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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (23 total).

Berger LM, McLanahan S,. 2012. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: Influences of parental characteristics, relationships, and behaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 43 pp. (Fragile families working paper: 11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines differences in child outcomes by family type, defined by the marital and biological status of parents who live with a child. The paper investigates the extent to which differences in cognitive skills and behavior problems among 5-year-olds living in different types of families are associated with differences in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors between family types. The authors then decompose the mean difference between family types in each outcome into the proportion explained by differences between family types in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors and the proportion explained by differences between family types in the influence of these factors on outcomes. Methods and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Families, Fathers, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Research, Statistical data, Young children

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2010. Fragile families. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 20, no. 2, Fall 2010)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores the complexity of fragile families, defined as families in which the parents are unwed at the time of the child's birth. Some of the research described in the volume is based on a large national survey, the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. The first four articles examine fragile families from various vantage points: the couple, the father, and the child. The fifth looks at particular issues of race and ethnicity. The last four delve into policy issues that have special pertinence for fragile families: pregnancy prevention, incarceration, postsecondary education, and marriage and fatherhood programs. An executive summary and policy brief are also available.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family characteristics, Family support programs, Marital status, Premarital pregnancy, Public policy

Helm T, Rice G, Hein J. 2009. Yuma County needs assessment. [Tuscon, AZ]: University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Center for Rural Health, 68 pp.

Annotation: This document is a needs assessment for Yuma Country, Arizona. The document includes a summary of county characteristics (history and description, demographic indicators, marital status, economic indicators, and education) and discusses general health indicators, materal and perinatal health indicators, infant and child health indicators; Healthy People 2010; Title V block grant performance measures; and a survey of prenatal care in Yuma County.

Contact: University of Arizona, Center for Rural Health, 1295 N Martin - P.O. Box 245163, Tucson, AZ 85724, Telephone: (520) 626-5823 Fax: (520) 626-3101 E-mail: http://crh.arizona.edu/contact Web Site: http://www.crh.arizona.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Domestic violence, Economic factors, Education, Educational attainment, Health, Health care utilization, Health services, Healthy People 2010, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Marital status, Perinatal health, Prenatal care, Statistical data, Title V of the Social Security Act, Unemployment, lead poisoning, oral heath

Ananat EO, Hungerman DM. 2007. The power of the pill for the next generation. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 36 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13402)

Annotation: This paper assesses how access to oral contraception among young unmarried women affected the number of children born to these women as well as the women's maternal characteristics (educational attainment, marital status, and type of career). The authors then examine how children's differing circumstances that result from women's access to oral contraception relate to changes in the women's short- and long-term fertility behavior. Finally, the authors consider whether increased availablity of oral contraception led to fewer abortions among young women. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue, provides a brief history of oral contraceptives; discusses oral contraception and maternal characteristics, the effects of oral contraception on fertility and abortion; and offers conclusions. Endnotes and references are included. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to care, Careers, Contraception, Educational attainment, Marital status, Research, Single mothers, Statistical data, Women's health, Young adults

Harknett K. 2005. Children's elevated risk of asthma in unmarried families: Underlying structural and behavioral mechanisms. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 37 pp. (Working paper no. 2005-01-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study to provide evidence on the mechanisms underlying the relationship between family structure and children's asthma to shed light on the fact that among a recent birth cohort in U.S. cities, children were far more likely to be diagnosed with asthma and to experience an asthma-related emergency within 15 months of their birth if their parents were unmarried. The paper introduces the issues, describes the theory and prior research, describes the data and methods, and offers results. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Child health, Families, Infant health, Marital status, Research, Single parents

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2005. Marriage and child wellbeing. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 175 pp. (The future of children; v. 15, no. 2, Fall 2005)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on the debate over marriage and its relationship to child well-being and provides readers with some facts and a context to help them understand that debate. The issue includes nine articles, each by a different author. The articles deal with the following topics: (1) an overview of the issue, (2) marriage as a public issue, (3) American marriage in the early 21st century, (4) the impact of family structure on family income, (5) the impact of family formation change on the cognitive, social, and emotional well-being of the next generation, (6) gay marriage, same-sex parenting, and America's children, (7) barriers to marriage among the disadvantaged, (8) healthy marriage programs: learning what works, and (9) the hefty penalty on marriage facing many households with children.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development, Children, Economic factors, Families, Family income, Homosexuality, Marital status, Marriage, Parents

Osborne C. 2004. Maternal stress and mothering behaviors in stable and unstable families. [Rev. ed.]. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 37 pp. (Working paper no. 03-08-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses data from the Fragile Families Study to answer two main questions: (1) Are there differences in maternal stress and mothering behaviors across stably married, cohabiting, visiting, and single-mother families? And (2) Does family instability have a negative impact on mothering behaviors? The paper focuses specifically on the relationship between the biological parents of a 1-year-old focal child. The paper provides background, describes the data and methodology, and offers results and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper includes references.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Infants, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Research, Single mothers, Stress

