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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 7 (7 total).

Branca P. n.d.. The Care of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia In a System Encompassing Tertiary, Rehabilitative and Home Care [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 13 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was the development of a multilevel model of care for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia that was cost effective, decreased length of hospital stays, and allowed for a physically, emotionally, socially, and developmentally healthier child. Inservice training for staff and parenting workshops were conducted as part of this project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161966.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Children with special health care needs, Coordination of services, Infants, Length of stay, Ventilator dependent

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1997. Beyond the 4th dimension: Assuring quality health care for moms and babies—Proceedings of the scientific summit. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report represents the proceedings of a scientific summit whose purpose was to summarize the state of the art research on early discharge of mothers and infants from the hospitals after the infant's birth and to identify evidence-based and outcomes-focused steps to strengthen America's families. The summit was divided into three panels (maternal, infant, and family) and the report reviews what issues were discussed in each. A review of the current scientific literature is provided as are ethical and legislative perspectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHJ108.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child health services, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Family centered services, Home visiting, Length of stay, Managed care, Maternal health services, Neonatal care, Newborn infants, Patient discharge, Pediatric care, Postpartum care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy

Young KT, Davis K, Schoen C. 1996. The Commonwealth Fund survey of parents with young children. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 132 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a survey taken of 2,000 families with children under three to determine how the health care system can help them insure the health and development of their children. The introduction describes the purpose and methodology of the survey, and presents and discusses the findings on these topics: early hospital discharge patterns, the promotion of breast feeding, the provision of information regarding early childhood development, parents' access to pediatric information and services, stress factors affecting child rearing, the role of parental emotional and mental health, financial pressures, and the parents' preparedness for parenting. Appendices provide profiles of selected parents; and survey charts, highlights, and data tables.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Contact Phone: (212) 535-0400 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child rearing, Early childhood development, Family characteristics, Family economics, Financial support, Knowledge level, Length of stay, Parenting skills, Parents, Physician parent relations, Statistics, Surveys, Young children

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1996. PIC briefing book: The business perspective on maternal and child health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf notebook contains articles, pamphlets, and reports that discuss the corporate world's attitudes, perceptions, and policies on maternal and child health. Topics include the length of stay in hospitals for mothers and infants following birth, breastfeeding in the workplace, women as mothers and parents within the workplace, and school health and school issues. Other topics include health promotion in the workplace, worksite wellness, assuring the quality of health plans, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), and other business issues such as managed care, medical savings accounts, and health purchasing cooperatives. The materials were prepared for the January 1996 meeting of the MCH Partnership for Information and Communication Interorganizational Work Group. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Child health, Employee benefits, Health policy, Hospitalization, Insurance, Length of stay, Managed care, Maternal health, Perinatal care, Policy development, Prenatal care, Quality assurance, Retirement, School health, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1996. Scientific summit: Beyond the fourth dimension . Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 38 pp.

Annotation: This information packet contains material from a June 6–7, 1996, conference held in Washington, D.C., including a participants' list. Other information includes: several articles from various sources concerning the current practice of rapid discharge of mothers and newborns from the hospital; a listing of states and the schedule of pending legislation on the issue of early discharge; and a brief summary of the laws in five states covering discharge of mothers and newborns.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care costs, Length of stay, Newborn infants, Patient discharge, Postpartum care

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1996. Maternity care: Appropriate follow-up services critical with short hospital stays. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information on the implications of early discharge following birth to the health of the mothers and children, and considers the role of followup care as one means of assuring their health. It includes a background analysis indicating that shorter hospital stays are becoming more common and assessing the distribution of the trend. The report considers the implications of early discharge and presents recommendations on incorporating such policies within a larger maternal care context including a heightened emphasis on followup care.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-96-207.

Keywords: Infant health, Length of stay, Perinatal care, Postpartum care, Women's health

Pass KA, Levy HL, eds. 1995. Early hospital discharge: Impact on newborn screening. Atlanta, GA: Council of Regional Networks for Genetic Services, 291 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings of a March 31–April 1, 1995, conference held in Washington, D.C., address the problems encountered by newborn screening programs when specimens must be taken early in an infant's life because of early hospital discharge policies due to the demands of managed care. Papers discuss the current situation in newborn screening, concerns with specific diseases, and potential strategies. Diseases discussed are PKU, sickle cell disease, homocystinuria, maple syrup urine disease, congenital hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and galactosemia. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Length of stay, Metabolic diseases, Neonatal screening, Patient discharge

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.