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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (33 total).

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Building an ethics infrastructure in local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for accreditation coordinators and local health department (LHD) practitioners outlines steps to advance public health ethics at LHDs. Topics include why it's important to understand and promote public health ethics, considerations for establishing an ethics committee, and Public Health Accreditation Board ethics requirements.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accreditation, City health agencies, County health agencies, Ethics, Local government, Policy development, Public health infrastructure

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Adaptive leadership and public health. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1 video (5 min., 25 sec.).

Annotation: This video examines adaptive leadership as a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation. Topics include how local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of the health system.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Health care reform, Health systems agencies, Leadership, Local health agencies, Organizational change, Policy development, Political systems, Public private partnerships, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Transitions

Bouri N, Minton K, Jolani N, Rubin S. 2014. Riding the mobile wave: What local health departments need in order to adopt social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Baltimore, MD: UPMC Center for Health Security; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 41 pp., exec. summ. (5 pp.).

Annotation: This document reports findings from a study to determine what organizational factors local health department staff perceive as necessary to support their use of social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Contents include the study methods, findings, and recommendations for policy and practice. Topics include in-house capacity, leadership support and policies, legal and security issues, and audiences. Case studies are also included.

Contact: UPMC Center for Health Security, 621 E. Pratt Street, Suite 210, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (443) 573-3304 Fax: (443) 573-3305 Web Site: http://www.upmchealthsecurity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Confidentiality, Disaster planning, Health agencies, Legal issues, Local agencies, Policy analysis, Policy development, Research, Social media, Technology

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2014. Capacity of local health departments to track, administer, and promote seasonal influenza vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief highlights the extent to which local health departments (LHDs) provide and have the capacity to track, administer, and promote influenza (flu) vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Contents include data on the percentage of LHDs providing adult and child immunizations for the period 2005-2013 and findings from key informant interviews on seasonal flu vaccination rates, administering and promoting vaccinations, and partnerships. Reimbursement issues; the emergence of retail pharmacies in the immunization market; strategies used to promote flu vaccination; and opportunities, challenges, and recommendations are also discussed.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Health agencies, Influenza, Local government, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Public health infrastructure, Vaccines

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) champions: The local MCAH capacity building project experience. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a multi-year demonstration project to build local health department's (LHD's) technical knowledge and leadership abilities for maternal and child health through blended learning techniques including in-person capacity building trainings and virtual coaching, networking, and peer-to-peer sharing. Contents include information about the project framework and outcomes, participating LHDs, lessons learned, and recommendations for future capacity building projects is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Leadership, Local MCH programs, MCH training, Networking, Organizational change, Peer education, Public health infrastructure, Technical assistance, Work force

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2014. Building a formal ethics infrastructure at local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines six recommendations for how local health departments should create infrastructure to address ethical issues that arise in public health practice. The appendices contain an in-depth summary of the process used to the develop the recommendations and examples of formal ethics infrastructures.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Ethics, Local government, Policy development, Public health infrastructure

Georgia Health Policy Center, National Network of Public Health Institutes. 2013–. Leading through health system change: Planning tool. Atlanta, GA: Georgia Health Policy Center, 1 v.

Annotation: This collaborative planning tool is designed to help state and local health departments understand and apply adaptive thinking to health care reform with the goal of improving population health. Contents include a series of three guided practices that can be used by an individual or a team. The interactive tool includes prompting questions and sample courses of action, but allows the user to present their own questions and solutions. An introductory video is also available from the website.

Contact: Georgia Health Policy Center, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 3992, Atlanta, GA 30302-3992, Telephone: (404) 413-0314 Fax: (404) 413-0316 E-mail: ghpc@gsu.edu Web Site: http://ghpc.gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Evaluation, Health care reform, Local government, Policy analysis, Program improvement, Program planning, Research, State health agencies, Technical assistance

Prevention Research Center in St. Louis. 2012-. LEAD-public health project (Local Evidence for Affecting Decisions about Public Health). St. Louis, WA: Washington University St. Louis, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a project to examine the use of, barriers to, and methods for enhancing evidence-based programs and policies (EBPP) in local health departments. Contents include the project goals, dates, and target audience; implications for research and practice; project staff, partners, and funders; and a list of related publications and presentations. A series of issue briefs on topics such as workforce development, leadership, organizational culture, relationships and partnerships, and financial practices are included. The website also contains the national survey instrument, an information brief, and the case study qualitative survey guide.

