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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

DeFrancis Sun B, Pickett OK. 2013. Culturally competent services: Professional resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This brief lists major resources for information on cultural and linguistic competence and sources of non-English health education materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Culturally competent services, Linguistic competence

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs. 2005. The role of cultural competence in family-centered care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses how cultural competence is intrinsically connected to family-centered care, the goal of which is to ensure the health and well-being of children and their families through a respectful family-professional partnership. The fact sheet also includes a definition of cultural and linguistic competence and a list of principles of cultural competence.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (301) 945-9842 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-topics/children-and-youth-special-health-needs Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Families, Family centered care, Family centered services, Health care, Linguistic competence

National Center for Cultural Competence. 2005. Infusing cultural and linguistic competence into health promotion training. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 1 DVD (90 min.).

Annotation: This 90-minute training DVD is designed to help experienced health promotion trainers ensure that their approaches with diverse populations address culture and language in an effective, appropriate, and respectful manner. The DVD addresses (1) rationale for cultural and linguistic competence, (2) frameworks for achieving cultural and linguistic competence, (3) values, principles, and practices of culturally and linguistically competent health promotion training, (4) how the Health Belief Model can be used to infuse cultural and linguistic competence into training, (5) principles and models for community engagement, and (6) issues in the content and logistics of trainings. The DVD can be used alone or in conjunction with a set of training activities designed to enhance the content, which are available from the National Center for Cultural Competence Web site. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National SUID/SIDS Resource Center , Georgetown University, 2115 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 601***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20007-2292, Telephone: (866) 866-7437 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-7466 E-mail: info@sidscenter.org Web Site: http://www.sidscenter.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, DVDs, Health promotion, Language, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Training materials

Bronheim S. [2004]. Cultural competence: It all starts at the front desk. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 7 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet discusses the importance of cultural competence at the front desk. Negative consequences of front desk staff's failure to use culturally and linguistically competent practices are listed. Examples of individuals who have encountered culturally or linguistically inappropriate practices at the front desk, and how these experiences affected them, are included. The pamphlet also includes suggested guidelines that agencies, practices, clinics, and hospitals can follow to address the cultural and linguistic competence of the front desk.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Agencies, Clinics, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Hospitals, Language barriers, Linguistic competence

Hepburn KS. 2004. Building culturally and linguistically competent services to support young children, their families, and school readiness. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 134 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit provides guidance, tools, and resources that to assist communities in building culturally and linguistically competent services, supports, programs, and practices related to young children and their families to promote early childhood development and school readiness. It includes definitions for cultural and linguistic competence, the importance for communities, and provides information on diversity and the cultural context of the family and community, understanding the impact of culture on child development, planning and implementing services, implications for early childhood services and school readiness, and strategies for preparing personnel and implementing services and supports. The kit is meant to support a holistic approach and encourage cultural and linguistic competence across all systems that serve young children and their families in the health, mental health, early intervention, and other service systems. A bibliography concludes the tool kit.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Cultural competence, Early childhood development, Early intervention services, Family support services, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Mental health services, Preschool children, Program development, School readiness, Service delivery, Young children

Goode TD, Dunne C. 2003, 1999. Rationale for cultural competence in primary health care [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 11 pp. (Policy brief; 1)

Annotation: This paper discusses why there is a compelling need for cultural competence in health care and policy making implications for primary health care organizations and programs. It also provides a checklist to facilitate the development of culturally and linguistically competent public health care policies and structures. A Spanish version is available from the Web site. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Health policy, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Minority groups, Spanish language materials

NARAL Pro-Choice America Foundation, Proactive Policy Institute. 2003. Breaking barriers: A policy action kit promoting the reproductive health of women of color and low-income women. Washington, DC: NARAL Pro-Choice America Foundation, 119 pp.

Annotation: This action kit is intended to help state advocates and policymakers use policy as a means to help women of color and low-income women access the full range of reproductive care options. The kit identifies a variety of proactive policy initiatives, provides model legislative and regulatory language, and suggests strategies to promote these initiatives. Chapter topics in reproductive health care include reducing racial and ethnic disparities; promoting cultural and linguistic competence; expanding and improving access to family planning services under Medicaid, affordable abortion services, obstetric services; and screening, treatment, and prevention programs for sexually transmitted and HIV programs. The appendix includes a directory of research and advocacy organizations to aid in developing a policy campaign.

