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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (24 total).

Staton J, Ooms T. 2012. "Something important is going on here!": Making connections between marriage, relationship quality and health—Implications for research and healthcare systems, programs and policies: Wingspread Conference Proceedings 2012. Littleton, CO: National Healthy Marriage Resource Center, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on the proceedings of the conference, Making Connections: Effects of Marriage and Couple Relationships on the Heath of Infants, Adolescents and Older Adults, held on October 20-22, 2008, in Racine, Wisconsin. Topics included key research lessons and recommendations, new directions, opportunities to improve health care, and first steps toward a more couple- and family-centered health care system.

Contact: National Healthy Marriage Resource Center, 1950 West Littleton Boulevard #306, Littleton, CO 80120, Telephone: (303) 830-0400 E-mail: info@healthymarriageinfo.org Web Site: http://www.healthymarriageinfo.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Conference proceedings, Families, Health care systems, Infant health, Marriage, Older adults, Relationships, Research

Murphey D. 2012. The Child Trends DataBank: A resource for indicators of child well-being . Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a webinar presented by Child Trends on July 12, 2012, that focused on the Child Trends DataBank, which is a resource for indicators of child well-being. The report discusses Child Trends and offers information about the DataBank, ways to use it, and information it includes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child development, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Early childhood development, Education, Families, Fatherhood, Marriage, Mental health, Parenting skills, Poverty, Program, Programs, Public policy, Resource materials, Statistical data, Trends

Wildsmith E, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J. 2011. Childbearing outside of marriage: Estimates and trends in the United States. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief examines trends in nonmarital childbearing in the United States between 1970 and 2009. Drawing on birth data from the National Vital Statistics Reports and Child Trends' analysis of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), the brief describes the characteristics of women who have children outside of marriage and examines how patterns in nonmarital childbearing have changed over time. Statistics compare childbearing rates among unmarried women according to age, race, ethnicity, and other factors. The brief also examines trends in cohabitation patterns among unmarried parents. Details about the data sources used in the research include a description of the most common measures of nonmarital childbearing.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth rates, Families, Marriage, Single parents, Statistics, Trends

Logan C, Moore K, Manlove J, Mincieli L, Cottingham S. 2007. Conceptualizing a "Strong Start": Antecedents of positive child outcomes at birth and into early childhood. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 7 pp. (Research brief no. 2007-10)

Annotation: This research brief identifies and examines factors associated with children being born and growing up healthy (with a strong start). The brief identifies several assumptions that guided the research on conceptualizing a strong start, discusses conceptualizing a strong start (including factors such as mother's physical and mental health status, mother's receipt of health-related services, mother's health related behaviors, and other factors), discusses the review of available research on the topic, and provides conclusions. References are included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Economic factors, Infant health, Marriage, Mental health, Pregnancy, Reproductive health, Women's health

Mincieli L, Manlove J, McGarrett M, Moore,K, Ryan S. 2007. The relationship context of births outside of marriage: The rise of cohabitation. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 4 pp. (Research brief no. 2007-13)

Annotation: This research brief examines the rise in nonmarital childbearing and the number of births to cohabiting couples, as well as the characteristics of women who have births within cohabiting relationships, compared with women who have births within marriage or births outside of any union.The brief discusses trends in nonmarital childbearing, the cohabitation content, and demographic snapshots. A discussion and policy implications are included, as well as endnotes and references.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Educational factors, Families, Marriage, Single parents, Trends

Whitehead BD, Pearson M. 2006. Making a love connection: Teen relationships, pregnancy, and marriage. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines steps toward the goal of developing strategies that provide adolescents with a positive vision and expectations for their lives and thus help prevent adolescent pregnancy. The steps outlined in the report include (1) teach adolescents about healthy relationships and healthy marriage; (2) teach adolescents about how to promote the achievement of their dreams and desires for their future family and work lives; (3) provide a knowledge base, practical skills, and social support to help adolescents successfully navigate the transition from adolescence to adulthood; and (4) engage parents as first teachers. The report is divided into the following main sections: (1) facing the cultural challenge (which deals with the differences in the world of adolescents today vs. the one in which their parents grew up); (2) confronting the knowledge deficit about relationships; (3) losing the connection between sex, marriage, and parenthood; and (4) what we need to do. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Families, Goals, Marriage, Parents, Prevention, Relationships

Crosse M, Peterson K, DeMots K, Dooley P, Friday K, Klazkin J, Shefrin A. 2006. Abstinence education: Efforts to assess the accuracy and effectiveness of federally funded programs. Washingtonm, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the oversight of federally funded abstinence-until-marriage education programs. The report provides information on (1) efforts by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and states to assess the scientific accuracy of materials used in these programs and (2) efforts by DHHS, states, and researchers to assess the effectiveness of these programs. The report also includes results in brief, background, conclusions, and recommendations for executive action. The report includes four appendices: (1) the Health Resources and Services Administration's technical assistance contract for abstinence education, (2) method for identifying and reviewing research studies, (3) comments from DHHS, and (4) Government Accountability Office contact and staff acknowledgments. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Marriage, Abstinence, Federal programs, Financing, Program evaluation, Sexuality education

