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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (56 total).

Delta Dental of New Jersey Foundation. n.d.. The PANDA program. Parsippany, NJ: Delta Dental of New Jersey, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help oral health professionals in New Jersey recognize and report child abuse and neglect. Information about training is included.

Contact: Delta Dental of New Jersey, Delta Dental Plaza, 1639 Route 10, Parsippany, NJ 07054, Telephone: (800) 452-9310 Fax: (973) 285-4141 E-mail: service@deltadentalnj.com Web Site: http://www.deltadentalnj.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Dentists, Injuries, Maltreated children, New Jersey, Oral health, Resources for professionals, State programs, Training

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2016. Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document provides the statutory basis for identifying persons who are required to report child maltreatment under certain circumstances for all of the United States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Lists include a description of the person required to report maltreatment, standards for making a report, privileged communications, and inclusion or other disclosure of the reporter’s identity.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children, Legal definitions, Legal responsibility, Legislation, Maltreated children, Oral health, Standards

Jessee SA, Deinard AS. 2016. Child abuse and neglect: Implications for the dental professional (rev. ed.). Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include the incidence, etiology, and long-term effects of child maltreatment; the dentist’s role in intervention; identifying neglect and physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; assessment (history taking and diagnosis); and treating orofacial and dental trauma. A tool that educators can use for creating a student assignment is also available.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Dentistry, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Learning, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Teaching, Trauma

Sacks V, Murphey D, Moore K. 2014. Adverse childhood experiences: National and state level prevalence. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Research brief)

Moore K, Sacks V, Bandy T, Murphey D. 2014. Adverse childhood experiences and well-being of adolescents. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Welfare Information Gateway, FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, and Center for the Study of Social Policy—Strengthening Families. 2013. 2013 resource guide: Preventing child maltreatment and promoting well-being—A network for action. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 74 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide offers support to community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being, as well as others such as policymakers, parent educators, family support workers, health-care providers, program administrators, teachers, child care providers, mentors, and clergy. Contents include: (1) laying the groundwork for understanding child well-being, (2) working with families and six protective factors, (3) engaging the community, (4) protecting children, (5) tip sheets for parents and caregivers, and (6) resources. The tip sheets section includes some items in English and Spanish.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Community based services, Family support services, Maltreated children, Parent education, Prevention, Spanish language materials

RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Child exposure to trauma: Comparative effectiveness of interventions addressing maltreatment. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 400 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 89)

Annotation: This review assesses the comparative effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 exposed to maltreatment in addressing child well-being outcomes (mental and behavioral health; caregiver-child relationship; cognitive, language, and physical development; and school-based functioning) and child welfare outcomes (safety, placement stability, and permanency). The review also assesses the comparative effectiveness of interventions with (1) different treatment characteristics, (2) for child and caregiver subgroups, and (3) for engaging and retaining children and caregivers in treatment. In addition, the review assesses harms associated with interventions for this population.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 13-EHC002-EF.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Language development, Maltreated children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Physical development, Safety, School failure, School readiness, Treatment

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2013. Child maltreatment: Primary care interventions. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides summarizes recommendations on primary care interventions to prevent maltreatment in children from birth to age 18. Contents include the recommendation statement, evidence report, clinical summary, consumer fact sheet, and evidence synthesis.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Intervention, Maltreated children, Primary care, Resources for professionals, Screening

Jordan E, Szrom J, Colvard J, Cooper H, DeVooght K. 2013. Changing the course for infants and toddlers: A survey of state child welfare policies and initiatives. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends; Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of states and the District of Columbia about policies and practices that guide child welfare agencies' work in addressing the needs of maltreated infants and toddlers. It provides information about the survey; summarizes results related to assessment and services, infants and toddlers in foster care and their families (including post-permanency care for this population); training in early childhood development and developmentally appropriate practice; and data collection and analysis. An executive summary, an index of state policies and practices to support the development of young children, and a brief document about understanding and meeting the needs of birth parents are also available.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare, Foster care, Infants, Maltreated children, National surveys, Needs assessment, State surveys, Training, Young children

Zero to Three. 2013. State child welfare policies and practices that support infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 5 items.

Annotation: This webinar presents findings from a 2013 survey of state child welfare agencies about the policies and practices that guide the agencies' work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated. It demonstrates how three states' policies and practices reflect a developmental approach to child welfare services for young children. The website includes links the audio presentation, the slides, and the survey upon which the webinar is based. A link to the print copy of the survey report is also provided.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Child welfare agencies, Maltreated children, National surveys, Policy, Research, Young children

Dreisbach N. 2013. Responding to adverse childhood experiences. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 4 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This brief focuses on young children and early traumatic stressors, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE), to further understand the pathway leading to heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory diseases as leading causes of death in the United States. It outlines types of ACEs, a framework for research, and the role of health philanthropy in mitigating childhood adversity in selected examples in several states.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Maltreated children, Mortality, Trauma, Young children

Briar-Lawson K, McCarthy M, Dickerson N, eds. 2013. The Children's Bureau: Shaping a century of child welfare practices, programs, and policies. Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers, 342 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines the 100-year history of the Children's Bureau and highlights the ways it has influenced modern-day child welfare practices. Topics include lessons learned, family driven and community-based systems of care, addressing poverty as a child welfare strategy, youth and family engagement, successful transition to adulthood for foster youth, child protection, child maltreatment, social work, tribal and urban Indian child welfare, work force, leadership development, and envisioning the future.

Contact: National Association of Social Workers, 750 First Street, N.E., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20002-4241, Telephone: (202) 408-8600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 742-4089 Fax: E-mail: membership@naswdc.org Web Site: http://www.socialworkers.org $55.99, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-087101-446-7.

