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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (71 total).

Malach R. n.d.. Case Management for Parents of Indian Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project provided a model program for American Indian families and the professionals who served them. The program goals were to identify cultural, systemic, institutional, and policy barriers that inhibit Native American family participation in the "Western" health care/case management system; improve case management by facilitating effective communication between Native American families and the non-Native American health care professionals who serve them; and increase Native American family participation in health care policy development and planning forums in order to promote changes that improve services for Native American children and families. Activities included developing a videotape illustrating effective cross-cultural communication strategies for non-Indian health care providers and training an Indian parent advocate to help families seen at IHS special pediatric clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158251.

Keywords: American Indians, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Family-Based Health Care, Indian Health Service (IHS), Low income groups, Parents, Rural Population

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Lobach K. n.d.. Rate and Duration of Breastfeeding in Low Income Women in the Bronx [Final report]. Bronx, NY: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 55 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to mount a large scale effort to improve the rate and duration of breastfeeding in low income women in the Bronx. The project worked with administration and providers at community health centers, public hospitals, and health department-sponsored prenatal and well baby clinics to implement policies and procedures which would promote breastfeeding and to improve the level of attitudes, knowledge and skills of all professional staff in relation to breastfeeding. Due to the size of the population and the project's limitations, activities were chosen that would have a long term effect, and not necessitate the continuous presence of the team at a health facility. The team developed a program of professional education on The Art and Science of Breastfeeding and made recommendations and changes in an agency's policy and procedures. In addition to the professional education component, the team worked with health care facilities to develop and implement policies and procedures which were conducive to the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198026.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Infants Breastfeeding mothers, Low income population

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. 2019. Teledentistry: How technology can facilitate access to care. Reno, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 5 pp. (White paper)

Annotation: This paper presents information about how technology can facilitate access to oral health care. Barriers to access are described, including lack of insurance coverage, transportation difficulties, low income, and an insufficient number of dentists who participate in Medicaid. The paper provides a definition of teledentistry, and its role in filling these gaps is discussed. Challenges associated with the use of teledentistry are described, and methods are presented.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Rural population, Teledentistry, Oral health

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2018. Improving oral health care services in rural America: Policy brief and recommendations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the state of oral health in rural America. It explains why improving access to oral health care in rural communities is important; provides background information; discusses barriers to accessing oral health care in rural communities, federal efforts, and policy considerations; and offers policy recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Federal programs, Low income groups, Oral health, Rural population

Probst JC, Jones KM. 2017. Trends in rural children's health and access to care. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 2 items. (Findings brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a study that used three waves of the National Survey of Children's Health (2003, 2007, 2011-12) to create a portrait of the changing status of rural and urban children across the 2003–2013 decade. It focuses on the demographics of rural children, their financial access to care, reported use of care, and parentally-reported health status. A companion volume, Disparities in Access to Oral Health Care Among Rural Children: Current Status and Models for Innovation, explores trends in children's oral health across the same time frame. A fact sheet is also available.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Financing, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, Health status, Low income groups, Rural population, Trends, Urban population

Lee M. 2017. Connecticut’s Perinatal and Infant Oral Health Quality Improvement Project: Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system data for evaluation. New Haven, CT: Connecticut Voices for Children, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and how PRAMS data can be used for evaluating the Perinatal and Infant Oral Health Quality Improvement project in Connecticut. Topics include births and maternal oral health and health care in Connecticut. Contents include PRAMS questions on maternal oral health, oral health care for mothers by health insurance status, and implications and alternatives for project evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Connecticut Voices for Children, 33 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06510, Telephone: (203) 498-4240 Fax: (203) 498-4242 E-mail: voices@ctvoices.org Web Site: http://www.ctvoices.org

Keywords: Connecticut, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Population surveillance, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Program evaluation, Risk assessment, State programs, State surveys

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Social factors affecting pediatric oral health in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about students' oral hygiene practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages. It discusses third-grade students' access to toothbrushes, toothbrushing and flossing practices, and consumption of sugar-containing beverages, as well as whether they have visited a dentist; middle school students’ toothbrushing practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages; and high school students’ consumption of soda.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 1301 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental caries, Health behavior, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Prevalence, Rural population, Social factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Sugar

Lee J, Schroeder S. 2016. Oral health care service in North Dakota community health centers. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines oral health services provided to North Dakota residents by federally funded community health centers (CHCs) and their satellite sites. Contents include information and data on state and CHC population demographics such as income status, health insurance status, and race/ethnicity; sources of CHC revenue; and CHC dental vs. medical costs per visit and per patient.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 1301 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community health centers, Costs, Dental care, Geographic factors, Health care delivery, Low income groups, North Dakota, Oral health, Rural population, State programs, Uninsured persons, Work force

Holicky A. 2016. Florida's burden of oral disease surveillance report (upd.). Tallahassee, FL: Florida Department of Health, Public Health Dental Program, 62 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information on the burden of oral disease in Florida, highlights oral health disparities associated with specific populations, and describes resources and programs for improving oral health. Topics include state and national objectives, the societal and economic impact of oral disease, risk and protective factors, work force capacity and diversity, and use of oral health care.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, Public Health Dental Program, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin A14, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1724, Telephone: (850) 245-4333 Web Site: http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/community-health/dental-health/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Disease prevention, Florida, Health disparities, Health objectives, Health services delivery, Health status, Infants, Life course, Low income groups, Older adults, Oral health, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Prevalence, Program improvement, Protective factors, Risk factors, Special health care needs, State initiatives, State programs, Statistical data, Work force