Kempner ME. 2006. Toward a sexually healthy America: Abstinence-only-until-marriage programs that try to keep our youth "scared chaste". New York, NY: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 70 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a review conducted by the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States of nine of the most widely available abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula designed for junior and senior high school students that emphasize the negative consequences of premarital sexual activity, portray sexual behavior as universally dangerous, and deny young people information about pregnancy and disease prevention. The report discusses the educational philosophy of these curricula and their scope and context. Topics covered include sexuality and abstinence, religion and morality, fear and shame, sexual pressure, sexual arousal, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV and AIDS, condoms and contraception, marriage and family structure, gender, sexual orientation, pregnancy options and abortion, teaching methods, curricula strong point, and the future of sexuality education. Brief reviews of the curricula are provided. A list of abstinence-education curricula that do not include messages of fear or shame is included. The report includes references.

Contact: Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, 90 John Street Suite 402, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 819-9770 Fax: (212) 819-9776 E-mail: siecus@siecus.org Web Site: http://www.siecus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Abortion, Abstinence, Adolescent sexuality, Condoms, Contraception, Curricula, Families, HIV, Marriage, Moral values, Pregnancy, Prevention, Religion, Sexual identity, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases

Osborne C, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J . 2005. Young children's behavioral problems in married and cohabitating families. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 4 pp. (Fragile families research brief; no. 33)

Annotation: This research brief examines the behavior of children born to married and cohabiting parents in stable unions to determine whether marital status at birth is associated with behavior problems at age 3. If differences in child behavior exist between stably married and cohabiting families, the authors examine what proportion of problems is due to differences in parents' demographic characteristics, economic resources, relationship quality, health, and health behaviors. The authors also compare children born to cohabiting parents who marry after the child's birth with children born to cohabiting parents who remain in cohabiting relationships. The brief presents data and methods, results, and a conclusion and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Demography, Economic factors, Families, Health, Health behavior, Marriage, Parents, Relationships, Single parents, Young children

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2005. Marriage and child wellbeing. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 175 pp. (The future of children; v. 15, no. 2, Fall 2005)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on the debate over marriage and its relationship to child well-being and provides readers with some facts and a context to help them understand that debate. The issue includes nine articles, each by a different author. The articles deal with the following topics: (1) an overview of the issue, (2) marriage as a public issue, (3) American marriage in the early 21st century, (4) the impact of family structure on family income, (5) the impact of family formation change on the cognitive, social, and emotional well-being of the next generation, (6) gay marriage, same-sex parenting, and America's children, (7) barriers to marriage among the disadvantaged, (8) healthy marriage programs: learning what works, and (9) the hefty penalty on marriage facing many households with children.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development, Children, Economic factors, Families, Family income, Homosexuality, Marital status, Marriage, Parents

Child Trends and National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2004. Science says: The relationship between teenage motherhood and marriage. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 9 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 11)

Annotation: This report explores the relationship between adolescent motherhood and marriage and how being born to an adolescent mother affects a child's life. Issues discussed in the report include overall trends in adolescent births and marriage, the marital status of adolescent mothers, adolescent mothers' marital hopes and realities, and the consequences of remaining an unmarried mother. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with endnotes.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Children, Marriage, Poverty, Single mothers, Trends

Fertig AR, McLanahan SS, Garfinkel I. 2003. Child support enforcement and domestic violence among non-cohabitating couples. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 53 pp. (Working paper no. 02-17-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses state-level data constructed from the Current Population Survey matched onto the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of approximately 5, 000 children, including 3, 700 children born to unmarried parents, to address the question of how child support enforcement policies relate to domestic violence. The paper includes a theoretical model of how child support enforcement influences cohabitation, marriage, child support orders, and violence. The data used is described, and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child support, Children, Data, Domestic violence, Families, Low income groups, Marriage, Models, Research, Single parents

Dion MR, Devaney B, McConnell S, Ford M, Hill H, Winston P. 2003. Helping unwed parents build strong and healthy marriages: A conceptual framework for interventions—Final report. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research, 149 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a conceptual framework for interventions that would address the needs and circumstances of unmarried parents and provide relationship skills instruction and knowledge for those who would choose to form and sustain healthy marriages. The report builds on research indicating that the period around the time of a child's birth may represent a critical moment for strengthening couple bonds. The report contains the following sections: (1) family formation in low-income populations, (2) approaches to marriage and relationship education, (3) program interventions to improve marriageability, (4) policy options to encourage marriage and family formation, and (5) program development and implementation issues, and (6) evaluating interventions to strengthen families. The report also includes three appendices: a list of expert panel members, a summary of program characteristics, and site visit summaries. Some information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report also includes a list of references.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth, Community programs, Families, Infants, Interventions, Low income groups, Marriage, Public policy, Relationships, Single parents

Dion MR, Devaney B. 2003. Strengthening relationships and supporting healthy marriage among unwed parents. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 8 pp. (Building strong families; In brief, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the program design aspects of a conceptual framework that identifies factors to consider in developing programs and services to strengthen relationships in unmarried parent relationships. The brief includes the following sections: (1) why focus on unmarried parents?, (2) a conceptual framework for program services, (3) relationship skills and marriage education, (4) improving marriageability, (5) policy options to remove disincentives for marriage, and (6) looking ahead: implementation and technical assistance. The brief also includes references.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Marriage, Public policy, Relationships, Single parents

Chadwick BA, Heaton TB, eds. 1999. Statistical handbook on the American family. (2nd ed.). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 326 pp.

