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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (29 total).

San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project. n.d.. Including all of us: Caring for children with special needs in early childhood settings—Manual for child care providers. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 218 pp.

Annotation: This manual was developed to accompany an 8-hour class. It introduces the concept of mainstreaming and relates it to the principles of early childhood education and best practice guidelines for caring for children with special needs. Module one includes sections on the importance of working with families, ethical issues, laws protecting children with special needs, typical vs. atypical development, how children learn, suggestions for working with parents are included, and diversity resources. Module two deals with motor development and concludes with a bibliography and references. Module three covers social-emotional development and behavioral issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: San Diego State University, Mainstreaming Project, 6505 Alvarado Road, Suite 108, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-4373 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Child behavior, Child care, Child development, Children with special health care needs, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Families, Learning, Legislation, Mainstreaming, Motor development, Parents, Psychosocial development, Special education

Werner EE. n.d.. Final report: The Kauai Study—Follow-up at adolescence. [Los Angeles, CA: University of California at Los Angeles?], 398 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to present the findings of the fourth phase of a longitudinal study of a multi-racial cohort of youth, born on the island of Kauai, Hawaii in 1955. The results of the first three phases of the study (prenatal period to age 10) were published in the book The Children of Kauai (1971). The purposes of this report are to follow up where the previous study left off at age 10, to document the course of the learning and behavior disorders diagnosed in childhood, to take a look at new problems and new promises in adolescence, to examine a concerned community's response to its at risk youth, to consider factors that contributed to improvement, and to evaluate the predictive power of the diagnostic tools of the previous phases of the study. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Hawaii, Learning disabilities, Reports

Calkins R. n.d.. Planning and Establishment of a Parent-Child Development Center=Family Based Education Centers: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate Center for Development of Early Education, 50 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model integrated service system of educational, health, and social service programs for families of Hawaiian children (prenatal to age 5 years) who are disproportionately at risk for health, social, and educational handicaps. Four Native Hawaiian Family Based Education Centers were established, with three core educational components: A home visiting program, a traveling preschool program, and a center-based preschool. Activities included conducting an extensive assessment of community needs and developing ongoing ties with institutions of higher learning in the State. Strong health promotion and social service programs complemented the educational focus, and a case management system helped families assess their own goals in each of these areas. Community participation and ownership of the program were critical components. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147023.

Keywords: Community-Based Education Programs, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Education, Family-Based, Hawaiians, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Learning Disabilities, Low Birthweight, Parents, Prenatal Care

Haworth SM, Griffen AK. 2016. Including people with disabilities: Public health workforce competencies. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health professionals outlines knowledge and practice skills for including people with disabilities in the core public health functions (assessment, policy development, and assurance). Contents include strategies to meet the competencies and examples of how people with disabilities can be successfully included in public health activities. Topics include disability models across the lifespan, methods used to assess health issues for people with disabilities, how public health programs impact health outcomes for people with disabilities, and implementing and evaluating strategies to include people with disabilities in public health programs. The appendices contain a glossary of terms, resources by topic, academic resources, resources for embedding the competencies into a public health curriculum or training, and information about alignment with other public health competencies and standards.

Contact: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 1000, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 588-8252 Fax: (301) 588-2842 E-mail: aucdinfo@aucd.org Contact E-mail: disabilityinPH@aucd.org Web Site: http://www.aucd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Competence, Disabilities, Inclusion, Learning, Policy development, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Work force

SHAPE America. 2016. Answering frequently asked questions about adapted physical education. Reston, VA: SHAPE America, 20 pp.

Annotation: This guidance document answers common questions about providing physical education services for students with disabilities. The document was developed as a resource for physical educators, adapted physical educators, school district administrators, and parents as they work to provide consistent adapted physical education services for students with disabilities. Contents include descriptions of advocacy resources, legal guidelines, teaching tips, and commonly used motor assessments.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessments, Disabilities, Learning, Legal definitions, Motor development, Physical activity, Physical education, Resources for professionals, School districts, Service delivery systems, Students, Teaching

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education. 2015. Policy statement on inclusion of children with disabilities in early childhood programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 43 pp.

Annotation: This policy statement sets a vision and provides recommendations to states, local educational agencies, schools, and public and private early childhood programs for increasing the inclusion of infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities in high-quality early childhood programs. Contents include information about the scientific base for the benefits of inclusion, the legal foundation for inclusion, challenges to inclusion in early childhood programs, partnering to build a nationwide culture of inclusion, and recommendations for state action.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Federal initiatives, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Infants, Learning, Legal responsibility, Policy development, Program development, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Schools, Young children

National Collaborative on Education and Health Working Group on Chronic Absenteeism. 2015. Addressing the health-related reasons of chronic absenteeism. Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 6 items.

