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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2016. Anti-bullying policies and enumeration: An infobrief for local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brief for local education agency staff describes enumeration in the context of anti-bullying policies, referring to any specific listing of traits or characteristics of students that could be the basis of bullying. Topics include support for and concerns about enumeration, research on the effectiveness of enumerating anti-bullying policy, and key considerations and actions for effective implementation of all anti-bullying policies.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Local government, Policy development, Public policy, Research, School districts, State legislation, Students

Southeastern Michigan Health Association, Center for Population Health. 2016. Livingston County's Road to Community Health: Oral health. [Howell, MI]: Livingston County Department of Public Health, 2 pp. (Livingston County's road to community health series, no. 7)

Annotation: This issue examines the oral health status of residents in Livingston County, Michigan, as reported in the community health status assessment, compared to state and national data. Topics include the percentage of residents who did not have a dental visit in the past year, the percentage who did not have dental insurance by income, and recommendations for and use of oral health care services among children.

Contact: Livingston County Department of Public Health, 2300 E Grand River Avenue, Suite 102, Howell, MI 48843, Telephone: (517) 546-9850 Fax: (517) 546-6995 Web Site: https://www.livgov.com/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, County programs, Dental care, Dental insurance, Health care utilization, Health status, Local government, Low income groups, Michigan, Needs assessment, Oral health, Preventive health services

National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk. 2015. Creating and maintaining good relationships between juvenile justice and education agencies. Washington, DC: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, 3 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet is designed to assist state and local justice and education agency administrators in creating strong working relationships that make high-quality education programs within juvenile justice settings possible. Topics include the importance of working together, the biggest challenges to good relationships, and working together toward a meaningful and sustainable partnership.

Contact: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, American Institutes of Research, Washington, DC Web Site: http://www.neglected-delinquent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Educational programs, Juvenile justice, Local government, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resources for professionals, State departments of education, Sustainability

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Building an ethics infrastructure in local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for accreditation coordinators and local health department (LHD) practitioners outlines steps to advance public health ethics at LHDs. Topics include why it's important to understand and promote public health ethics, considerations for establishing an ethics committee, and Public Health Accreditation Board ethics requirements.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, City health agencies, County health agencies, Ethics, Local government, Policy development, Public health infrastructure

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2014. Capacity of local health departments to track, administer, and promote seasonal influenza vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief highlights the extent to which local health departments (LHDs) provide and have the capacity to track, administer, and promote influenza (flu) vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Contents include data on the percentage of LHDs providing adult and child immunizations for the period 2005-2013 and findings from key informant interviews on seasonal flu vaccination rates, administering and promoting vaccinations, and partnerships. Reimbursement issues; the emergence of retail pharmacies in the immunization market; strategies used to promote flu vaccination; and opportunities, challenges, and recommendations are also discussed.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Health agencies, Influenza, Local government, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Public health infrastructure, Vaccines

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Building a formal ethics infrastructure at local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines six recommendations for how local health departments should create infrastructure to address ethical issues that arise in public health practice. The appendices contain an in-depth summary of the process used to the develop the recommendations and examples of formal ethics infrastructures.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Ethics, Local government, Policy development, Public health infrastructure

Georgia Health Policy Center, National Network of Public Health Institutes. 2013–. Leading through health system change: Planning tool. Atlanta, GA: Georgia Health Policy Center, 1 v.

Annotation: This collaborative planning tool is designed to help state and local health departments understand and apply adaptive thinking to health care reform with the goal of improving population health. Contents include a series of three guided practices that can be used by an individual or a team. The interactive tool includes prompting questions and sample courses of action, but allows the user to present their own questions and solutions. An introductory video is also available from the website.

Contact: Georgia Health Policy Center, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3992, Atlanta, GA 30302-3992, Telephone: (404) 413-0314 Fax: (404) 413-0316 E-mail: ghpc@gsu.edu Web Site: http://ghpc.gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Evaluation, Health care reform, Local government, Policy analysis, Program improvement, Program planning, Research, State health agencies, Technical assistance

Prevention Research Center in St. Louis. 2012-. LEAD-public health project (Local Evidence for Affecting Decisions about Public Health). St. Louis, WA: Washington University St. Louis, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a project to examine the use of, barriers to, and methods for enhancing evidence-based programs and policies (EBPP) in local health departments. Contents include the project goals, dates, and target audience; implications for research and practice; project staff, partners, and funders; and a list of related publications and presentations. A series of issue briefs on topics such as workforce development, leadership, organizational culture, relationships and partnerships, and financial practices are included. The website also contains the national survey instrument, an information brief, and the case study qualitative survey guide.