Annotation: This handbook presents data for interested individuals to use in making their own informed evaluation about the American family. It includes previously unpublished data plus data from a wide array of published material. Topics covered include: marriage; quality of marriage and family life; divorce; children; sexual attitudes and behavior and contraceptive use; living arrangements and kinship ties; working women, wives and mothers; family violence; and elderly families.

Keywords: Children, Contraceptive use, Divorce, Domestic violence, Families, Marriage, Older adults, Sexual attitudes, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Working women

Lindsay JW. 1995. Teenage couples: Caring, commitment and change—How to build a relationship that lasts. Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 206 pp.

Annotation: This book provides information adolescent couples need to know in order to interact with one another. It covers the emotional components of meeting and falling in love with someone, making decisions about the future of the relationship; communicating; resolving arguments; keeping a romance alive; the significance of sex; building trusting relationships; dealing with issues related to drugs, alcohol, and partner abuse, and making decisions about ending a relationship. It is one of two publications developed for adolescent couples, whether married or unmarried. The other publication, "Teenage Couples: Coping with Reality," focuses on issues relating to finances, parental relations, having children, and taking responsibility for the activities of daily life such as cooking and cleaning. A third volume, "Teenage Couples: Expectations and Reality," presents the results of a 1994 survey on adolescent couples which considered the differences in the problems encountered by couples living singly and those living together.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-92-x, paper; 1-885356-93-8, cloth.

Keywords: Adolescents, Communication, Conflict resolution, Domestic violence, Interpersonal relations, Marriage, Materials for adolescents, Relationships, Social behavior, Substance abuse

Janus S, Janus CL. 1992. The Janus report on sexual behavior: The first broad-scale scientific national survey since Kinsey. New York, NY: John Wiley and Sons, 430 pp.

Annotation: This book is the result of a nine-year investigation conducted between 1983 and 1992 of sexuality in the United States. The purpose of the study was to examine American sexual behavior and to examine how Americans engage in sex, what they believe about their sexuality, and other relevant related social and political issues including love, marriage, divorce, parenthood, and abortion.

Contact: John Wiley and Sons, Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Contact Phone: (212) 850-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA Available in libraries.

Keywords: Abortion, Adults, Marriage, Parents, Sexuality, Women's health

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1990. Work and family patterns of American women: The family life cycl: 1985 [and] Maternity leave arrangements: 1961-85. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 57 pp. (Current population reports. Special studies series; P23-165)

Annotation: The papers in this report focus on some of the social, demographic, and economic consequences of the expanding roles for women in U.S. society. The first paper, The Family Life Cycle: 1985, shows trends in the frequency and timing of marriage, divorce, remarriage, and fertility across several generations of women. The second paper, Maternity Leave Arrangements: 1961-85, presents research on factors associated with childbearing and labor force participation.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov $6.00.

Keywords: Work force, Divorce, Fertility, Marriage, Parental leave, Role, Women, Work family issues

Blankenhorn D, Bayme S, Elshtain JB, eds. 1990. Rebuilding the nest: A new commitment to the American family. Milwaukee, WI: Family Service America, 264 pp.

Annotation: This book resulted from the "What Do Families Do?" conference held at Stanford University on November 9-12, 1989, and discusses the decline of the American family. Contributing authors analyze the current status of American family citing surveys of attitudes and conditions. The causes of this decline are investigated by looking at various religious viewpoints, civic life, and values. The book is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the conditions of contemporary family life and investigates whether the institution of family is in trouble. The second part turns to the causes and examines changing values and social institutions. The final part discusses solutions and challenges facing the family in the future.

Contact: Alliance for Children and Families, 11700 West Lake Park Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53224-3099, Telephone: (414) 359-1040 Fax: (414) 359-1074 E-mail: info@alliance1.org Web Site: http://www.alliance1.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87304-242-5.

Keywords: Attitude change, Divorce, Families, Family characteristics, Fathers, Marriage, Single mothers, Working mothers

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 1989. Compilations of data on natality, mortality, marriage, divorce, and induced terminations of pregnancy. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 48 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 24, Compilations of data on natality, mortality, marriage, divorce, and induced terminations of pregnancy; no. 2)

Annotation: These supplements to the "Monthly Vital Statistics Report" present summary tabulations from final natality, mortality, marriage, and divorce statistics for 1985. Natality and mortality data are based on information from the standard certificates filed in all states and the District of Columbia. Marriage and divorce data are based on information from the marriage and divorce registration areas. These reports were originally published in 1987 and 1988.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Birth rates, Divorce, Marriage, Mortality, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.