailed information on programs and budget in the following areas: welfare and other government benefit programs, child welfare, early childhood development, juvenile delinquency and crime prevention, homelessness, recreation, maternal and child health, mental health, the Children and Youth Investment Fund, and the Tobacco Settlement Trust Fund. A glossary, a list of city government officials and agencies, and a list of other important addresses and phone numbers are included at the end.

Contact: DC Action for Children, 1616 P Street, N.W., Suite 420, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 234-9404 Fax: (202) 234-9108 E-mail: dcaction@dckids.org Web Site: http://www.dcactionforchildren.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Advocacy, Budgets, Budgets, Child health, Child welfare, Children, City agencies, District of Columbia, Early childhood development, Families, Homelessness, Juvenile delinquency, Maternal health, Mental health, Prevention, Program evaluation, Recreation, Tobacco, Welfare programs, Youth

Roberts RN, Akers AL, Behl D. 1999. Opening doors through state interagency coordinating councils: A guide for families, communities, and states. Logan, UT: Early Intervention Research Institute, Utah State University, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Opening Doors project. It was funded from 1993 through 1997 by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau to define, synthesize, and disseminate recommended strategies for integrating services for children and families eligible under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Research was conducted in Utah, Washington, Maine, Hawaii, Missouri, and Florida. The report begins by defining service integration and proceeds to explain how it works at the family level, the community level, the state level, and the federal level. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Families, Family support services, Federal agencies, Florida, Hawaii, Health services delivery, Interagency cooperation, Intervention, Maine, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Missouri, National surveys, State agencies, Statistics, Transition planning, Utah, Washington

National Center for Health Statistics. 1999. Maternal and child health statistics: Russian Federation and the United States, selected years—1985-95. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 140 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 5, International vital and health statistics reports; no. 10)

Annotation: This report focuses on maternal and child health statistics for the Russian Federation and the United States. The report covers a broad range of health measures including the following: prenatal care, pregnancy complications, abortion, method of delivery, birth order, births to unmarried women, births by age of mother, infant mortality, maternal mortality, child mortality by age group, immunizations, morbidity in the Russian Federation, hospitalization in the United States, and communicable diseases. The report also includes a discussion of data quality issues to assist in understanding limitations in the accuracy, coverage, or comparability of the information presented. A background section provides a brief description of the organization of each country's health care system, as well as an outline of national guidelines for the provision of maternal and child health care. The report also contains 24 tables covering population size, prenatal and obstetrical care, abortions, natality data, breastfeeding practices, mortality data including causes of death, immunization rates, communicable diseases, and other morbidity measures. The report provides additional detail, when available, for key subgroups of each population: In the Russian Federation, data are presented for urban and rural regions; in the United States, for black and white racial groups. In the final section of the report, a glossary of terms provides additional detail on differences in definitions between the two countries.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: PHS 99-1486.

Keywords: Abortion, Child health, Child health services, Child mortality, Childbirth, Communicable diseases, Health statistics, Hospitalization, Immunization programs, Infant health services, Infant mortality, Maternal age, Maternal health, Maternal health services, Maternal mortality, Morbidity, Pregnancy complications, Premarital pregnancy, Prenatal care, Racial factors, Rural population, Russia, United States, Urban population, Vital statistics

Henderson A, Champlin S, Evaschwick W, eds. 1998. Promoting teen health: Linking schools, health organizations, and community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 272 pp.

Annotation: This book describes the status of adolescent health and provides techniques for promoting healthy behaviors through school and community linkages. The topics discussed are adolescent health, preventing unintentional adolescent injury, physical activity and fitness, nutrition for adolescents, tobacco use and adolescents, drug abuse, adolescents and alcohol use, recognizing and preventing sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents, HIV, AIDS, adolescent pregnancy and early childbearing, adolescent mental health, youth violence, family and dating violence, health education programs, peer education, postponing sexual involvement, and several community adolescent health programs.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Hardcover: $48.00; Paperback: $22.95. Document Number: ISBN 07619-0275-9.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent mental health, Adolescent nutrition, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol abuse, Drug abuse, HIV, Health education, Injury prevention, Maternal age, Peer education, Physical fitness, Public health programs, Sexually transmitted diseases, Tobacco use, Violence

Koenig DG, Peck G, eds. 1996. The road to community partnerships: Highlights of the 1995 Urban Maternal and Child Health Leadership Conference. Boston, MA: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 164 pp.

Lamberty G, Papai J, Kessel W, eds. 1996. Proceedings of the fourth national Title V Maternal and Child Health Research Priorities Conference. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 137 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings report the results of a conference held in 1994 to advise the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) on its research agenda and priorities for its applied research program through the year 2000 and beyond. The proceedings describe the conference, list topics of proposed research, and include papers from constituency groups including MCHB staff, state MCH programs, teachers of MCH, and representatives from research disciplines and family groups. Topics covered include women's and men's health, perinatal health, infancy, preschool children, school-age children, adolescents, and family and community. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescents, Child health, Infants, Maternal health, Preschool children, Reproductive health, Research, School age children, Women's health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.