Contact: Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Washington University in St. Louis, 621 N. Skinker Boulevard, Campus Box 1006, St. Louis, MO 63130, Telephone: (314) 935-0121 E-mail: prcstl@wustl.edu Web Site: http://prcstl.wustl.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Case studies, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Local government, Model programs, National surveys, Policy development, Public health agencies, Research, Work force

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2012. Roadmap to a culture of quality improvement: A guide to leadership and success in local health departments. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to local health departments (LHDs) on progressing through six phases or levels of quality improvement (QI) integration until a culture of QI has been reached and can be sustained. For each phase, the document presents common organizational characteristics and incremental strategies for transitioning to the next stage. The document also describes six foundational elements of a QI culture that LHDs should cultivate over time.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org

Keywords: City health agencies, County health agencies, Evolution, Leadership, Learning, Local government, Organizational change, Outcome and process assessment, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Sustainability, Systems development, Transitions

Libbey P, Miyahara B. 2011. Cross-jurisdictional relationships in local public health: Preliminary summary of an environmental scan. [Princeton, NJ]: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an environmental scan commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to gain a better understanding of the issues involved in creating formal collaborative relationships between local health departments residing in different communities. The report examines the types of relationships that currently exist between health departments—how they are structured, how and why they were created, and how well they are working. It also looks at the language used by stakeholders to define and describe these relationships. The report, which is based on information gathered during site visits and in-person visits with key stakeholders, summarizes barriers to improving public health capacity through cross-jurisdictional relationships and highlights considerations towards moving forward with cross-jurisdictional collaboration.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community based services, County health agencies, Local government, Public health infrastructure, Relationships

National Association for County and City Health Officials. 2011. Local public health workforce benchmarks. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 49 pp.

Annotation: This report offers a blueprint for the development of benchmarks to assist local health departments in meeting current staffing standards and workforce development needs. The report reviews historical and currently available measures of the local public health workforce, which serves as a context for the assessment of local public health factors that may affect staffing and composition. Tables include statistics on occupational categories relevant to local public health departments; trends in the numbers of state and local health department employees in the United States; and numbers of full-time local health department employees based on population served, clinical service characteristics, and other variables. The report includes descriptions of data and information sources that can be useful in developing benchmarks along with examples of potential workforce benchmarks. Recommendations for developing local public health benchmark applications are included.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Local government, Measures, Public health agencies, Staff development, Standards, Work force

Salinsky E. 2010. Governmental public health: An overview of state and local public health agencies. Washington, DC: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 28 pp. (Background paper no. 77)

Annotation: This paper describes the government public health infrastructure at both the state and local levels in terms of organizational structure, activities, financing, work force, partnerships, and performance-improvement efforts. The paper also provides an overview of public health.

Contact: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 2131 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 872-1390 E-mail: nhpf@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.nhpf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Local programs, Public health, Public health agencies, State programs

Ajayi , Ablorth-Odjidja A, Cox E, Phillips C, Toby T. 2009. Meeting the needs of pregnant and parenting teens: Local health department programs and services. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the importance of addressing the needs of pregnant and parenting adolescents in order to improve their heath and life outcomes and those of their children. The report highlights four local health departments that are implementing promising approaches to providing services for these adolescents and are working to prevent the negative consequences often associated with adolescent childbearing and parenting. Recommendations are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Child health, Health agencies, Local initiatives, Prevention

American Association for Community Dental Programs. [2006]. A guide for developing and enhancing community oral health programs. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 54 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to local public health agencies in developing, integrating, expanding, or enhancing community oral health programs. Steps include (1) mobilize community support, (2) assess needs and existing resources, (3) plan the program, (4) implement the program, (5) evaluate the program, and (6) participate in policy development and research. Throughout the guide, resources related to each step are identified and described. Also included are four appendices: (1) resources organized by steps, (2) list of resources by topic area, (3) effective community and individual preventive measures for dental caries prevention and a comparison of five effective community prevention programs for dental caries, and (4) crosswalk between 10 essential public health services, essential public health services to promote oral health in the United States, and dental public health competencies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Association for Community Dental Programs, , , 635 West Seventh Street, Suite 309, Cincinnati, OH 45203, Telephone: (513) 621-0248 Fax: (513) 621-0288 E-mail: info@aacdp.org Web Site: http://www.aacdp.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Families, Local programs, Manuals, Oral health, Parents, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Public health, Public health agencies, Public policy

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Public Health. 2005. Sample dental sealant agency protocol. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Public Health, 15 pp.

