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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Davidson GB. n.d.. Toward the control of lead poisoning in children: A cost/benefit analysis. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 46 pp. (Study series no.: 1-6 (9a))

Annotation: This paper evaluates the general worth of a specified lead poisoning control program confined to the Children and Youth Projects' child population only. The sensitivity of the cost/benefit model to the assumptions of the paper as well as to the input data considered is considered. The expected benefit of the proposed lead poisoning control program is compared to the expected cost. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Cost effectiveness, Federal MCH programs, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Title V programs

W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 2016. Managing lead in drinking water at schools and early childhood education facilities. Battle Creek, MI: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators and community leaders provides information about ways to limit children's exposure to lead in drinking water in schools and early childhood education facilities. Contents include information about the danger of lead in drinking water, how federal regulation has reduced exposure to lead in drinking water, deciding if a lead testing program is necessary, getting school buy-in for a program, involving external and community partners, preparing and taking lead samples, choosing remediation options, and communicating with the public. Recommendations are also included.

Contact: W. K. Kellogg Foundation, One Michigan Avenue, East, Battle Creek, MI 49017-4012, Telephone: (269) 968-1611 Fax: (269) 968-0413 Web Site: http://www.wkkf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Communication, Community action, Environmental exposure, Lead, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Lead poisoning screening, Regulations, School health programs, Schools, Testing, Water

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. 2012. Low level lead exposure harms children: A renewed call for primary prevention. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about new scientific knowledge, new technical developments, and their practical implications for childhood lead-poisoning-prevention efforts. The report consideres the usefulness of the "level of concern" as a result of accumulating scientific evidence of adverse effects of even low levels of lead exposure in children. In addition, the report considers laboratory capability for measuring blood lead levels in establishing new blood-lead-level guidance, provides advice on communicating to groups affected by policy changes, and makes recommendations for further research on lead-exposure-prevention and -intervention strategies.

Contact: National Center for Environmental Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta , GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communication, Intervention, Lead poisoning, Prevention programs, Public policy, Research

Pickett OK. 2012. Lead poisoning prevention: Resource brief. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Harvey B, ed. 2002. Managing elevated blood lead levels among young children: Recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 128 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward health departments, case managers, primary care physicians, and others, defines elements of case management and offers assessment and management guidelines for the testing and treatment of children with elevated blood lead levels. The report discusses home environment investigation and interventions, medical evaluation and treatment, nutritional assessment and dietary modification, developmental surveillance and interventions, and education for caregivers. The report also discusses the importance of state laws, regulations, and financing related to lead-abatement efforts. Each chapter begins with a summary table of specific management recommendations and concludes with suggestions for further research. A glossary, references, and statistical data in chart and table formats are provided throughout the report.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Blood testing, Case management, Consumer education, Dietary assessment, Environmental exposure, Intervention, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Low income groups, Medical evaluation, Model programs, Nutritional status, Professional training, Young children

Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning. [2001]. Track, monitor, and respond: Three keys to better lead screening for children in Medicaid. [Washington, DC]: Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on tracking, monitoring, and responding to lead screening efforts of managed care plans and health care providers. The primary audience is people in regional, state, and local Medicaid offices with responsibility for carrying out policy of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on lead screening and follow-up care for young Medicaid beneficiaries. The report is divided into three sections: the tracking section has recommendations on collecting essential information on lead screening; the monitoring section suggests strategies for utilizing this information; and the responding section is a case-study of a response to health care providers based on tracking and performance monitoring.

Contact: National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500 , Columbia, MD 21044, Telephone: (410) 992-0712 Secondary Telephone: (877) 312-3046 Fax: (443) 539-4150 E-mail: info@nchh.org Web Site: http://www.nchh.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Lead poisoning screening, Medicaid, Models

U.S. President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children. 2000. Eliminating childhood lead poisoning: A Federal strategy targeting lead paint hazards. Washington, DC: U.S. President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children, 46 pp., appendix (28 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents a coordinated federal program to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States. It describes the sources of lead poisoning; the costs and benefits of making homes lead safe; and federal agency roles on lead poisoning prevention. Budget summaries for FY 1999, 2000, and 2001 (proposed) are included.

