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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 2016. Managing lead in drinking water at schools and early childhood education facilities. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators and community leaders provides information about ways to limit children's exposure to lead in drinking water in schools and early childhood education facilities. Contents include information about the danger of lead in drinking water, how federal regulation has reduced exposure to lead in drinking water, deciding if a lead testing program is necessary, getting school buy-in for a program, involving external and community partners, preparing and taking lead samples, choosing remediation options, and communicating with the public. Recommendations are also included.

Contact: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, One Michigan Avenue, East, Battle Creek, MI 49017-4012, Telephone: (269) 968-1611 Fax: (269) 968-0413 Web Site: http://www.wkkf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Communication, Community action, Environmental exposure, Lead, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Lead poisoning screening, Regulations, School health programs, Schools, Testing, Water

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

Keyser D, Firth R, Richardson A, Townsend MZ. 2006. Improving childhood blood lead level screening, reporting, and surveillance in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is intended primarily for state and local policymakers, public health officials, health care and health plan providers, local government agencies, and parents interested in improving childhood blood lead level screening, reporting, and surveillance in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, provides a synthesis of findings from a study conducted to examine the current status of childhood blood level screening, reporting, and surveillance in Allegheny County and to offer recommendations for improving these processes. Each chapter of the report integrates relevant information from the background study of the literature, database analyses, and interviews and focus groups, as appropriate. Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 provides a review of existing data. Chapters 3 and 4 examine the screening and reporting and surveillance processes. Chapter 5 concludes and offers recommendations. The report includes three appendices: (1) population of children and median housing age in Allegheny County, (2) advisory group members, and (3) a comparison of risk factors for lead poisoning.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $20.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3945-8; MG-423-HHR.

Keywords: Child health, Lead poisoning screening, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Public health, Risk factors, Screening, Young children

Deinard A. 2002. Does Education Limit Lead Burden?: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 51 pp.

Annotation: Lead abatement is a costly and disruptive secondary prevention procedure that benefits only those who live in the abated home. Primary prevention interventions—which may be less expensive and reach more people—are necessary. This study assessed the efficacy of a community-based, intensive, culturally specific educational intervention for the primary prevention of lead burden. The study hypothesized that lead levels of children whose mothers received the intensive education will remain lower than those of children whose mothers receive basic education, and that mothers receiving the intervention will perform better on knowledge-based tests than will mothers who do not. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107491.

Keywords: American Indians, Asians-All others, Blacks, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infants, Lead Poisoning Prevention, Lead Poisoning Screening, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Parent Education, Parents, Peer Counseling, Preschool children, Research, Toddlers

Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning. [2001]. Track, monitor, and respond: Three keys to better lead screening for children in Medicaid. [Washington, DC]: Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on tracking, monitoring, and responding to lead screening efforts of managed care plans and health care providers. The primary audience is people in regional, state, and local Medicaid offices with responsibility for carrying out policy of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on lead screening and follow-up care for young Medicaid beneficiaries. The report is divided into three sections: the tracking section has recommendations on collecting essential information on lead screening; the monitoring section suggests strategies for utilizing this information; and the responding section is a case-study of a response to health care providers based on tracking and performance monitoring.

Contact: National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500 , Columbia, MD 21044, Telephone: (410) 992-0712 Secondary Telephone: (877) 312-3046 Fax: (443) 539-4150 E-mail: info@nchh.org Web Site: http://www.nchh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Lead poisoning screening, Medicaid, Models

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1998. Medicaid: Elevated blood lead levels in children. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on the degree to which harmful blood lead levels exist in Medicaid covered children, and the extent of blood level screening done on Medicaid covered children. This report covers only children aged 1–5. The analysis is based on information from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Appendices present information on the methodology and use of NHANES data, and statistical data on upper and lower limits for estimates.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-98-78.

Keywords: Child health, Lead poisoning, Medicaid, Screening

National Conference of State Legislatures, Health Care Program. 1997. Health care legislation 19__. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures, annual.