Annotation: These protocols serve as blueprints for local health department staff to use in implementing dental sealant programs for children in Iowa. The protocols include sample policies and procedures, standing medical orders, and resources that may be adapted to meet local needs.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Oral Health Program, Division of Public Health, P.O. Box 2659, Madison, WI 53701-2659, Fax: (608) 266-3483 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/oral-health/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Guidelines, Local programs, Oral health, Prevention, Protocols, Public health, Public health agencies

Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Public Health. 2005. Sample fluoride varnish application program for children: Agency protocol. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Public Health, 19 pp.

Annotation: This sample agency protocol can serve as a blueprint for fluoride-varnish application programs for children in public health settings. The purpose of the sample is to provide local health departments with an example that the health departments can adapt for their particular settings. Included in the sample protocol are sample policies, sample procedures, standing medical orders, and resources.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Oral Health Program, Division of Public Health, P.O. Box 2659, Madison, WI 53701-2659, Fax: (608) 266-3483 Web Site: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/oral-health/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Dental caries, Fluorides, Guidelines, Local programs, Oral health, Prevention, Protocols, Public health, Public health agencies

Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Committee on Poison Prevention and Control. 2004. Forging a poison prevention and control system. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 354 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the role of poison control services within the context of the larger public health system, the injury prevention and control field, and the fields of general medical care and medical and clinical toxicology. It also examines how poison control centers function relative to the functions performed by other health care agencies and government organizations at the federal, state, and local levels. The book, which includes an executive summary, is presented in three parts. Part 1 provides an overview of the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Poison Prevention and Control's proposal for a future poison prevention and control system. Part 2 reviews the historical development of the poison control network, the current status of poisoning as a public health problem, and the principal functional elements of the system. Part 3 summarizes arguments for a new poison prevention control system by focusing on the committee's conclusions and recommendations. Statistical information and other information is presented in tables and figures throughout the book. Two appendices include a list of contributors and committee and staff biographies. The book also includes a list of references and an index. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09194-2.

Keywords: Federal government, Health agencies, Health care systems, Injury prevention, Local government, Poison control centers, Poisoning, Public health, State government, Toxicology

Family Health Outcomes Project. 2003. Developing an effective MCH planning process: A guide for local MCH programs. (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Family Health Outcomes Project, 223 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this manual is to assist local public health agencies in conducting a needs-based, rational planning and resource allocation process. It describes processes generic to all planning efforts at the local level and provides case examples specific to maternal and child health programs that are required to conduct a formal needs assessment and planning process every 3-5 years to receive their annual block grant funds. The manual includes the following chapters: (1) building a constituency for community assessment and date-based planning, (2) community health assessment, (3) conducting a formal problem analysis and identifying effective interventions, (4) developing objectives, performance measures, and an action plan, (5) program evaluation and performance monitoring, (6) putting it all together: creating a planning document, and (7) available tools for public health core data functions. Extensive appendices include public health indicators and their use, California county data resources on the Web, and much more.

Contact: Family Health Outcomes Project, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine, 500 Parnassus Ave. Room MU-337, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-5283 Contact Phone: (415) 476-5283 Fax: (415) 476-6051 E-mail: fhop@fcm.ucsf.edu Contact E-mail: fhop@itsa.ucsf.edu Web Site: http://fhop.ucsf.edu/fhop $30.00, includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Block grants, Community health services, Community programs, Evaluation, Intervention, Local MCH programs, Local government, Needs assessment, Planning, Public health agencies, Resource allocation

Strobino DM, Koontz A, Silver GB, Allston A. 2002. The roles local health departments play in the organization and provision of perinatal services. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the features and components of perinatal health systems in local communities and, more specifically, the roles local health departments play in ensuring these components for pregnant women and newborns. The findings describe five essential public health functions for pregnant women and infants: (1) promoting access to or provisions of services to clients; (2) promoting collaborations and partnerships; (3) policy formation; (4) ensuring the capacity and competency of the perinatal health workforce; and (5) informing and educating the public. Charts, tables, and graphs provide statistical information throughout the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health agencies, Health care delivery, Local MCH programs, Local initiatives, Newborn infants, Perinatal health, Perinatal services, Pregnant women

Strobino DM, Koontz A, Silver GB, Allston AA, Grason HA. 2002. The roles local health departments undertake in serving non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 2 pp. (Snapshot)

Annotation: This two-page brief describes activities in which local health departments (LHDs) and MCH programs engage on behalf of reproductive-age women. Report topics include provision, coordination, and assurance of access to services; collaborations and advocacy; data use; quality assurance, monitoring, and accountability; and interactions with managed care organizations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health agencies, Health care delivery, Local MCH programs, Local initiatives, Perinatal health, Service coordination, Women’s health

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.