Contact: Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, 621 N. Skinker Boulevard, Campus Box 1006, St. Louis, MO 63130, Telephone: (314) 935-0121 E-mail: prcstl@wustl.edu Web Site: http://prcstl.wustl.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Case studies, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Local government, Model programs, National surveys, Policy development, Public health agencies, Research, Work force

National Association of Local Boards of Health. 2012. The governance functions [The six functions of public health governance]. [Kimberly, WI]: National Association of Local Boards of Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model of six functions for which a public health governing entity is responsible. Topics include policy development, resource stewardship, legal authority, partner engagement, continuous improvement, and oversight.

Contact: National Association of Local Boards of Health, 563 Carter Court, Suite B, Kimberly, WI 54136, Telephone: (920) 560-5644 Fax: (920) 882-3655 E-mail: NALBOH@Badgerbay.co Web Site: http://www.nalboh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, Governing boards, Government programs, Government role, Health policy, Legal responsibility, Local government, Policy development, Program improvement, Public health, Public private partnerships

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2012. Roadmap to a culture of quality improvement: A guide to leadership and success in local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to local health departments (LHDs) on progressing through six phases or levels of quality improvement (QI) integration until a culture of QI has been reached and can be sustained. For each phase, the document presents common organizational characteristics and incremental strategies for transitioning to the next stage. The document also describes six foundational elements of a QI culture that LHDs should cultivate over time.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Evolution, Leadership, Learning, Local government, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Sustainability, Systems development, Transitions

Libbey P, Miyahara B. 2011. Cross-jurisdictional relationships in local public health: Preliminary summary of an environmental scan. [Princeton, NJ]: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an environmental scan commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to gain a better understanding of the issues involved in creating formal collaborative relationships between local health departments residing in different communities. The report examines the types of relationships that currently exist between health departments—how they are structured, how and why they were created, and how well they are working. It also looks at the language used by stakeholders to define and describe these relationships. The report, which is based on information gathered during site visits and in-person visits with key stakeholders, summarizes barriers to improving public health capacity through cross-jurisdictional relationships and highlights considerations towards moving forward with cross-jurisdictional collaboration.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community based services, County health agencies, Local government, Public health infrastructure, Relationships

National Association for County and City Health Officials. 2011. Local public health workforce benchmarks. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 49 pp.

Annotation: This report offers a blueprint for the development of benchmarks to assist local health departments in meeting current staffing standards and workforce development needs. The report reviews historical and currently available measures of the local public health workforce, which serves as a context for the assessment of local public health factors that may affect staffing and composition. Tables include statistics on occupational categories relevant to local public health departments; trends in the numbers of state and local health department employees in the United States; and numbers of full-time local health department employees based on population served, clinical service characteristics, and other variables. The report includes descriptions of data and information sources that can be useful in developing benchmarks along with examples of potential workforce benchmarks. Recommendations for developing local public health benchmark applications are included.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Local government, Measures, Public health agencies, Staff development, Standards, Work force

CityMatCH. 2010. History, highlights and hope: Shattering the U.S. infant mortality glass ceiling. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This website contains an audiorecording and presentation slides from a webinar held on June 17, 2010, to discuss the history of U.S. efforts to reduce infant mortality and what can and should be done to eliminate remaining racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. It describes some advances and successes in reducing infant mortality; current and emerging science, research, and vision for the future; and the role of local public health and community organizations in infant mortality reduction efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Barriers, Community role, Government role, History, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Sociocultural factors

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2006, 2000, 1994. School health policies and programs study: Questionnaires. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health,

Annotation: These questionnaires are designed to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. Components include health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services and foods and beverages available at school, healthy and safe school environment, physical school environments, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement in schools.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Food service, Health education, Health policy, Health services, Local government, Physical education, Policies, Programs, Questionnaires, Schools, State government, Survey tools, Teachers

Hofrichter R, ed. 2006. Tackling health inequities through public health practice: A handbook for action. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 252 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is intended for local health departments (LHDs), provides ideas and examples for how LHDs can strengthen their ability to influence the root causes of health inequities. The purposes of the book are to (1) provide a conceptual framework, raise questions, and spur thought for exploring the nature and causes of health inequity and what to do about them and (2) offer a knowledge base, resources, case studies, and suggestions that can help reduce inequities. The book is divided into two main parts. Part 1 presents introductory material, and part 2 provides examples of successessful practices across the country. The book includes six appendices that offer exercises, selected resources and references, and articles on such topics as measuring health equity, communications, and how social injustice becomes embodied in differential disease and mortality rates.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Ethnic factors, Health, Income factors, Local government, Local programs, Low income groups, Public health, Race factors, Social factors