Contact: U.S. Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh Street, S.W., Room P-3202, Washington, DC 20410, Telephone: (202) 708-1112 Secondary Telephone: (202) 402-0310 Fax: (202) 755-1000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hud.gov/lea Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Household safety, Housing, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Research methodology

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1999. Lead poisoning: Federal health care programs are not effectively reaching at-risk children. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 15 pp. (Hiscock Collection; related)

Annotation: This report is a review of federal activities for ensuring that at-risk children receive screening and treatment for lead poisoning; in particular it focuses on the risk for children served by federal health care programs. The report discusses: the continuing problem of elevated blood lead levels; lack of screening by federal programs; factors that affect screening rates; and problems that hinder follow-up treatment and other services. Conclusions, recommendations and agency comments and evaluation are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HEHS-99-18.

Keywords: EPSDT, Federal legislation, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs

Education Development Center, Lead Poisoning Prevention Project. 1996. Healthy beginnings: Lead safe families– an English as a second language curriculum on lead poisoning prevention. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, Lead Poisoning Prevention Project, 17 items.

Annotation: This set includes two educational guides and 15 practice conversations. The teacher's guide tells teachers of English as a second language how to integrate information about lead poisoning into their curriculum, and lists further reading and other resources in New England. The glossaries give useful words in English and another language for nine categories: going to the doctor, identifying symptoms of illness, making water safe to drink, preparing and storing food, avoiding dangers in the dirt, finding the right home, identifying household hazards, making your home safe, and renovating your home. The languages are: Chinese, Haitian-Creole, Khmer, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Other sections are six beginner's units and nine intermediate units of practice conversations, at the doctor's office, at the dinner table, and others.

Contact: Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 969-7100 Fax: (617) 969-5979 E-mail: comment@edc.org Web Site: http://www.edc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Educational materials, Lead poisoning prevention programs, Limited English speakers, Non English language materials, Spanish language materials

Wallin HK. 1996. Keeping our kids safe: Preventing injury in DC schools. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Graduate Public Policy Program; Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 2 v. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This report provides a brief introduction to issues addressed by a DC Family Policy Seminar in September 1996 which focused on injury prevention in the District of Columbia's public schools and was aimed at providing research information to help communities, schools, and families decrease the frequency of childhood injury on school property. Volume 1 (written by Helena Wallin) provides an introduction and background on some of the key components of childhood injury prevention, discusses four major injury areas in DC schools (lead poisoning, transportation/pedestrian, fire, and playground), presents policy options, and lists local and national organizations working in the injury prevention field. Volume 2 provides highlights of the seminar's discussions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Fire prevention, Injury prevention, Lead poisoning, Playground injuries, Prevention programs, Risk prevention, School safety

Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning. 1994. Building a lead-safe future: Second comprehensive national conference—Final report. Washington, DC: Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, 162 pp.

Janney AM, Langer G, Hochman M. 1984. Preliminary survey of lead poisoning prevention programs in ten regions: In depth review of activities in twenty selected states. Washington, DC: ICF Incorporated, ca. 60 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of a preliminary survey of lead poisoning prevention programs around the nation and reviews the efforts in twenty states. It reports general trends in states, provides regional summaries, reports state lead poisoning prevention programs, lead poisoning prevention programs in large cities, and other lead poisoning prevention programs. The report ends with a list of contacts.

Keywords: City health agencies, EPSDT, Lead poisoning prevention programs, State programs

Cherry FF, ed. 1981. Childhood lead poisoning prevention and control: A public health approach to an environmental disease. New Orleans, LA: Office of Health Services and Environmental Quality, Department of Health and Human Resources, Maternal and Child Health Section, 148 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the workshops of the Childhood Lead Toxicity conference held in New Orleans June 1-3, 1981. It covers the lead poisoning problem and service needs, steps in developing a childhood lead poisoning prevention program, prevention programs in St. Louis and South Carolina, and the need for a new approach.

Keywords: Lead poisoning, Prevention programs

Bacham GD, Swartz JM, Weckwerth VE. 1970. A report on lead poisoning in Children and Youth Projects. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 28 pp. (Study series no.: 0-10 (9))

Annotation: This paper analyses the lead poisoning problem within the Children and Youth Projects to provide information on the prevalence, detection, service practice, and costs of lead poisoning as well as to provide a basis for considering the appropriateness of a general program for lead eradication. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title II. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Lead poisoning, Lead poisoning prevention programs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.