Annotation: This toolkit focuses on preparing educators -- particularly school district decision makers -- with knowledge and practical guidance for creating meaningful change to address health-related chronic absenteeism. Topics include understanding student health needs, addressing the health-related reasons students are absent, building effective partnerships to support student health, and building capacity. A case study on partnering to ensure students have access to school health services is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Community action, Data sources, Environmental influences, Health status, Learning, Needs assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, Program planning, Public private partnerships, School attendance, School districts, Students, Sustainability

Build Initiative. 2014. BUILD/IMLS partnership: Supporting communities through museums and libraries. Boston, MA: Build Initiative, multiple items.

Annotation: This webinar series focuses on efforts to integrate museums and libraries into statewide early childhood systems. Contents include presentations (in .pdf) and recordings on the following topics: tools and methodologies for leveraging strategic connections to local library systems, state government, and early learning organizations and standards; how museums and libraries can be learning resource centers for young children and their families and caregivers; the scope, roles, and functions of state early learning and development systems; and ways to strengthen and work with museums and libraries in intentionally supporting the growth and development of young children and their families and caregivers. State-specific examples from Washington are included.

Contact: Build Initiative, 89 South Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02111, Telephone: (617) 523-6565 E-mail: info@buildinitiative.org Web Site: http://www.buildinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, Integrated information systems, Learning disabilities, Libraries, Public health, Public private partnerships, Service delivery systems, State programs, Statewide planning, Washington, Young children

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing black-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 24 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between black children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime astha diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Blacks, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral Health, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing Hispanic-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 28 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between Hispanic children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime asthma diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Hispanic Americans, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

Learning Disabilities Association of America, National Education Association, and Arc. [2005]. Mercury and learning disabilities: A parent's guide. [Pittsburgh, PA]: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 9 pp.

Annotation: This guide for parents discusses learning disabilities, how to prevent them, and how to reduce their children's risk of exposure to mercury, and thus, possibly, to reduce possible learning disabilites. The guide discusses the causes of learning disabilities, where mercury comes from, and how it affects children. The guide also includes advice for parents, guidelines for identifying learning disabilities, and information about how to test a child for learning disabilities.

Contact: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 4156 Library Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15234-1349, Telephone: (412) 341-1515 Fax: (412) 344-0224 E-mail: info@LDAAmerica.org Web Site: http://www.ldaamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Children, Consumer education materials, Environmental exposure, Environmental pollution, Learning disabilities, Prevention, Screening tests

Clear the Air. [2005]. Mercury and the developing brain. Washington, DC: Clear the Air, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper explains the sources of mercury in the environment and how people are exposed. It describes physical changes that occur in the developing brain due to mercury exposure during pregnancy and how these changes later translate into learning difficulties in school. Endnotes are provided.

Contact: Clear the Air, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Fifth Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 887-1715 Fax: (202) 887-8877 E-mail: info@cleartheair.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Child health, Environmental exposure, Fetal development, Hazardous materials, Infant development, Learning disabilities

Elliott K, Segal LM, Juliano C, Mandel J, Hearne SA. 2005. Birth defects and developmental disabilities: The search for causes and cures. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 31 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report presents an overview of major birth defects and developmental disabilities (autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and learning disabilities), as well as an assessment of some recent public health successes and a look at several ongoing challenges. Conclusions, recommendations, and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes one appendix: a glossary of terms and acronyms.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Cerebral palsy, Congenital abnormalities, Developmental disabilities, Learning disabilities, Public health

Knight JR, Frazer C, Emans SJ, eds. 2001. Bright Futures case studies for primary care clinicians: Child development and behavior. Boston, MA: Bright Futures Center for Pediatric Education in Growth and Development, Behavior, and Adolescent Health, 269 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: This manual is part of a three volume set designed to provide information to teachers about the many facets of the Bright Futures Pediatric Education Project. The first section of this manual presents case studies in child development, specifically delays in development, Down syndrome, and an atypical behavior situation. Section two focuses on the school environment: school readiness, learning disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and recurrent abdominal pain. The third section addresses case studies in physical and sexual abuse, as well as child neglect. The resources section contains sample forms with evaluation questions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Genentech Foundation for Growth and Development]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Fax: xxx E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Contact for cost information. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHN100 (3 vol set.).

