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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (447 total).

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

De Geyndt W. n.d.. Evaluation of health programs: An annotated bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 107 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (9))

Annotation: This bibliography is a revision and updating of comment series no. 7-9 (4) with the addition new sources and annotations for all sources. This publication supersedes the previous non-annotated bibliography, "Bibliography on Evaluation of Health Programs." This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Bibliographies, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Health services, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Weckwerth VE. n.d.. The comprehensive hardware store: An analogy prepared in response to a request for the difference between comprehensive health care and other care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (10))

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal Child Health Work Force Development. 2018. Sustaining diversity and health equity efforts in maternal and child health training programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (16:23 minutes).

Annotation: In this podcast leaders from two (Tulane University and University of Minnesota) of eight programs who participated in the 2017 diversity and health equity learning collaborative explore how to meaningfully engage trainees and how to institutionalize and sustain their efforts. A transcript, an overview and case studies are also available.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, MCH training programs, Video recordings, Work force

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and U.S. Administration on Children and Families. 2017. The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Partnering with parents to help children succeed. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Home Visiting Program) to support voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. Topics include efforts to expand services to more families and communities, program participants, notable achievements, the Tribal Home Visiting Program, and research and evaluation. State fact sheets are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health services delivery, Home visiting, Infants, Parents, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Program descriptions, School readiness, State MCH programs, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. Pathways to family leadership within AMCHP. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document defines the term "family leader" and describes the roles for family leaders in the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs' activities. Topics include title, eligibility criteria, selection process, timeline, and duties.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Contact Phone: (202) 775-1472 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Contact E-mail: mjarvix@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Teaching, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Volunteers, Work force

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Association of State Public Health Nutritionists. 2016. Incorporating nutrition into the Title V MCH services block grant national performance measures. Johnstown, PA: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, 14 pp.

Annotation: This document suggests nutrition-related strategies for impacting health outcomes in the maternal and child health (MCH) population. Contents include evidence-based or -informed strategies that can be developed and used by states to monitor accountability, quality improvement, and performance of Title V programs. Topics include emphasizing nutrition and dietary aspects of oral health and ensuring appropriate referrals for nutrition needs identified during preventive oral health visits. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State Public Health Nutritionists, P.O. Box 1001, Johnstown, PA 15907-1001, Telephone: (814) 255-2829 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (814) 255-6514 Web Site: http://www.asphn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Health services delivery, Measures, Nutrition, Preventive services, State MCH programs, Title V programs

MCH Workforce Performance Center. 2016. Diversity and health equity in the maternal and child health workforce: A resource guide to key strategies and actions for MCH training programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides strategies and activities to support maternal and child health (MCH) training programs' efforts to increase diversity and integrate cultural and linguistic competence into training efforts. Contents include resources and short vignettes highlighting strategies used by MCH training programs. Topics include recruiting and retaining faculty, trainees, and program staff from racially and ethnically diverse and underrepresented backgrounds; raising awareness of disparities and inequities through curricula, research, learning, practice, and service environments; and integrating cultural and linguistic competence into training, learning, practice, and service. An archived webinar about the intent of the resource and suggestions on how to use it is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Learning, MCH training programs, Recruitment, Work force

Strengthen the Evidence. 2016. Sample strategies and evidence-based or -informed strategy measures. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document presents sample strategies for improving maternal and child health and measures for demonstrating success. Contents are organized within the following six domains: women/maternal health, perinatal/infant health, child health and/or adolescent health, adolescent health, children and youth with special health care needs, and cross-cutting/life course. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Evidence based medicine, Health promotion, Infants, MCH programs, Measures, Methods, National initiatives, Preventive health services, Program planning, Women

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, MCH Training Program. 2016. Diversity and cultural competency resources. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document describes federal activities and resources to support diversity and cultural competency within the maternal and child health (MCH) work force. Topics include agency-wide strategic planning to improve health equity; pipeline training program requirements for collecting data on the race and ethnicity of trainees and faculty and the degree to which programs have incorporated cultural and linguistic competence into policies, guidelines, contracts, and training; and resources to support programs in advancing and sustaining cultural and linguistic competence such as technical assistance, peer mentoring, and collaboration.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Data collection, Ethnic groups, Goals, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Information dissemination, MCH training programs, Measures, Mentors, Peer groups, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Race, Technical assistance, Work force

U.S. Administration for Children and Families and U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2016. Demonstrating improvement in the maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program: A report to Congress. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Administration for Children and Families; [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes of the federal home visiting program's state grantees in serving high-risk populations and substantially expanding home visiting services nationwide. Topics include the extent to which state grantees demonstrated improvements in each of the benchmark areas, technical assistance provided to grantees including the type of assistance provided, and recommendations for legislative or administrative action.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Home Visiting and Early Childhood Systems, Health Resources and Services Administration , 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-8590 E-mail: dwillis@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/home-visiting Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Health care reform, Health services delivery, High risk groups, Home visiting, MCH research, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State MCH programs, Technical assistance

Vermont Department of Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health. 2016. Brief: Oral health. Burlington, VT: Vermont Department of Health, Division of Maternal & Child Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents information and data on the percentage of children and adolescents (ages 1–17) who had a preventive dental visit in the past year and on the percentage of women who had a preventive dental visit during pregnancy in Vermont. Data on oral health care use among children and adolescents are presented by age and by insurance type. Data on the receipt of oral health care during pregnancy are presented for women who did and did not receive Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance and by health insurance type, age, and educational attainment. Strategies to improve oral health care in Vermont and data limitations and sources are also discussed.

