Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (195 total).

Peoples MD. n.d.. The role of maternity and infant care projects in reducing low weight births. Unpublished manuscript, 39 pp.

Annotation: This paper gives a historical overview of the Maternity and Infant Care (MIC) projects enabled through amendments to Title V of the Social Security Act in 1963. The paper presents available data on MIC project accomplishments, with particular emphasis on the relationship of the projects to the incidence of low birth weight. Topics include: the evolution of MIC projects; administration and financing; objectives of the projects; eligibility; coverage of women and infants at risk; quality of care; effects on the use of care and low birth weight; and cost. The difficulties in evaluating these projects is also discussed, including methodological problems and issues of interpretation. A list of references is provided. Tables with information on the projects and evaluations of these projects are provided at the end of the paper.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, History, Low birthweight infants, Prenatal care, Prevention programs

Calkins R. n.d.. Planning and Establishment of a Parent-Child Development Center=Family Based Education Centers: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate Center for Development of Early Education, 50 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model integrated service system of educational, health, and social service programs for families of Hawaiian children (prenatal to age 5 years) who are disproportionately at risk for health, social, and educational handicaps. Four Native Hawaiian Family Based Education Centers were established, with three core educational components: A home visiting program, a traveling preschool program, and a center-based preschool. Activities included conducting an extensive assessment of community needs and developing ongoing ties with institutions of higher learning in the State. Strong health promotion and social service programs complemented the educational focus, and a case management system helped families assess their own goals in each of these areas. Community participation and ownership of the program were critical components. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147023.

Keywords: Community-Based Education Programs, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Education, Family-Based, Hawaiians, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Learning Disabilities, Low Birthweight, Parents, Prenatal Care

Dimperio D. n.d.. Interconceptional Support of Women at High Risk for Low Birthweight [Final report]. Gainesville, FL: North Central Florida Maternal and Infant Care Project, 36 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to reduce the incidence of low birthweight by improving the preconceptional health of women who were at high risk for delivering a low birthweight infant. High-risk women were identified at delivery and were followed for 2 years. Client services were then provided by community health workers, who made home visits and developed a risk reduction plan for each client. Intervention protocols were developed for each risk factor and involved referral to the appropriate resource, followup to ensure client compliance, and reinforcement of professional counseling or supplemental teaching. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196848.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Services, Florida, High risk groups, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Indigent Patients, Infant Mortality, Intervention, Low Birthweight, WIC Program

Mailloux S. n.d.. Improved Prenatal Care Utilization and Birth Outcome Project [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 80 pp.

Annotation: This project surveyed 3000 postpartum Massachusetts women in order to identify barriers to, components of, and levels of participation in prenatal care, and to collect data on the social context of women's lives during pregnancy. Various interventions with high risk women at four demonstration sites were evaluated and compared. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-144236.

Keywords: High risk pregnancy, Hispanics, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Poland M. n.d.. Increasing Access to Prenatal Care Through Problem Identification and Program Evaluation [Final report]. Detroit, MI: Wayne State University, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed high infant mortality rates in Detroit and Wayne County as the general area of concern. The problems of high infant mortality rates and access to prenatal care were addressed over 3 years through a program of technical assistance to the Detroit/Wayne County Infant Health Promotion Coalition. The coalition, comprised of 36 public and private agencies, was established to address the high infant mortality rate through identification of contributing factors and development of programs to reduce these factors. Process objectives included: (1) identifing barriers to prenatal care through a review of relevant literature; (2) focus group discussions with health professionals and clients; (3) development of surveys of prenatal patients and new mothers with review of their medical charts; and (4) provide technical assistance in evaluating ongoing and proposed outreach efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196863.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Greene C. n.d.. Reducing High Infant Mortality in Southeast Louisiana [Final report]. Slidell, LA: Slidell Memorial Hospital Charities, Inc., 29 pp. pp.

Annotation: The project goal was to decrease the infant mortality rate in the target area to the national average by the end of the 3-year project period. The impact objective was to decrease the incidence of low birthweight to 6.5 percent and continue that downward trend to meet the U.S. Surgeon General's goal of 5 percent by the year 2000, and to increase Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment screenings to 80 percent of eligible children. The process objectives were to develop a one-stop perinatal and pediatric health facility, to draw St. Tammany Parish women into early prenatal care through aggressive outreach, and to develop a program of education and community support for indigent families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121875.

Keywords: EPSDT, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Motor Vehicle Crashes, One Stop Shopping, Prenatal Care, Unintentional Injuries

Ronan L. n.d.. A Demonstration Model of Risk-Appropriate Prenatal Care System to Reduce the Incidence of Low Birthweight in Maine [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Medical Care Development, Inc. , 52 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce infant morbidity and mortality due to low birthweight, and to demonstrate a cost-effective prenatal care program which was integrated into the existing system and can be duplicated in other states. Project objectives included: reducing the incidence of low birthweight newborns in the project; reducing the incidence of women who engage in high-risk behaviors during their pregnancy; instituting a model prenatal education, counseling, referral, and followup program in physicians' offices and other sites; and enhancing the education and counseling skills of prenatal care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103258.

Keywords: Counseling, Education of Health Professionals, Education of Patients, High risk pregnancy, Infant Morbidity, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Referrals

Meis P. n.d.. Prevention of Preterm Birth in Northwest North Carolina [Final report]. Winston-Salem, NC: Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University, 42 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to reduce the incidence of low birthweight birth in women receiving prenatal care from public and private health care providers in twenty counties in northwest North Carolina (North Carolina Perinatal Region II). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Low birthweight prevention programs, Pregnant women

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

[Connecticut Coalition to Improve Birth Outcomes]. 2015. Connecticut plan to improve birth outcomes. [no place: Connecticut Coalition to Improve Birth Outcomes], 87 pp.