Annotation: This annual compilation summarizes laws and resolutions pertinent to maternal and child health issues passed by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Topics include: access, accidents/safety, coordination, data/quality, emergency medical services, environmental hazards, financing, immunization, injury prevention, insurance/managed care, legal/ethical issues, Medicaid, minority health, newborn screening, nutrition, oral health, pharmaceuticals, prenatal care/infant mortality, prevention and primary care, providers, school health, special health needs/diseases, substance abuse (maternal and infants), and women's health. Appendices list the states' bill numbers. This publication was previously called "Maternal and Child Health Legislation" and "Health Care Legislation: With a Special Focus on Maternal and Child Health and Primary Care."

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Contact Phone: (303) 830-2054 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Contact E-mail: www.books@ncsl.org Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org $25.00 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child abuse, Child care, Child care policy, Child health, Health education, Immunization, Injuries, Lead poisoning, Maternal health, Medicaid, Minority health, Neonatal screening, State legislation

Perez K, Wright B. 1995-1997. Health care legislation 1994/95: With a special focus on maternal and child health and primary care. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures, annual.

Annotation: This annual compilation summarizes laws and resolutions pertinent to maternal and child health issues passed by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Topics include: access, accidents/safety, coordination, data/quality, emergency medical services, environmental hazards, financing, immunization, injury prevention, insurance/managed care, legal/ethical issues, Medicaid, minority health, newborn screening, nutrition, oral health, pharmaceuticals, prenatal care/infant mortality, prevention and primary care, providers, school health, special health needs/diseases, substance abuse (maternal and infants), and women's health. Appendices list the states' bill numbers. This publication was previously called "Maternal and Child Health Legislation."

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Contact Phone: (303) 830-2054 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Contact E-mail: www.books@ncsl.org Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child abuse, Child care, Child care policy, Child health, Health education, Immunization, Injuries, Lead poisoning, Maternal health, Medicaid, Minority health, Neonatal screening, State legislation

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1993. Toxic substances: The extent of lead hazards in child care facilities and schools is unknown. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 21 pp.

Annotation: This investigation of lead in American child care facilities and schools was requested by the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment, Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives. There were two purposes of the survey: 1) inspect federal, state, and local programs and activities which address lead hazards in child care facilities and schools, and 2) access existing information on the extent and treatment of lead hazards in these facilities and schools. Three federal agencies that are primarily responsible for addressing lead hazards were examined. These agencies are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Child care licensing agencies, education agencies, and school districts in several states were also reviewed.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/RCED-93-197.

Keywords: Child care centers, Facility design and construction, Injury prevention, Lead poisoning, Schools, Screening, Statistics, Surveys

Pine BR, with Paulson JA, Solloway MR. 1992. Environmental risk factors and child health supervision: Childhood lead poisoning. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Center for Health Policy Research, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the literature on childhood lead poisoning and discusses various issues related to child health supervision. Included in the paper are a brief history of lead poisoning research, a review of the debate over causes and effects of childhood lead poisoning, a discussion of federal and state activities to prevent, manage and abate lead in the environment, and a discussion of the economic and policy implications of childhood lead poisoning. Selected legislation on environmental lead and child health (102nd Congress) is contained in an appendix. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: George Washington University, Center for Health Policy Research, 2021 K Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Contact Phone: (202) 530-2300 Fax: (202) 994-4040 E-mail: info@gwhealthpolicy.org Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/projects/center-health-policy-research Available at no charge.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Health supervision, Lead poisoning, Prevention, Screening

King MP. 1991-1995. Maternal and child health legislation. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures, annual.