Contact: NARAL, Pro-Choice America , 1156 15th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 973-3000 Fax: (202) 973-3096 Web Site: http://www.naral.org $20.00; also available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural sensitivity, Family planning, HIV, Health policy, Linguistic competence, Low income groups, Minority groups, Model legislation, Reproductive health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social policy, Women's health

Bronheim S, Sockalingam S. 2003. A guide to choosing and adapting culturally and linguistically competent health promotion materials. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for providers, agencies, community organizations, and funders on how to ensure that health promotion materials reflect the principles and practices of cultural and linguistic competence. The document includes information on (1) values and guiding principles for ensuring cultural and linguistic competence in health promotion messages and materials and (2) steps for choosing or adapting culturally and linguistically competent health promotion materials. References are provided along with resources on general health promotion, assessing materials for low literacy readers, creating alternate formats for individuals with disabilities, and materials for diverse populations on a variety of health issues, both in general and related to targeted health disparity areas.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Ethnic groups, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Low literacy materials, Minority groups

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and American Public Human Services Association. 2003. Bridging cultures and enhancing care: Approaches to cultural and linguistic competency in managed care. Washington, DC: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and American Public Human Services Association, 38 pp.

Annotation: This document comprises proceedings from the conference, Bridging Cultures and Enhancing Managed Care, held on May 30, 2002, in Chicago, IL. The document is divided into four main sections: (1) introduction, (2) cultural competency: the basics, (3) successful practices in managed care, and (4) plenary session: an interactive session opportunity to discuss challenges in delivering culturally and linguistically competent health care. The proceedings include several figures.

Keywords: Conferences, Culturally competent services, Health care, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Managed care

Goode T, Jackson V. 2003. Getting started ... and moving on ... planning, implementing, and evaluating culturally and linguistic competency for comprehensive community mental health services for children and families: Implications for systems of care. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 4 pp.

Annotation: This checklist -- which is one in a series designed to assist organizations and systems of care to develop policies, structures, and practices that support cultural and linguistic competence -- focuses on systems of care and organizations concerned with the delivery of services and supports to children and youth with emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders and their families. The checklist offers a list of actions that these organizations or systems of care can put into practice. Each item includes a description. The checklist also includes a list of definitions and a reference list.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior disorders, Children, Communities, Culturally competent services, Emotional instability, Evaluation, Families, Health care systems, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Mental disorders

Bronheim S. 2003. Infusing cultural and linguistic competence into the multiple systems encountered by families following the sudden, unexpected death of an infant. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 11 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief provides a rationale for incorporating cultural and linguistic competence in the many programs, agencies, and systems that families and caregivers encounter following the sudden, unexpected death of an infant. The brief discusses the growing diversity of the U.S. population, the continuing disparities in infant mortality, and the impact of a loss on families, caregivers, providers, and communities. The brief also provides a checklist for each of the many layers of the system to consider in pursuing cultural and linguistic competence. Finally, the brief includes a short section on linking policy and practice. The brief concludes with a reference list.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Demography, Family centered services, Grief, Infant death, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Program development, Public agencies, SIDS

COSMOS Corporation. 2003. Developing a self-assessment tool for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in local public health agencies: Final report. Bethesda, MD: COSMOS Corporation, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents the results of the project titled Developing a Self-Assessment Tool for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Local Public Heath Agencies (LPHAs), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health. The report introduces the issue, discusses the methodology for developing a CLAS self-assessment tool, and provides project results and recommendations. References are included. The report contains two exhibits, which include select definitions of cultural competence and culturally appropriate health care services and a conceptual framework for assessing CLAS in LPHAs. The report also includes seven appendices: membership lists, the CLAS conceptual framework, a telephone interview protocol, questionnaires and forms, and a CLAS in managed care organizations study data collection plan.

Contact: COSMOS Corporation, 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Suite 420, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 215-9100 Fax: (301) 215-6969 Web Site: http://www.cosmoscorp.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Culturally competent services, Final reports, Health care services, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Public health agencies

Paez K. 2002. Planning culturally and linguistically appropriate services: A guide for managed care plans. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; [Baltimore, MD]: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 119 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this guide is to assist plans in addressing shifting demographic trends by offering an approach to defining the cultural and linguistic needs of multi-ethnic members and then to develop culturally and linguistically appropriate services to meet these needs. In particular, guidance is provided to Medicare+Choice organizations that choose to assess the cultural and linguistic needs of their membership for their 2003 national quality assessment and performance improvement project. The first section explores the CLAS (culturally and linguistically appropriate services) assessment and planning. Topics include preparing the CLAS assessment and planning team; assessing the diversity of plan members and the community; assessing the managed care plan; and identifying gaps, determining priorities, and briefing senior leaders. Part two outlines three broad areas of focus for improving CLAS: (1) providing linguistics services, (2) improving cultural competence on multiple levels, and (3) developing a diverse workforce. The guide concludes with references and resources.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Health services delivery, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Managed care, Manuals, Needs assessment, Program assessment, Program development, Translations

Asian Pacific Health Care Venture. 2002. A functional manual for providing linguistically competent health care services as developed by a community health care center. Los Angeles, CA: Asian Pacific Health Care Venture, 108 pp.

