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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: How do young adults fare and what characteristics are associated with a lower-risk transition?. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 12 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief identifies patterns and transitions during emerging adulthood and the likelihood that young adults will experience a lower-risk transition to adulthood. Topics include differences between groups by gender, race and ethnicity, and nativity status; transition patterns over time; and implications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Data, Longitudinal studies, Risk factors, Transitions, Trends, Young adults, Youth, Youth development

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of supportive relationships and regular religious involvement. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term implications of supportive relationships and religious involvement, by assessing whether young adults who reported having positive relationships with their parents, teachers, or friends or who reported weekly religious involvement when they were adolescents were more likely to later have lower-risk transitions to adulthood relative to young adults who had not reported these positive social connections as adolescents, even taking sociodemographic background and negative childhood experiences into account. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Longitudinal studies, Relationships, Religion, Research, Risk factors, Social factors, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development

Duncan GJ, Kirkendall NJ, Citro CF, eds; National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2014. The National Children's Study 2014: An assessment. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 147 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a Congressionally-mandated review of the design of the National Children's Main Study. Topics include the national probability sample's overall sample size and design, the use of hospitals and birthing centers as the primary sampling unit, relative size of the prenatal and birth strata in the probability sample, the size of the supplemental convenience sample, optimal use of sibling births, use of health care providers to refer prospective participants, proposed study visit schedule with emphasis on more frequent data collection in pregnancy and early childhood, proposed approach to assess health and developmental phenotypes, and proposed approach to define and characterize health disparities. Conclusions and recommendations, including information on logistical and resource constraints, are also provided.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Longitudinal studies, MCH research, National initiatives, Research methodology, Research reviews

Abram KM, Choe JY, Washburn JJ, Teplin LA, King DC, Dulcan MK, Bassett ED. 2014. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors among detained youth. U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 11 pp. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin )

Annotation: This bulletin examines suicidal thoughts and behaviors among 1,829 children and adolescents (ages 10 to 18) in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal study of children and adolescents detained at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago, IL. Contents include a description of the study literature review and methods, and a discussion of the findings. Topics include hopelessness, thoughts about death and dying, thoughts about suicide, suicide plan, telling someone about suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorders that may increase the odds of suicide attempts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attempted suicide, Children, Juvenile justice, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychiatric disorders, Risk factors, Self destructive behavior, Statistical analysis

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term influence of moderate-to-severe depressive or suicidal symptoms in adolescence on the transition to adulthood. The brief describes an analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) to assess the likelihood that participants were positioned to make a healthy transition to adulthood by their mid/late twenties and early thirties. Topics include factors predicting moderate or multiple problems and higher-risk transitions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Depression, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychosocial predictors, Risk factors, Substance use, Suicide, Transitions, Young adults

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. [2012]. The National Children's Study. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,

Annotation: This web site describes the National Children's Study, a study to examine the effects of environmental influences on the health and development of more than 100, 000 children in the United States, following them from birth through age 21. The goal of the study is to improve the health and well-being of children. The brochure provides an overview of the study, discusses what makes the study different from other U.S. health studies, explains how to get involved in the study, and provides contact information for more information about the study.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Environmental influences, Longitudinal studies, Research

Chatterji P, Makowitz S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2011. Early maternal employment and family wellbeing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 48 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17212)

Annotation: This study examines the effects of maternal employment on family well-being, measured by maternal mental and overall health, parenting stress, and parenting quality. Using longitudinal data from the Study on Early Child Care (SECC) conducted by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the authors first estimate the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes when children are 6 months old and then use dynamic panel data models to examine the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes during the first 4.5 years of children’s lives. Detailed findings are presented in table format.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Child health, Employment, Family health, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Parenting, Research, Working mothers, Young children

Turney K. 2010. Labored love: Examining the link between maternal depression and parenting bahaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 36 pp. (Fragile Families working paper: 2010-02-FF)