Morgan MA, Lifshay J. 2006. Community engagement in public health. Martinez, CA: Contra Costa Health Services, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper introduces a conceptual framework for community engagement in public health. It presents the Ladder of Community Participation as a way to illustrate a range of approaches that can be used to engage communities around both traditional and emerging public health issues. The paper highlights examples of Contra Costa Health Services' community engagement practices and, based on lessons learned, offers suggestions to help other local health departments enhance their own activities.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Community coordination, Community health services, Community participation, Community programs, Community role, Local government, Models, Outreach, Public health infrastructure

Bosland J. 2005. Strengthening America's families: An agenda for municipal leaders. Washington, DC: National League of Cities, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on municipal leaders' role in strengthening American's families. Part 1 of the paper discusses how mayors, city council members, and other key city leaders can help mobilize, organize, and lead family-strengthening efforts focused on local families and the neighborhoods in which they live. Part 2 offers a set of strategies for launching and sustaining efforts to strengthen families. Part 3 looks more closely at some specific things city leaders can do to help create important connections for families. The paper contains a wide range of practical ideas for how municipal action can strengthen families.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, City government, Communities, Community programs, Domestic violence, Early childhood development, Education, Employment programs, Families, Family support, Health, Housing, Local government, Neighborhoods, Nutrition, Safety, School age child care

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2004. Nutrition education: USDA provides services through multiple programs, but stronger linkages among efforts are needed. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the following questions: (1) What key actions can officials take to increase the likelihood of success in nutrition education? (2) Do U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), state, and local officials incorporate these actions into their nutrition education efforts during program design? (3) Do these officials incorporate these actions during service delivery? And (4) Do these officials incorporate these actions during program evaluation? The report is divided into the following sections: (1) results in brief, (2) background, (3) several actions are key to performance-based management and successful nutrition education, (4) although USDA generally incorporates the key program design actions likely to contribute to success, establishing linkages among programs is difficult, (5) programs incorporated the service delivery actions in different ways and to varying extents but faced similar challenges to incorporating them, (6) programs generally did not incorporate key nutrition education evaluation actions, leaving officials with limited information about program results, (7) conclusions, (8) recommendations for executive action, and (9) agency comments. Three appendices include the scope and methodology of the study, nutrition education goals for key USDA programs, and General Accounting Office contacts and staff acknowledgments. Statistical information and other information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Department of Agriculture, Local government, Nutrition education, Program development, Program evaluation, Service delivery systems, State government

Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Committee on Poison Prevention and Control. 2004. Forging a poison prevention and control system. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 354 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the role of poison control services within the context of the larger public health system, the injury prevention and control field, and the fields of general medical care and medical and clinical toxicology. It also examines how poison control centers function relative to the functions performed by other health care agencies and government organizations at the federal, state, and local levels. The book, which includes an executive summary, is presented in three parts. Part 1 provides an overview of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Poison Prevention and Control's proposal for a future poison prevention and control system. Part 2 reviews the historical development of the poison control network, the current status of poisoning as a public health problem, and the principal functional elements of the system. Part 3 summarizes arguments for a new poison prevention control system by focusing on the committee's conclusions and recommendations. Statistical information and other information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. Two appendices include a list of contributors and committee and staff biographies. The book also includes a list of references and an index. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09194-2.

Keywords: Federal government, Health agencies, Health care systems, Injury prevention, Local government, Poison control centers, Poisoning, Public health, State government, Toxicology

Meyer JA, Silow-Carroll S, Waldman E. 2004. Community Voices: Lessons for national health policy. Washington, DC: Community Voices, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights some promising local approaches to improving access to health care for vulnerable communities. These approaches could be used as models for large-scale or federal reforms. The brief describes ways that states and the federal government can directly support local efforts as well as reduce the burden on communities by expanding public and private coverage on a statewide basis. The brief concludes by emphasizing the importance of community initiatives while pointing to the need for a broader, multi-level, fundamental reform of the U.S. health care system in the long run.

Contact: Community Voices, Health Care for the Underserved, Morehouse School of Medicine, National Center for Primary Care, , 720 Westview Drive, S.W., Atlanta, GA 30310, Telephone: (404) 756-8914 Fax: (404) 752-1198 Web Site: http://communityvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community programs, Federal government, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Local initiatives, Low income groups, State government, Uninsured persons, Vulnerability

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.