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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Toldson IA, Manekin SD. 2014. Building bridges: Connecting out-of-school time to classroom success among school-age Black males in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation, 74 pp.

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

Bandy T. 2012. What works for male children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet on male children and adolescents examines programs and interventions that work (as well as those that don't work) as this population transitions into young adulthood. It examines the challenges that can impede the healthy development of young people, highlighting differences between males and females, and summarizes findings from a review of 115 interventions that either target or provide impact data on male children and adolescents. Outcome areas include academic achievement, delinquency, acting out, mental health, physical health and nutrition, reproductive health and sexuality, social skills, and substance use.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Child development, Evaluations, Gender, Interventions, Literature reviews, Male children, Reports, Risk factors

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. Eating disorders. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about eating disorders. The document explains what eating disorders are; discusses the different types of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; explains how eating disorders are treated, and discusses how males are affected and what is being done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 11-4901.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia, Child behavior, Eating disorders, Female children, Male children, Treatment

Bertrand M, Pan J. 2011. The trouble with boys: Social influences and the gender gap in disruptive behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17541)

Annotation: This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. The authors discuss data used, what drives the gender gap in non-cognitive skills, and why boys raised by single mothers are particularly at risk.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Families, Female children, Income factors, Low income groups, Male children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Research, School role, Single mothers

Eilers WB. 2010. Boys' Health Advocacy Program [Final report]. Rapid City, SD: Youth and Family Services, Inc., 22 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a program to address access to health care services for at-risk boys in Rapid City, South Dakota who have urgent or unmet health care requirements or do not receive routine health care from March 2005 through February 2010. Also included in the report is an outline of the methodology, evaluation, results, dissemination/utilization of results, future plans and followup, as well as a list of publications and products. Goals and objectives are also discussed. Attached to the report is a copy of the 2009-2010 program evaluation report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Final reports, Health services delivery, Male children, South Dakota

California Endowment. 2010. Healthy communities matter: The importance of place to the health of boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights how the neighborhoods where Latino and African-American boys and young men grow up directly influence their health outcomes. It examines racial and ethnic disparities -- and the magnitude of these disparities -- between boys and young men of color and white boys and young men across four broad areas: health, safety, socioeconomic, and ready-to-learn. The report analysis and findings point to the need for comprehensive policy solutions implemented at the community level in order to reduce such disparities. Examples of promising programs in communities across the country are provided.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Community programs, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Life course, Male children, Minority health, Model programs, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Underserved communities, Young men

Brooks J, Gluck N, Lee M, Lizardo R, Marsh D, Serang F, Jeter J. 2010. The promise of a healthy California: Overcoming the barriers for men and boys of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report uses previously documented trends illustrating racial disparities and their impact within communities to assess the context of systemic failures within the state of California and to explore solutions that address the importance of place in the quality of an individual's life. The report details the insights and lessons gleaned from research done by Harvard University’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice; highlights successful practices; explores the elements that contribute to effective advocacy and public support; and makes recommendations for policy change and intervention. It argues for community-led approaches that will enhance the lives of African American and Latino boys and men, recognizing that social, physical, economic, and environmental factors are all connected.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Blacks, Communities, Community action, Data trends, Factor analysis, Hispanic Americans, Male children, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Racial factors

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. Reparable harm: Assessing and addressing disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 122 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a conceptual framework which describes macro, community, interpersonal, and individual level contextual factors that interact to promote or inhibit positive health outcomes. It then examines disparities in socioeconomic, physical and mental health, safety, and readiness to learn indicators that exist between boys and men of color and white boys and men in California. It calculates the odds for outcomes across a variety of indicators in these four domains to illustrate the challenges that boys and men of color are more likely to face in succeeding in life. It reviews strategies, practices, and policies for reducing these disparities and concludes with an appendix of data on additional indicators.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $55 plus shipping and handling, or available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4561-4.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, California, Environmental influences, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites, Young men

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. The socioeconomic, health, safety, and education disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 4 pp. (Research highlights)

Annotation: This report summarizes a larger report examining socioeconomic, health, safety, and learning disparities that exist between men and boys of color and white men and boys in California. The disparities are reported in odds, illustrating the greater likelihood of success-inhibiting challenges in the lives of men and boys of color. It summarizes some strategies and policies recommended to improve outcomes where these disparities exist and illustrates the data with charts.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, California, Educational factors, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male adolescents, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, State surveys, Young men