Contact: Vermont Oral Health Coalition, Telephone: (802) 651-7408 Web Site: http://www.vtoralhealthcoalition.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental care, Disease prevention, Health care utilization, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, State MCH programs, State surveys, Vermont

Heider F, Wirth B, Kuznetsov RD. 2016. Medicaid managed care: Challenges and opportunities for pediatric medical home implementation and children and youth with special health care needs. Elk Grove Village, IL: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for Title V programs, clinicians, and family leaders provides information about the potential effect of Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) managed care on children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and their families. Topics include requirements for managed care organizations in CHIP and opportunities to mitigate potential unintended negative consequences of Medicaid managed care for CYSHCN and their families. Promising practices and strategies from states are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: https://medicalhomeinfo.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Contract services, Enrollment, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Medicaid managed care, Medical home, Model programs, Primary care, Service delivery systems, Special health care needs, State MCH programs, Youth

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health. 2016. Roles of family staff or consultants within Title V MCH and CYSHCN programs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses various roles, and activities within these roles, of families who are in paid positions as staff or consultants to state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) and children and youth special health care needs (CYSHCN) programs. Topics include roles for family engagement in the Title V Block Grant guidance; depth of engagement (family roles along a continuum); roles and activities by level of engagement (input, partnership, service provision, policy-level leadership); and family engagement in Title V needs assessment activities.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Needs assessment, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Title V programs, Training, Work force

Connecticut Voices for Children. 2016. Independent performance monitoring in the HUSKY Program: Ensuring accountability for scarce state dollars. New Haven, CT: Connecticut Voices for Children, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on aspects of Connecticut’s publicly funded HUSKY Program performance and quality based on findings from independent performance monitoring. Topics include continuity of health insurance coverage and enrollment changes, maternal health and birth outcomes for new families, enrollment and preventive health services use in early childhood, trends in health services access and use, the impact of a federally funded project on maternal and infant oral health services, and data-quality improvement.

Contact: Connecticut Voices for Children, 33 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06510, Telephone: (203) 498-4240 Fax: (203) 498-4242 E-mail: voices@ctvoices.org Web Site: http://www.ctvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Connecticut, Early childhood, Enrollment, Evaluation, Financing, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Medicaid, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Pregnancy, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Quality assurance, State MCH programs, Trends

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health Program. [2015]. Pay for prevention: Oral health services at NH WIC. Concord, NH: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health Program, 1 p.

Annotation: This poster presentation describes a partnership between the state oral health program, public health dental hygienists, and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) staff at three sites in New Hampshire to provide on-site preventive oral health services to pregnant women and children enrolled in WIC. The goal of the project was to determine if this service-delivery model could be sustained without supplementary grants. Topics include background on clinical needs, barriers to care, current research, project services, project costs, and first-year findings.

Contact: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health Program, 29 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301-3852, Telephone: (603) 271-4535 Secondary Telephone: (800) 852-3345, ext. 4535 Fax: (603) 271-4506 E-mail: http://business.nh.gov/EmailContact/EmailContact.aspx?a=cdpc&b=Chronic%20Disease%20Prevention%20and%20Control Web Site: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/oral/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Evaluation, Health services delivery, Infants, Model programs, New Hampshire, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, State MCH programs, Sustainability, WIC program, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2015. Health for every mother: A maternal health resource and planning guide for states. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 118 pp.

Annotation: This guide for maternal and child health (MCH) programs and their partners provides a synthesis of program and policy recommendations and offers a framework to support states in identifying next steps. Contents include strategies and planning tools for strengthening maternal data systems, increasing the value of an investment in maternal health, enabling healthy living, improving access to care, ensuring high quality health care for women, and ensuring readiness and response to obstetric emergencies.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency medical services, MCH programs, MCH services, Maternal health, Mothers, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program improvement, Program planning, Quality assurance, Systems development, Women's health services

Virginia Home Visiting Consortium. 2015. Home visiting helps Virginia's investments work better. Harrisonburg, VA: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about the costs and benefits of high quality home visiting programs for families with children from birth to age 5 in Virginia. Topics include the impact of home visiting on student performance, family health, and community economic well-being.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, Harrisonburg, VA , Telephone: (540) 568-5251 Fax: (540) 568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconsortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Early childhood development, Family health, Financing, Home visiting, Prenatal care, Preventive health services, Quality assurance, School readiness, State MCH programs, Virginia, Young children

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2015. Strategic plan FY 2016–FY 2018. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 16 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan provides a blueprint for the US. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to address access and service delivery issues in the context of an evolving healthcare system. It describes these goals: (1) improve access to quality health care and services; (2) strengthen the health workforce; (3) build healthy communities; (4) improve health equity; and (5) strengthen HRSA program management and operations. It also discusses performance measures and provides an overview of principal programs.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, Strategic plans, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.