Annotation: This working paper explores the link between maternal depression and parenting behavior using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (a joint effort by research centers at Columbia and Princeton Universities to collect data on a cohort of nearly 5, 000 at-risk children born between 1998 and 2,000). The paper compares the results of studies that have used different correlation models, pointing out why the findings might vary. Expanding on earlier research, the paper discusses the correlation between maternal depression and behaviors such as child neglect and parenting stress, focusing on marital status and other variables that might influence the affects of maternal depression on the well-being of children.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: At risk children, Behavior, Child health, Data analysis, Depression, Longitudinal studies, MCH research, Maternal health, Outcome evaluation, Parenting, Risk factors

Herbst CM, Tekin E. 2010. The impact of child care subsidies on child well-being: Evidence from geographic variation in the distance to social service agencies. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 59 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16250)

Annotation: This paper examines how state and federal child care subsidies intended to move economically disadvantaged parents from welfare to work might impact the well-being of children. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, the authors identify the relationships of child care subsidies with child development using the geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home in order to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process as a factor. The authors posit that an unintended consequence of a child care subsidies that are conditional on parental employment might de-emphasize the importance of child care quality.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Behavior problems, Child care, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Economic factors, High risk children, Longitudinal studies, Research, Unintentional, Welfare programs

Craigie T, Brooks-Gunn J, Waldfogel J. 2010. Family structure, family stability and early child wellbeing. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study --a nationally representative cohort of children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 -- to distinguish the effects of family structure at birth from family stability over time on child health, cognitive, and socio-emotional outcomes. The authors' findings indicate that family structure and stability are important to all child outcomes but that the health outcomes of children born to married or cohabiting parents are more adversely affected by changes in family structure over time. The study looks at two models: one that measures family structure at birth only and a second that measures possible changes in family structure since birth. Descriptive statistics for outcome measures and mediators are provided in tables, which include variables such as asthma, obesity, aggressive behavior, anxiety/depressive behavior, income, father involvement, and parental depression.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior development, Biological parents, Child health, Cognitive development, Comparison groups, Data, Families, Longitudinal studies, Measures, Models, Outcome evaluation, Single parents, Statistics, Young children

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2009. Science says: Socio-economic and family characteristics of teen childbearing . Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 41)

Annotation: This fact sheet presents new findings on the socioeconomic and family characteristics of adolescents who give birth to or father a child and examines commonly held beliefs about this population among American adults. The findings are based on 2009 public opinion polling data and an analysis conducted by Child Trends using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a nationally representative longitudinal survey of students. Included are statistics on the family structure and the family income of adolescents who had reported ever giving birth.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Data analysis, Longitudinal studies, Sampling studies, Socioeconomic factors

Soni A. 2009. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children (5-17): Use and expenditures, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5 pp. (MEPS statistical brief, no. 276)

Annotation: This statistical brief presents estimates on expenditures for and use of ambulatory care and prescribed medications to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder among children ages 5-17 in the U.S. civilian population who have not been institutionalized. The estimates are based on the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) –- a nationally-representative longitudinal survey of families and individuals, their medical providers, and employers across the United States. Average annual estimates are shown by type of service and source of payment.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Attention deficit disorder, Child mental health, Drugs, Expenditures, Health services, Longitudinal studies, National surveys, Primary care, Statistics

National Institute of Mental Health. 2001. Teenage brain: A work in progress. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a brief overview of research into brain development during adolescence. The research highlighted is based on studies of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of a child's brain as it progresses through puberty and the adolescent years.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 01-4929.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child development, Data analysis, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Research

Sastry N, Ghosh-Dastidar B, Adams J, Pebley A. 2000. The design of a multilevel longitudinal survey of children, families, and communities: The Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 22 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes the sampling design of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Study, a new survey of children, families, and neighborhoods in Los Angeles County. The survey was designed explicitly to support multilevel studies on a number of topics in neighborhood influences, including child development, residential mobility, and welfare reform. The report highlights the main design and analytical considerations that shaped the study, as well as an in-depth statistical investigation of the survey's ability to support multilevel analyses.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Community surveys, Families, Longitudinal studies, Research design, Surveys

Hart B, Risley TR. 1995. Meaningful differences in the everyday experience of young American children. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 268 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a study of children ages one to three, their family interactions, their language development, and the effects that variations in these had on their subsequent intelligence.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com $22.00.