Annotation: This annual compilation summarizes laws and resolutions pertinent to maternal and child health issues passed by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Topics include: access, accidents/safety, adolescent health, coordination, emergency medical services, financing, health education, immunization, injury prevention, insurance, lead poisoning, Medicaid, minority health, newborn screening, nutrition, oral health, prenatal care/infant mortality, prevention, providers, school health, special health care needs/diseases/chronic conditions, substance abuse (maternal and infants), treatment/services, and women's health. Appendices list the states' bill numbers, and provide a glossary and list of acronyms. Since 1992, the authorship has varied from year to year. In 1996 the name of this publication was changed to "Health Care Legislation 19__ with a Special Focus on Maternal and Child Health and Primary Care."

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Contact Phone: (303) 830-2054 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child abuse, Child care, Child care policy, Child health, Health education, Immunization, Injuries, Lead poisoning, Maternal health, Medicaid, Minority health, Neonatal screening, State legislation

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary. 1991. Healthy kids: Improving health care for infants and children. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, 14 items.

Annotation: This 14-piece public information kit describes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' programs designed to improve the health of infants and children. Information is included on the following topics: Head Start; school readiness; immunizations; adoption; infant mortality; child abuse and neglect; early health testing; tobacco; lead poisoning; injury prevention; disabled children; and, alcohol and other drug abuse. Contact persons and their phone numbers are also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Contact Phone: (202) 690-7047 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Out of print; contact organization for further information.

Keywords: Adoption, Alcohol, Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Children with special health care needs, Drug abuse, EPSDT, Head Start, Health screening, Immunization, Infant health, Infant mortality, Injury prevention, Lead poisoning, School readiness, Tobacco, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Paul NW, Golia SR, ed. 1989. Research in infant assessment: Proceedings of a symposium held by the Association for Children and Adults with Learning Disabilities (ACLD), Inc.. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, 169 pp. (Birth defects: Original article series; v. 25, no. 6)

Annotation: These proceedings of a symposium held by the Association for Children and Adults with learning Disabilities (ACLD) addressed the question: Is a risk index for learning disabilities in the cradle a valid concept? The symposium reviewed recent research indicating potential for predicting later learning disabilities through new assessment techniques performed with newborns. Topics included: 1) assessment of reproductive and caring variables; 2) minor physical anomalies; 3) electrical activity mapping; 4) auditory evoked responses from newborns; 5) prenatal exposure to teratogenic agents; 6) prenatal and neonatal exposure to lead; 7) acoustic cry analysis; 8) use of a risk index in infancy; 8) neurobehavioral assessment in newborns; and 9) metabolic correlates.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Drug induced congenital disorders, Lead poisoning, Learning disabilities, Neonatal screening, Nervous system diseases, Prenatal screening, Risk assessment, Teratogens

Guthrie R. 1986. New Methods to Screen for Lead Exposure [Final report]. Buffalo, NY: State University of New York at Buffalo,

Annotation: This project attempted to develop a sensitive and relatively inexpensive screening test for undue lead exposure which would facilitate the implementation of periodic screening and monitoring of preschool children for this important health problem. The project attempted to develop an assay using an already established uracil assay, with the modification that UPM would be added to agar medium. The project failed in its primary goal to develop a simple test on a dried blood spot specimen where an EP elevation had already been found. In the future, the researcher recommends that the same goal be pursued with a different approach. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB87-199071.

Keywords: Blood tests, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning screening, Preschool children

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, Bureau of State Services, Environmental Health Services Division. 1975. Increased lead absorption and lead poisoning in young children: A statement by the Center for Disease Control. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Environmental Health Services Division, 27 pp.

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Childhood lead poisoning: Prevention and management. City Health Information. 23(5):23-28. September 2004,

Annotation: This report discusses the problem of childhood lead poisoning in New York City and how it can be prevented. The report includes an overview of the problem; strategies for protecting children from lead poisoning; sources of lead exposure; interventions for lead-poisoned children; a lead poisoning prevention, screening, and management guide; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations on developmental monitoring and nutrition; and a risk assessment questionnaire. Additional information, including information resources for health professionals, is presented in colored boxes throughout the report.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Guidelines, Intervention, Lead, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning screening, Management, Nutrition, Prevention, Risk assessment

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.