IQ Solutions. 2001. National standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in health care: Final report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health, 180 pp.

Annotation: This report recommends national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care. Part one of this report provides background on the importance of cultural competence in health care in the United States, reviews the role and interest of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its Office of Minority Health in cultural competence, and briefly summarizes the process of developing national standards for CLAS in health care. Additional topics include the report's purpose, intended audience, organizing principles, implications of CLAS standards, and recommendations in facilitating implementation. Part two contains the 14 CLAS standards, with commentary that defines key concepts and issues. The third part summarizes the process for developing and revising the CLAS standards over three years. The fourth part is a glossary of terms found within the standards and a bibliography of sources used in this final report. The appendices include rosters of those who attended the three regional meetings, as well as the National Project Advisory Committee membership.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Guidelines, Health care delivery, Linguistic competence, Minority groups, Service delivery, Standards

LTG Associates and Resources for Cross Cultural Health Care. 2001. Cultural competence works: Using cultural competence to improve the quality of health care for diverse populations and add value to managed care arrangements. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 81 pp.

Annotation: This publication reports on a Cultural Competence Works competition sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Center for Health Services Financing and Managed Care in the fall of 1998. The document provides a summary of culturally competent practices as reported by nominees in the competition and follow-up discussions with program personnel. The examples included are meant to illustrate the range of culturally competent methods and practices that nominees have implemented in order to enhance their ability to serve linguistically and culturally diverse populations. Where appropriate, nominees also describe the impact that these services have had on their relationships with managed care organizations. Topics include defining culture; the nomination review process; defining and addressing service needs; collaboration with other agencies and managed care; and securing adequate and sustainable funding. The appendices include program abstracts and contact information for the nominations selected for recognition and a brief list of resources on both cultural competence and managed care.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Ethnic factors, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Managed care, Program descriptions, Program evaluations, Sensitivity training, Service delivery

Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2001. Linguistic diversity and early literacy: Serving culturally diverse families in Early Head Start. Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 16 pp. (Technical assistance paper no. 5)

Annotation: This technical assistance paper discusses the promotion of early literacy in Early Head Start programs serving culturally diverse families, some of whom may not speak English or who may speak English as a second language. The paper discusses child development and early literacy, family literacy, program management systems to support cultural diversity and early literacy, and transition issues: moving from Early Head Start to preschool settings. Tips for putting ideas into practice in Early Head Start programs are included. The paper also includes two program profiles and a list of resources.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Cultural diversity, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Families, Infant development, Language, Linguistic competence, Literacy, Preschool children, Young children

Goode T, Sockalingam S, Brown M, Jones W. 2000. A planner's guide...: Infusing principles, content and themes related to cultural and linguistic competence into meetings and conferences. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 7 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist meeting and conference planners in infusing principles, content and themes related to cultural and linguistic competence into meetings and conferences. The guide includes sections on planning the content of the meeting, planning logistics, evaluation questions, definitions, and lists of additional resources. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Conferences, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Meetings, Planning

Goode T, Sockalingam S, Brown M, Jones W. 2000. Linguistic competence in primary health care delivery systems: Implications for policy makers. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 5 pp. (Policy brief; 2)

Annotation: This policy brief discusses barriers that limit access to health care by individuals with limited English proficiency and reasons why linguistic competency in primary health care delivery systems is important. It also contains a list of selected federal laws and regulations that mandate linguistic competence and a checklist of measures an organization can use to determine if their policies promote linguistic competence. Available in Spanish from the Web site. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Minority groups, Spanish language materials

Lonner TD. 2000. Constructing the middle ground: Cultural competence in Medicaid managed care. Seattle, WA: Cross Cultural Health Care Program, 383 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the gap in knowledge of culturally competent care and service of the Medicare managed-care population, that is, the insured poor, particularly ethnic minorities, linguistic minorities, and newly immigrant and refugee populations. Chapter topics include cultural competence in Medicaid managed care, defining organizational cultural competence, and a summary of findings and principles. Extensive appendices focus on cultural competence in the Medicaid managed care marketplace; constructing a culturally competent organization; capturing resources and underwriting cultural competence; attaching the organization to the community; creating and maintaining access to needed services; bridging the communications gaps; and advancing cultural competence through customer service. Additional appendices discuss seeing and educating the minority patient; provider perspectives; building clinical cultural competence; and building a culturally competent work force. References and research methods conclude the report.

Contact: Cross Cultural Health Care Program, 4700 South 42nd Avenue, S.W., Suite 580, Seattle, WA 98116, Telephone: (206) 860-0329 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: ccprograms@xculture.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Medicaid managed care, Minority groups, Program development, Resources for professionals, Service delivery

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.