Douglas-Hall A, Koball H. 2004. Children of recent immigrants: National and regional trends. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at regional differences in how children in recent immigrant families fare -- their economic circumstances, family characteristics, and public benefits use -- and the implications for public policy. The report discusses where most children of recent immigrants live; the children's race, birthplace and income level; their parents' employment and marital status; the children's risk for economic and social problems; and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report concludes with endnotes.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Employment, Families, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, High risk children, Immigrants, Low income groups, Marital status, Parents, Public assistance, Public policy, Racial factors, Social factors

Moore KA, Jekielek SM, Emig C. 2002. Marriage from a child's perspective: How does family structure affect children, and what can we do about it?. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This report reviews the research evidence on the effects of family structure on children, as well as key trends in family structure over the last five decades. The brief also discusses promising strategies for reducing births outside marriage and for promoting strong, stable marriages. Two tables present statistical data on birth rates for unmarried women, and percent of children in one-parent and two-parent families. Endnotes conclude the report.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Divorce, Families, Marital status, Single parents, Stepfamilies

Altman BM, Taylor AK. 2001. Women in the health care system: Health status, insurance, and access to care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 37 pp. (MEPS research findings; no. 17)

Annotation: This report focuses on the health status of adult noninstitutionalized women in the United States in 1996. The report examines perceived health, mental health, and health insurance status; and access to care (usual source of care, ambulatory care services, and preventive services). The report also looks at demographic and health characteristics that may be associated with disparities in access to care or other disadvantages in the health care system, including a measure that combines marital status, presence of children in the household, and age of children. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. A technical appendix provides information about the data used.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58763-048-6.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Demography, Families, Health care systems, Health insurance, Marital status, Mental health, Prevention, Primary care, Women's health

Lindsay JW. 1996. Teenage couples: Expectations and reality—Teen views on living together, roles, work, jealousy and partner abuse. Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 190 pp.

Annotation: This book contains the results of a survey of over 3, 000 adolescent couples taken during 1994; it presents the results with regard to the participants' living arrangements, whether they were living singly or together. It presents information on the participants' attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, coping with change in their partners, faith and ethnicity, household roles, jealousy, partner abuse, living with in-laws, living arrangements and dropping out of school, employment, and parenthood. Where applicable, the book supports its analysis with data drawn from the survey; it concludes with coping strategies. It is one of three volumes targeted toward adolescent couples; the other two titles in the set are: "Teenage Couples: Coping with Reality, " and "Teenage Couples: Caring, Commitment, and Change."

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-98-9, paper; 1-885356-99-7, cloth.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attitudes, Domestic violence, Employment, Life skills, Marital status, Relationships, Statistics, Surveys

Luker K. 1996. Dubious conceptions: The politics of teenage pregnancy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 283 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the current views and beliefs about adolescent pregnancy that influence social policy and political attitudes. The author presents the historical context of adolescent pregnancy and parenthood, and traces how attitudes about and approaches to dealing with these issues have changed. Quotes from the mothers involved illustrate the discussions of why adolescents get pregnant, how it affects the lives and future prospects of the adolescents and those of their babies, how sex education affects their behavior, and the impact of their socioeconomic status and upbringing on their goals and behavior.

Contact: Harvard University Press, 79 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (800) 405-1619 Secondary Telephone: 401-531-2800 Fax: (800) 406-9145 E-mail: contact_hup@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.hup.harvard.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-674-21702-0 .

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Child welfare, Consent, Demography, Educational attainment, Family income, Marital status, Maternal age, Policy development, Pregnant adolescents, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social conditions, Social policy, Social values, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 1995. Report to Congress on out-of-wedlock childbearing. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 265 pp., exec. summ. (29 pp.).

Annotation: This report contains an introductory chapter which discusses trends, a demographic analysis of nonmarital childbearing, and expert papers on various aspects of the subject. The introductory chapter, Nonmarital Childbearing in the United States, by Kristin A. Moore provides information on four main topics relating to out-of-wedlock childbearing: current trends, societal consequences, causes, and efforts to prevent pregnancy or childbearing among unmarried persons or to resolve the negative implications associated with parenthood outside of marriage. The demographics provide detailed statistics on trends, causal factors, efforts to effect societal change, financial implications, and international comparisons. The executive summary is available separately; it describes the contents and provides an overview of the full report, and it contains the introductory chapter from the full report.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov $20.00 (includes shipping and handling); price unknown for executive summary, available from National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Telephone: (301) 436-8500. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-048332-8; DHHS (PHS) 95-1257-1 (executive summary).