Annotation: This document provides recommendations and strategies for improving birth outcomes in Connecticut. Contents include the list of organizations represented on the Connecticut Coalition to Improve Birth Outcomes and how they used policy analysis tools to identify priorities and recommendations, and the Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network that supports the strategies outlined in the plan. Topics include addressing socioeconomic factors, making the healthy choices the easy choice, protecting individuals, implementing evidence-based interventions in clinical settings, and providing individual or public educational messages and support. Information about the perinatal landscape, emerging issues, and suggestions for using the plan are also included.

Contact: Community Foundation of Greater New Haven, 70 Audubon Street, New Haven, CT 06510-9755, Telephone: (203) 777-2386 Fax: (203) 787-6584 E-mail: contactus@cfgnh.org Web Site: http://www.cfgnh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coalitions, Collaboration, Connecticut, Ethnic groups, Health disparities, Infant mortality, Infants, Low birthweight, Networking, Outcome and process assessment, Perinatal care, Pregnant women, Preterm birth, Program improvement, Service integration, Statewide planning, Systems development

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2015. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #3: Perinatal regionalization. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #3: Perinatal Regionalization--percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants born in a hospital with a Level III+ neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Hospitals, Literature reviews, Low birthweight infants, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Children's Health Care Quality Measures Core Set Technical Assistance and Analytic Support Program. 2014. Strategies for using vital records to measure quality of care in Medicaid and CHIP programs. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 5 pp. (Technical assistance brief; no. 4)

Annotation: This technical assistance brief discusses strategies for accessing vital records for quality measurement and improvement efforts related maternal and infant health care in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. The brief also gives guidance and describes resources available to states for linking vital records and Medicaid/CHIP data to increase states' capacity to report two measures in the core set of children's health care quality measures: low birth weight rate and Cesarean section rate.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Children's Health Insurance Program, Data linkage, Low birthweight, Measures, Medicaid, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Technical assistance, Vital statistics

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Figlio DN, Guryan J, Karbownik K, Roth J. 2013. The effects of poor neonatal health on children's cognitive development. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 55 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18846)

Annotation: This paper discusses the results of a study on children born in Florida from 1992 to 2002, and the effect of birth weight on cognitive development from kindergarten through middle school. Study methodology is reviewed and results are discussed in the following categories: heavier versus lighter twins; testing; results by grade; differences by genetics, gender, maternal race, ethnicity and immigrant status; and family socioeconomic status. Topics also include birth weight discordance, school quality and the effect of birth weight on test scores, and birth weight gaps at kindergarten entry. A bibliography and statistical data conclude the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Florida, Learning, Low birthweight, Newborn infants, School readiness, State surveys, Statistical data, Young children

Region IV Network for Data Management and Utilization. 2012. Consensus in Region IV: Woman and infant health indicators for planning and assessment. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Health Services Research Center, 1 v.

Annotation: [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, CB# 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 966-5011 E-mail: contact@schsr.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.schsr.unc.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Data collection, Health statistics, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, MCH programs, Neonatal mortality, Perinatal health, Perinatal mortality, Region IV, SPRANS, Southern United States, Statistics

Heisler EJ. 2012. The U.S. infant mortality rate: International comparisons, underlying factors, and federal programs. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the high U.S. infant mortality rate (IMR) relative to other developed countries and efforts to reduce the IMR. The report identifies a number of causes of U.S. infant mortality but focuses on low birthweight and short-gestational-age births because the United States has relatively high and increasing rates of these births and research has found that these births can be reduced through policy interventions.The report first examines international IMR comparisons and discusses geographic variation in state IMRs. Next, the report examines mothers' demographic characteristics and various health system characteristics that may influence the U.S. IMR. The report then describes a number of federal programs that may indirectly reduce the IMR. Finally, the report summarizes federal initiatives included in the Affordable Care Act that may reduce infant mortality.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Gestational age, Health care reform, Infant mortality, International health, Legislation, Low birthweight, Program improvement, Research, Statistics

Washington State Department of Health and Department of Social and Health Services. 2011. Key indicators of perinatal health for Washington residents. [Olympia, WA]: Washington State Department of Health, 25 pp.

Annotation: This document provides key information to identify perinatal health issues and help guide decision-making by the Washington State Department of Health and the Department of Social and Health Services. The indicators were derived from Washington State birth, fetal death, and death certificate data, the First Steps Database, and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. The report includes highlights, a list of areas of concern, and series of key indicator tables. A list of sources is included.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, Office of Maternal and Child Health, Assessment Unit, P.O. Box 47835, Olympia, WA 98504-7835, Telephone: (360) 236-3533 E-mail: mchassess.support@doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cesarean section, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Medicaid, Perinatal health, Pregnancy, Smoking during pregnancy, Statistics, Washington, Women's health

National Healthy Start Association. 2011. 2011-2014 strategic plan. Baltimore, MD: National Healthy Start Association, 1 p.

Annotation: The 2011 document describes the mission and vision statement of the National Healthy Start Association and outlines four goals with objectives. The 2002 and 2005 strategic plans for the NHSA provides background information on infant mortality, low birthweight and racial disparities in perinatal outcomes, the Healthy Start program, NHSA and its accomplishments to date, the process undertaken to develop a 3-year strategic plan, and the strategic plan itself, including objectives and specific action steps. The strategic plan includes appendices: a map of the Healthy Start communities and NHSA's committee descriptions. An organizational chart and a list of members of the board of directors is also included.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health programs, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, National programs, Perinatal health, Strategic plans

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.