Rich J, Corbin T, Bloom S, Rich L, Evans S, and Wilson A. 2009. Healing the hurt: Trauma-informed approaches to the health of boys and young men of color. Los Angeles, CA: California Endowment, 83 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the effects of trauma on the health of boys and young men of color (Hispanic and African American) over the course of their lifespan and explores ways in which poor health outcomes might be prevented or mitigated. Included are definitions of trauma and trauma theory; a review of the science related to trauma and brain development; a discussion of trauma as a social determinant; and possible applications of trauma knowledge to community prevention and system change efforts. Included is a detailed description of the Sanctuary Model -- an evidence-supported method for creating a culture in which healing from psychologically and socially traumatic experiences can be addressed. A list of selected references is included, along with an appendix of trauma experts in the state of California.

Contact: California Endowment, Greater Los Angeles Program Office, 1000 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (800) 449-4149 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.calendow.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Human development, Life course, Male children, Mental health, Minority health, Prevention programs, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Trauma, Young men

Vandivere S, Zaslow M, Brooks J, Redd Z . 2004. Do child characteristics affect how children fare in families receiving and leaving welfare? . Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 42 pp. (Assessing the new federalism; discussion papers)

Annotation: This paper reports on the use of data from the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) in analyses revealing a pattern in which male adolescents in the families of former welfare recipients (leavers) may be faring worse than their counterparts in the families of current recipients. The paper looks at how developmental risk compares for children in current recipient and leaver families by gender, age, race, and ethnicity; why adolescent boys in leaver families might fare worse than those in current recipient families; and further evidence on why adolescent boys in former recipient families seem at elevated risk. The paper includes a conclusion and discussion, references, and appendix tables.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Age factors, Child development, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Males, Racial factors, Sex characteristics, Welfare programs

Jaros KJ, St. Denis GC, eds. [1991]. Use of public health social work leadership tools and strategies: Addressing health issues of black male adolescents and children. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, Public Health Social Work Training Program, 130 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings present papers from the 1991 Public Health Social Work Institute, which was funded with support from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The papers defined and discussed the problems of minority male children and identified community programs that were using creative strategies to reach high-risk populations. Particular emphasis was placed on program models to mobilize community resources and build innovative collaborative arrangements. Specific topics include outreach and health education, drug treatment, violence prevention, culturally specific AIDS intervention, involvement of professional organizations, strategies for working effectively with community coalitions, funding priorities of government and private foundations, recruitment and training of minority health professionals, and changing organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Blacks, Child health, Children, Interagency cooperation, Males, Social work

Bowler AC, Bloodgood RS. 1935. Institutional treatment of delinquent boys: Part 1—Treatment programs of five state institutions. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 324 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 228)

Barbarin OA, ed. Emotional development of African American children. Journal of Black Psychology. 19(4):381-504. November 1993,

Annotation: This special issue contains articles written by individual authors or groups of authors who focus on various issues related to treating the emotional development of African American children and adolescents. Following an introduction to the scope of the problem, the articles focus on the following topics: culture and social outcomes among inner-city children; self-esteem, cultural identify, and psychosocial adjustment; behavioral, emotional, and academic adjustment relating to age, gender, and family structure; clinical issues relating to the diagnosis of patients using the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, " 3rd edition; the social context of adolescent childbearing; coping and resilience among African American children, and understanding black adolescent male violence.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available in libraries. Document Number: Order no. 302080.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior disorders, Blacks, Children, Coping, Cultural factors, Demographics, Education, Emotional development, Mental health, Psychosocial factors, Resilience, Self esteem, Sociocultural factors, Statistics, Treatment, Urban population, Violence

Grantmakers for Children, Youth, and Families. Improving opportunity paths for boys of color. Insight: A Review of Current GCYF Topics and Issues. Winter '07/'08,

Annotation: This issue of the journal Insight focuses on black male children and adolescents and on what can be done to improve opportunities for them. The articles in this issue discuss (1) making education safe for black male children and adolescents, (2) integrating gender and race to inform strategies focused on this population, (3) the overrepresentation of children of color in the foster care system, and (4) incarceration in the lives of black children and adolescents.

Contact: Grantmakers for Children, Youth and Families, 12138 Central Avenue, Suite 422, Mitchellville, MD 20721, Telephone: (301) 589-4293 Fax: (301) 589-4289 E-mail: info@gcyf.org Web Site: http://www.gcyf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Education, Foster care, Foster children, Incarcerated youth, Male adolescents, Male children, Racial factors, Safety

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.