Keywords: Attention deficit disorder, Bright Futures, Case studies, Child behavior, Child development, Child health supervision, Child neglect, Delayed development, Diagnosis, Down syndrome, Educational materials, Hyperactivity, Learning disabilities, Physical abuse, Professional education, Program evaluation, School readiness, Sexual abuse

National Center for Health Statistics. 2000-. Summary health statistics for U. S. children: National Health Interview Survey, 19__. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, annual. (Vital and health statistics: Series 10, Data from the National Health Interview Survey)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide national estimates for a broad range of health measures for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population of children under age 18. Estimates are presented for asthma, allergies, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, use of prescription medication, respondent-assessed health status, school-loss days, usual place of medical care, time since last contact with a health professional, selected health care risk factors, and time since last dental contact. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) abstract, (2) introduction, (3) methods, (4) highlights, and (5) references. Two appendices contain technical notes on methods, hypotheses tests, and lists of terms. Statistical information is presented in numerous detailed tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 2003-1541; 2003-1538; 2002-1526; ISBN 0-8406-0589-7.

Keywords: Allergies, Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Dental care, Health surveys, Learning disabilities, Prescription drugs, Risk factors, School attendance, Statistics

University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Mental Health in Schools. 1998. Restructuring boards of education to enhance schools' effectiveness in addressing barriers to student learning. Los Angeles, CA: University of California at Los Angeles, School Mental Health Project/Center for Mental Health in Schools: Training and Technical Assistance, 28 pp. (A center report)

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to encourage school boards to take steps in reforming and restructuring schools. The discussion explores why school boards need to increase their focus on addressing barriers to learning, the benefits accrued from doing so, building an enhanced focus on addressing barriers into a school board's committee structure, and lessons learned from a major district where the board has begun the process. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Contact Phone: (310) 825-1225 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Boards of education, Learning, Learning disabilities, Reports, School districts

University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Mental Health in Schools. 1997. Addressing barriers to student learning: Closing gaps in school/community policy and practice. Los Angeles, CA: University of California, Los Angeles, Center for Mental Health in Schools, 42 pp. (Center policy report)

Annotation: This paper reports work from a summit on barriers to student learning by discussing fundamental gaps in policy and practice; measures to abate economic inequities and restrictive opportunities; primary prevention and early age interventions; identification and amelioration of learning, behavior, emotional, and health problems as early as feasible, ongoing treatment of and support for chronic/severe/ pervasive problems; points of disconnected accountability; implications; and what is next. A list of participants in the summit is included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Contact Phone: (310) 825-1225 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Behavior problems, Child health, Economic factors, Education, Intervention, Learning, Learning disabilities, Policy development

Roberts J. 1996. Otitis Media in Children and Later Language and Learning [Final report]. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 24 pp.

Annotation: Otitis media with effusion (OME) or middle ear disease is one of the most prevalent diseases in early childhood, and many studies have linked it to later language and learning problems. This project examined (1) the relationship between the amount of OME (number of days) with accompanying hearing loss during infancy and the preschool period and patterns of speech, language, and neuropsychological development during the preschool period; and (2) other factors such as stimulation within the home environment or gender that might interact with OME to predict later development of language and learning skills. All participants in the study were African-American children who were in child care settings during infancy; 69 percent were from low-income families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-155030.

Keywords: Language Disorders, Learning Disabilities, Low Income Population, MCH Research, Otitis Media, Preschool Children, Research

Lewis M. 1995. Predicting Preschool Function from Contingency Intervention [Final report]. New Brunswick, NJ: University of Medicine and Dentistry-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, 61 pp.

Annotation: This project determined whether experience with a special early intervention program, focusing on the process of learning itself, was predictive of the cognitive, communicative, and adaptive functioning and motivation of developmentally delayed preschoolers. A group of more than 100 developmentally delayed preschoolers who participated in a special supplemental 3-month contingency intervention program during their first year were seen at 4 years of age. The study provided evidence of the long-term impact of learning to control environment early in life on subsequent functioning. The results have implications for the effective cognitive and physical therapy of the very young disabled child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-177191.

Keywords: Delayed Development, Delayed Development, Early Intervention, Learning Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, MCH Research, Physical Therapy, Preschool Children, Preschool Children, Research

National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities. 1994. Collective perspectives on issues affecting learning disabilities: Position papers and statements. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed, 110 pp.

Annotation: This monograph presents a collection of position papers of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), a national committee of representatives of organizations committed to the education and welfare of individuals with learning disabilities. Each paper provides a response to national issues concerning learning disabilities. In addition to the papers, the monograph provides a comprehensive overview of the NJCLD—its history, primary objectives, and the procedures used to accomplish its goals.

Contact: Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard, Austin, TX 78757-6897, Telephone: (512) 451-3246 Secondary Telephone: (800) 897-3202 Fax: 512-451-8542 E-mail: q@proedinc.com Web Site: http://www.proedinc.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-89079-534-7.

Keywords: Americans With Disabilities Act, Education, Learning disabilities, Service delivery

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.