Keywords: Child development, Intelligence, Language development, Longitudinal studies, Low income groups, Parenting

Alarcon O, Erkut S, Coll CG, Vazquez Garcia HA. 1994. An approach to engaging in culturally-sensitive research on Puerto Rican youth. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, Center for Research on Women, 14 pp. (Working paper series; no. 275)

Annotation: This paper studies two culturally sensitive longitudinal studies of the development of Puerto Rican children and adolescents growing up in the continental United States. The paper defines the objectives of the research studies, identifies the measures that will be used to monitor the studies, explains the background of the studies, and discusses the findings to date. One study focuses on the socio-emotional development of this group; the other analyzes their overall health and growth. The two studies consider factors such as acculturation, family functioning and values, perceived discrimination, the child's perception of color, the receptivity of the social environment, and language issues. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, Wellesley Center for Women (WCW), 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481-8259, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Secondary Telephone: (781) 283-2837 Contact Phone: (617) 235-0320 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Contact E-mail: oalarcon@wellesley.edu, or rknopf@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Development, Emotional development, Health, Longitudinal studies, Psychosocial development, Puerto Ricans

Brandon PD. 1992. The determinants of market child care use among female-headed households. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Institute for Research on Poverty, 28 pp. (Institute for Research on Poverty discussion paper; no. 985-92)

Annotation: This study tests whether the child care choices of female-headed households differ because the mechanisms leading to female-headship status are distinct, thereby differentially conditioning the set of child care choices and mothers' abilities to pay. The variables examined include marital status; economic constraints; kin networks; and work history. Data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS'72), in particular its fifth follow-up survey, conducted in 1986.

Contact: University of Wisconsin, Institute for Research on Poverty, Social Science Building, Room 3412 , 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-6358 Fax: (608) 265-3119 E-mail: djohnson@ssc.wisc.edu Web Site: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/ $3.50; prepayment required.

Keywords: Child care services, Economic factors, Family characteristics, Family economics, Followup studies, Longitudinal studies, Working mothers

Sunshine JH, Dicker M. 1990. Determinants of total family charges for health care: United States, 1980. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 66 pp. (National medical care utilization and expenditure survey: Series C, analytical report; no. 8)

Annotation: This report analyzes data from the family data files of a longitudinal study of 5,000 families made in 1980. For three socioeconomic groups (older families, younger lower-income families, and younger better-off families), this report investigates the effects on total family health charges of various family characteristics, both socioeconomic and health related.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Family health, Health care costs, Health insurance, Longitudinal studies

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics. 1990. 1990 longitudinal followup (LF) of mothers in the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics, 141 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the proceedings of the National Center for Health Statistics and Ford Foundation Planning Conference on the 1990 longitudinal follow-up survey of the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. It includes the following materials: conference agenda and invitees list, rationale for the survey, survey structure, and questionnaires for mothers, pediatric care providers, and hospitals.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Contact Phone: (301) 436-8954 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available in libraries.

Keywords: Conferences, Followup studies, Infant health, Longitudinal studies, Maternal health, National Maternal and Infant Health Survey, Questionnaires

Werner EE, Smith RS. 1989. Vulnerable but invincible: A longitudinal study of resilient children and youth. New York: Adams, Bannister, Cox, 228 pp.

Annotation: This is the third book published based on information gathered from the Kauai Longitudinal Study. The first book, "Children of Kauai," examined the effects of cumulative stress on children ranging from perinatal factors to poverty and inadequate caregiving; the effects included developmental problems, poor school achievement, physical disabilities, and intellectual retardation, among others. The second, "Kauai's Children Come of Age," examined the correlates of those stressors by focusing on the children's mental health problems and anti-social behavior. This book considers the children in the study who, despite the same limiting factors, managed to develop into competent young adults, who have demonstrated the necessary resilience to overcome their vulnerability. The book provides an overview of the study and the methodology, and examines sex differences in vulnerability and resiliency. It then considers the personal characteristics and the caregiving environments for the vulnerable but resilient children for each cycle of life, infancy, toddlerhood, middle childhood, and late adolescence. The book examines the interrelationships between significant child and caregiver variables to determine the implications for research and social action.

Contact: Adams, Bannister, and Cox, 460 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10027, Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-937431-03-6.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Hawaiians, Longitudinal studies, Resilience, Vulnerability, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.