Keywords: American Indians, Federal agencies, Child abuse, Child advocacy, Child welfare, Children, Children's Bureau, Families, Foster care, History, Maltreated children, Poverty, Social work, Socioeconomic factors, Transitions, Work force

Every Child Matters Education Fund. 2012. We can do better: Child abuse and neglect deaths in America. (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Every Child Matters Education Fund, 20 pp.

Annotation: This updated report focuses on children who die as a result of child abuse and neglect, and what can be done to alleviate the problem. The report discusses the preventable nature of child abuse deaths and the importance of elevating the protection of children to a national priority, the magnitude of the problem, the relationship between child abuse and neglect deaths and extensive child maltreatment, child abuse and neglect in the United States compared with other countries, geographical factors, lack of resources and training, confidentiality laws, poverty, and the need for government action.

Contact: Every Child Matters Education Fund, 1023 15th Street, NW, Suite 401 , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 223-8177 Fax: (202) 223-8499 E-mail: info@everychildmatters.org Web Site: http://www.everychildmatters.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child death, Child neglect, Confidentiality, Geographic factors, Maltreated children, Poverty, Prevention, Training

Mulrooney K, Williams DS. 2012. Increasing understanding of infants and young children in military families through focused research. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 7 pp. (CIR policy brief)

Annotation: This brief describes what is understood about the effects of multiple or prolonged combat deployments on military families, particularly the experiences and outcomes of school-aged children's health and well-being. Contents include sections on the exceptional nature of the very young child, understanding potential risks for child maltreatment, a review of the Research and Resilience Initiative, and recommendations for conducting future research on young children in military families.

Contact: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 1149 South Hill Street, Suite H-1114, Los Angeles, CA 90015, Telephone: (213) 821-3600 Fax: (213) 821-3601 E-mail: cir@usc.edu Web Site: http://cir.usc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Families, Maltreated children, Military, Research, School age children, Stress, Young children

Walsh WA, Mattingly MJ. 2012. Understanding child abuse in rural and urban America: Risk factors and maltreatment substantiation. Durham, NC: Carsey Institute, 4 pp. (Issue brief no. 50)

Annotation: This report examines the risk factors associated with child maltreatment and the number of cases substantiated by Child Protective Services (CPS) in rural and urban America. Based on data from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II) collected in 2008 and 2009, the report looks at the types of maltreatment substantiated; the types of abuse according to place (urban vs. rural); and caregiver risk factors such as substance abuse, poverty, or mental health issue and substantiation according to place.

Contact: Carsey Institute, University of New Hampshire, 73 Main Street, Huddleston Hall G05B, Durham, NH 03824, Telephone: (603) 862-2821 Fax: (603) 862-3878 Web Site: http://www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Data, Maltreated children, National surveys, Reports, Rural health, Urban health

Burwick A, Strong D, Xue Y, Koball H, Coffee-Borden B, Zaveri H, Boller K, Daro D. 2012. Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Cross-site evaluation cost study background and design update. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research; Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 22 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report provides background and design information for assessing the costs of home visiting programs that aim to prevent child maltreatment. Topics include the purpose of cost analyses, existing literature on the costs of home visiting program models, study design, and approaches to the collection and analysis of cross-site cost study data.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Research design

Boller K, Daro D, Strong D, Zaveri H, Paulsell D, Hargreaves M, Cole R, Del Grosso P, Vogel C, Burwick A, Meagher C, Barrett K. 2012. Data collection instruments for the evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment cross-site evaluation. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 11 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This manual provides data use collection instruments used in a national cross-site evaluation of home visiting programs. It includes protocols from site visits; a protocol for interviews on system change activities, along with a sample logic model; a survey of partners; an instrument for collecting data on program fidelity; and an instrument for a web-based time use survey.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Protocols, Surveys

Spielberger J, Gouvea M, Rich L. 2012. Improving school readiness: A brief report from the Palm Beach County Family Study. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 10 pp. (Chapin Hall discussion paper)

Annotation: This brief presents findings about the potential impact of the service system on improving children's readiness for school from a longitudinal study of a sample of families at high risk living in targeted geographic areas that have higher-than-average rates of child maltreatment, crime, and other related factors that affect school readiness. The brief describes characteristics that are likely to influence children's school readiness, presents findings related to families' use of a range of formal services during their children's early years, and looks at the relationship between these factors and one indicator of children's readiness for school—scores on the Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screen.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Communities, Crime, Early childhood development, Families, Family support services, Health services, High risk groups, Low income groups, Maltreated children, Parent support services, Research, Risk factors, School readiness, Service delivery systems, Young children

Benedetti G. 2012. Innovations in the field of child abuse and neglect prevention: A review of the literature. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 65 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines work focused on improving the understanding of child abuse and neglect, basic human development, effective program planning, and promising systemic reforms. Contents include trends in advances in neuroscience and the developing brain in children; social context and culture, promising community prevention strategies, federal policy initiatives in public investment toward evidence-based programs, addressing needs of new parents and young children; service delivery processes and model program quality, maximizing population-level change, and the opportunities offered by new technologies.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Cultural factors, Early childhood development, Literature reviews, Maltreated children, Parent child relations, Parenting attitudes, Program development, Research, Social factors

Daro D, Hart B, Boller K, Bradley MC. 2012. Replicating home visiting programs with fidelity: Baseline data and preliminary findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall; Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 156 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report discusses the logic of a framework used to monitor program implementation and fidelity across evidence-based home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. It also outlines key components and indicators, as well as utility, in three areas, home visitor and supervisory caseloads, service duration, and service dosage. Contents also include data collection and analysis methods, profiles of participants and home visitors/supervisors, characteristics and content of home visits, assessing three dimensions of structural fidelity, and conclusions and next steps. References and appendices are also included.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Home visiting, MCH research, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.