Keywords: Attitudes, Childbirth, Data, Family characteristics, Marital status, Policy development, Prevention, Program development, Single parents, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

Becerra J, Mather F. 1995. Low birthweight and infant mortality in Puerto Rico. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 6 pp. (Research roundtable special research presentation)

Annotation: This report studies the infant deaths associated with low birthweight on mainland Puerto Rico and among Puerto Ricans in the continental United States. It considers the relative contributions of maternal age, martial status, maternal education, hospital of birth and use of prenatal care in Puerto Rico. It also assess the contributions of the same factors to infant mortality after accounting for the effect of birthweight. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Education, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Marital status, Maternal age, Prenatal care, Puerto Ricans, Puerto Rico

Peterson LS. 1995. Birth expectations of women in the United States, 1973-88. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 36 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 23, Data from the National Survey of Family Growth; no. 17)

Annotation: This report presents data from the National Survey of Family Growth. It includes statistics collected in 1973, 1982, and 1988 on children ever born and future births expected. The statistics are shown for women 15 - 44 years of age at each survey date, by age, race, and parity. The data are also shown for birth cohorts of women surveyed in 1973, 1982, and 1988. The report discusses the source and limitations of the data, the findings, and the differences between the National Survey of Family Growth and Current Population Survey Estimates.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 95-1993.

Keywords: Age groups, Birth intervals, Birth rates, Blacks, Comparative analysis, Family size, Fertility, Marital status, Maternal age, Racial factors, Statistics, Trends, Whites

Health Insurance Association of America. 1994-. Sourcebook of health insurance data. Washington, DC: Health Insurance Association of America, annual.

Annotation: This annual compilation of health insurance data focuses on managed care programs, medical care costs, hospital utilization, and morbidity and mortality statistics. The sources for this book are the Health Insurance Association of America's annual survey along with reports from insurance companies, government agencies, hospital and medical associations, and private research companies. Tables depict interrelationships between medical costs and the Consumer Price Index, physician fees, and the Gross National Product. The report includes figures on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, workplace injuries, childbirth costs, transplant procedures, and AIDS-related expenditures. Hospital utilization statistics such as discharge rates, length of stay, and uncompensated care expenditures include data for community hospitals. A historical overview of the health insurance industry and health maintenance organizations is included along with a chronological listing of industry-related facts.

Keywords: AIDS, Age factors, Costs, Employers, Gender, Health care financing, Health insurance, Health maintenance organizations, History, Hospitals, Injuries, Managed care, Marital status, Medicaid, Medicare, Mental disorders, Mortality, Race, Services, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Substance abuse, Surveys, Trends, Uninsured persons

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1994. Families on welfare: Teenage mothers least likely to become self-sufficient. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on mothers receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children between 1976 and 1992 who gave birth as adolescents. It describes the background and methodology of the study and presents the results in brief. An appendix includes tables and figures related to the study. Findings are given regarding these mothers' educational attainment, the size of their families, their marital status, and their racial and ethnic composition; and the report considers their employment and earnings capabilities.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-94-115.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Educational attainment, Ethnic groups, Families, Family income, Family size, Federal programs, Marital status, Race, Statistics, Welfare programs, Welfare services

U.S. Congress, House of Representatives, Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. 1990. Children's well-being: An international comparison. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 149 pp. (101st Congress, 2d Session, Committee Print)

Annotation: This report present the majority and minority views and the text of a study of the same name which was prepared in 1990 by Frank Hobbs and Laura Lippman of the Center for International Research, Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce. Information and data are presented on the populations and demographics of youth internationally, on family characteristics, marriage and fertility patterns, economic conditions, health indicators, injuries and mortality, and education and employment. The study compares conditions affecting the well-being of children, adolescents, and young adults in developed and developing countries. and the findings are discussed with particular reference to the United States.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescents, Cause of death, Children, Demographics, Developed countries, Developed nations, Developing countries, Education, Employment, Fertility, Health status, Injuries, International data, Marital status, Mortality, Socioeconomic factors, Young adults

Cherlin AJ, ed. 1988. The changing American family and public policy. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 263 pp. (Changing domestic priorities series)

Annotation: This series assesses the impact and significance of the changes in domestic policy that have occurred under the Reagan administration and analyses the critical economic and social issues facing the nation during the 1980s and beyond. This title brings a social science perspective to bear on family change and family policy, identifies the determinants of change, and analyses the role that government has played and can play in affecting the course of family life. It analyses the trends from the perspective of children, mothers, and fathers. The contributors report on changes in the child population, their physical and mental health, academic achievements, economic status, and social behavior. It includes reports on the changing role of marriage and the family, the economic and social roles of mothers and fathers, and the implications for social policy; these reports are supported by statistical tables. The final chapter analyzes the links between government policy and family structure.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-422-6, cloth; 0-87766-421-8, paper.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent mental health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child mortality, Child rearing, Child welfare, Children, Divorce, Families, Family characteristics, Family relations, Family support programs, Family support services, Fathers, Fertility, Financial support, Marital status, Public policy, Single parents, Social change, Statistics, Working mothers

Beyer CM. 1931. Children of working mothers in Philadelphia: Part 1—The working mothers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 39 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 204)

Annotation: This report on working mothers in Philadelphia examines the relationship between the employment of mothers and the welfare of their children. Information is presented on the extent and nature of employment of mothers by race, nationality, age, marital status, and number of children. Conclusions regarding trends in maternal employment are also included. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic groups, Field studies, Marital status, Pennsylvania, Reports, Work family issues, Working mothers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.