Schroeder S, Fix N. 2016. Oral health programs in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes programs and initiatives working to improve the health status of underserved populations in North Dakota. The brief provides the program’s or initiative's name, managing agency, mission, population served, and dates of operation. The brief also discusses state, professional, and work force supports needed to increase access to oral health care and use of oral health services and improve oral health literacy.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 1301 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Financing, Health literacy, Local initiatives, Low income groups, North Dakota, Older adults, Oral health, Policy development, Preventive health services, Program descriptions, Reimbursement, Rural populations, Work force

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Pediatric oral health disparities in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about oral health disparities among third grade students, middle school students, and high school students in North Dakota. Charts present data on tooth decay rates by race and National School Lunch Program status, dental visits in the past 12 months by race, and number of cavities by race. Recommendations for preventing tooth decay and improving oral health among children and adolescents from minority groups and among those from families with low incomes are included.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 1301 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental care, Dental sealants, Fluorides, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health status, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Oral health, Population surveillance, Preventive health services, Screening, State surveys, Statistical data, Students

Langelier M, Rodat C, Moore J. 2016. Case studies of 6 teledentistry programs: Strategies to increase access to general and specialty dental services. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from six case studies of organizations using teledentistry across the United States. Contents include background on the facilitators of telehealth and teledentistry, the benefits of teledentistry, a description of teledentistry modalities, the history and current use of teledentistry services, a description of the project methods and findings, and elaboration on common themes. The appendices contain the case study briefs and protocol and a table describing regulation of teledentistry by state.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Case studies, Costs, Financing, Health care utilization, Low income groups, Model programs, Oral health, Regulations, Research, Rural populations, Service coordination, Technology, Teledentistry, Training, Underserved communities, Work force

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry. 2016. Nebraska state oral health assessment & dental disease burden report. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 57 pp

Annotation: This document reviews the history of oral health in Nebraska, compares current disease status with national trends, describes needs and existing resources, and identifies areas of focus for overcoming disparities. Topics include public policy and the oral health work force, improving disease surveillance, increasing access to care, enhancing community-based prevention, and elevating public education and oral health promotion.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, NE 68509, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 Web Site: http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/Dental-Health.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community based services, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health objectives, Health promotion, Health status, Life course, Low income groups, Measures, Nebraska, Needs assessment, Oral health, Policy development, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Public health education, State programs, Statewide planning, Tobacco use, Vulnerability, Work force

Oral Health Colorado. 2015. Smart mouths, smart kids: Improving dental health for Colorado students. Nederland, CO: Oral Health Colorado, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides information and resources on assessing the feasibility of initiating school- linked oral health services and designing and building a sustainable school oral health pro- gram. Contents include resources for generating ideas, assessing community needs, creating a budget, developing a business plan, providing a rationale for activities, framing an idea, build- ing a program, and maintaining and sustaining a successful school oral health program. The toolkit also includes a data application (a targeted and focused electronic health record) that can be used to monitor children’s oral health status over time.

Contact: Oral Health Colorado, P.O. Box 1335, Nederland, CO 80466, Telephone: (303) 258-3339 E-mail: deborah@oralhealthcolorado.org Web Site: http://www.oralhealthcolorado.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Colorado, Community based services, Dental care, Low income groups, Minority groups, Oral health, Preventive health services, Relationships, Rural population, School aged children, School linked programs, State programs, Sustainability

Kelly S, Anderson L. 2014. The New Hampshire 2013–14 Third Grade Healthy Smiles-Healthy Growth Survey: An oral health and body mass index assessment of New Hampshire third grade students. Concord, NH: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health Services, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a statewide survey on the oral health, height, and weight status of students in third grade in New Hampshire. Contents include the survey background, a description of children participating in the oral health screening, and height and weight measurements, methods, and results. It includes data on children participating in the survey by county and statewide prevalence of tooth decay experience, dental sealants, treatment urgency, and overweight and obesity. Data are presented by sex and National School Lunch program participation at the school level and region level.

Contact: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Oral Health Program, 29 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301-3852, Telephone: (603) 271-4535 Secondary Telephone: (800) 852-3345, ext. 4535 Fax: (603) 271-4506 E-mail: http://business.nh.gov/EmailContact/EmailContact.aspx?a=cdpc&b=Chronic%20Disease%20Prevention%20and%20Control Web Site: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/oral/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Body height, Body weight, Data collection, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Geographic regions, Health status, Low income groups, New Hampshire, Obesity, Oral health, Population surveillance, School age children, Screening, Sex characteristics, State surveys

O'Hare W. 2014. Rural children increasingly rely on Medicaid and state child health insurance programs for health insurance. [Washington, DC]: First Focus, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on differences in health insurance coverage and type among children residing in metropolitan areas vs. those residing outside of these areas. Topics include child health insurance trends from 2000 to 2012; source of health insurance; children who lack health insurance; children in families with low incomes; and differences by state, county, and congressional district.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children's Health Insurance Programs, Comparative analysis, County programs, Health insurance, Low income groups, Medicaid, Metropolitan areas, Rural population, State programs, Trends

Clark J. 2013. Snapshot of oral health in South Dakota. Pierre, SD: South Dakota Department of Health, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data on state epidemiological capacity to monitor trends over time and document improvements in oral health among the residents of South Dakota. Topics include child and adult oral health, state demographics, health professional shortages, access to oral health care, mobile services, Healthy People 2020, early care guidelines, chronic disease and oral health, oral cancer, and water fluoridation. Sources and references; reports on surveillance, prevention, workforce, and disease burden; and conclusions are provided.

Contact: South Dakota Department of Health, Oral Health Program, 600 East Capitol Avenue, Pierre, SD 57501-2536, Telephone: (605) 773-3361 Secondary Telephone: (800) 733-2301 Web Site: http://doh.sd.gov/prevention/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adults, American Indians, Cancer, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Health objectives, Infants, Low income groups, Oral health, Population surveillance, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, South Dakota, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends, Water, Work force

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.