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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 19 (19 total).

Healthy Schools Network. 2015. Environmental health at school: Ignored too long. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 54 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a national facilitated workshop held on November 9–11, 2015, in Washington, DC, to develop research and policy recommendations for addressing environmental health hazards commonly found in the nation's PK–12 schools and child care facilities. Contents include the problem statement, identifying environmental health exposures in or near schools and child care facilities, and the needs and perspectives of state and county health departments. Topics include expanding or enhancing federal and state standards and guidelines and enforcement of environmental health in schools and child care facilities; developing prevention, intervention, and tracking programs; and developing training, education, and guidance for parents and guardians and for health care and public health professionals.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Collaboration, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Hazardous materials, Injury prevention, Law enforcement, Policy development, Preschool children, Research, Risk factors, Safety, School age children, Schools

Hillsborough County [Community] Violence Prevention Collaborative. 2014. 2014-2015 strategic plan. [Tampa, FL]: Hillsborough County, 68 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a public health approach to preventing violence in Hillsborough County, FL. Topics include national best practices and lessons learned for preventing violence, efforts to identify and prioritize risk and protective factors for decreasing community violence and increasing a sense of safety among youth in Hillsborough County, and successful intervention and enforcement strategies.

Contact: Hillsborough County, Community Violence Prevention Collaborative, County Center, 26th Floor, 601 E. Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, FL Telephone: (813) 274-6789 E-mail: vpc@hillsboroughcounty.org Web Site: http://www.hillsboroughcounty.org/index.aspx?NID=3222 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, County programs, Florida, Injury prevention, Law enforcement, Local initiatives, Protective factors, Public health, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, Safety programs, Strategic plans, Violence prevention

New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, Creative Media Institute. (2013). Ensuring child safety: A three-part video series for law enforcement personnel. Las Cruces, NM: New Mexico State University, Southwest Institute for Family and Child Advocacy, 3 videos.

Annotation: These three videorecordings, about 15-20 minutes each, help train law enforcement officers in New Mexico about child safety in traumatic situations involving abuse or neglect of children, and provides tips and procedures in minimizing trauma for children. Video topics include: (1) parental arrest, (2) abuse and neglect referrals, and (3) minimizing trauma.

Contact: Southwest Region-National Child Protection Training Center, New Mexico State University, PO Box 30003, MSC3470, Las Cruces, NM 88003, E-mail: sbucher@nmsu.edu Web Site: http://swrtc.nmsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child safety, Child welfare, Children, Law enforcement, New Mexico, Professional training, Trauma

Simon TR, Ritter NM, Mahendra RR, eds. 2013. Changing course: Preventing gang membership. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Control and Prevention; Washington, DC:National Institute of Justice, 167 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on preventing children and adolescents from joining gangs, comprises chapters written by a variety of criminal justice and public health researchers. Topics include consequences of gang membership; why prevention is important; the scope of the problem; why children and adolescents join gangs; the nexus of public safety and public health; the roles of public health, law enforcement, child development, families, schools, communities, race, and ethnicity; preventing girls from joining gangs; and the importance of evaluation.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Ethnic factors, Families, Gangs, Law enforcement, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public health, Racial factors, Safety, Schools, Violence prevention

Colman S, Joyce TJ. 2010. Regulating abortion: Impact on patients and providers in Texas. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 32 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 15825)

Annotation: This report examines how the enforcement of the Woman’s Right to Know Act (WRTK) beginning on January 1, 2004, in the state of Texas, had an impact on abortions performed in that state. It analyzes how the law, which requires that all abortions at 16 weeks gestation or later be performed in an ambulatory surgical center, affected (1) the incidence and timing of abortions, (2) the type of facility in which abortions are performed, and (3) the number of abortions obtained out of state by residents of Texas. The report also examines whether the mandated information and waiting-period component of the law was associated with changes in abortion rates prior to 16 weeks gestation.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Data analysis, Gestational age, Law enforcement, Outcome evaluation, State legislation, Statistics, Texas

Child Welfare Information Gateay. 2010. Infant safe haven laws: Summary of state laws. [Washington, DC]: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes infant safe haven laws intended to provide incentive for mothers in crisis to safely relinquish their babies to designated locations where they will be protected and provided with medical care until a permanent home can be found. The report compares the infant safe haven legislation in the U.S. states and territories that have enacted such laws, describing who may legally leave an infant at a safe haven; who is considered to be a "safe haven provider;" and what the responsibilities of the providers are. The report also describes the immunity from liability that the providers receive as well as the protections from criminal liability (and the consequences of relinquishment) that parents receive under the safe haven laws.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Infant health, Law enforcement, Safety programs, State legislation

Sampson R. 2009. Bullying in schools. Washington, DC: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, 48 pp. (Problem-oriented guides for police, problem-specific guides series, no. 12)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes knowledge gained from past studies in the U.S. and other western countries about the extent and nature of the problem of bullying in schools, methods for analyzing local problems, and how police can reduce school bullying and the harm caused by it. Appendices contain a summary of responses or interventions to reduce school bullying and a sample brochure that educates parents about school bullying.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530, Telephone: (800) 421-6770 E-mail: askCopsRC@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.cops.usdoj.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932582-11-8.

Keywords: Bullying, Law enforcement, School linked programs, School safety, School violence

National Institute of Justice. 2004. Evaluating G.R.E.A.T.: A school-based gang prevention program. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, 4 pp. (Research for policy)

Annotation: This report summarizes results of a 5-year study of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program, a 9-hour gang prevention program administered by uniformed law enforcement officers to middle school students.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NCJ 198604.

Keywords: Community programs, Gangs, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Law enforcement, Middle schools, Program evaluation, Students

Presman D, Chapman R, Rosen L. 2002. Creative partnerships: Supporting youth, building communities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 14 pp. (Cops innovations: A closer look)

Annotation: This report describes three innovative examples of ways the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services has worked with local agencies to develop partnership-based programs for youth. Programs described include (1) Home Run Program, with probation officers working with students in schools to identify and address behavioral problems to prevent entrance into the juvenile justice system in the future; (2) Stop the Violence, empowering youth to find ways to address school violence; and (23 police magnet schools, encouraging students to view law enforcement as a rewarding career path.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530, Telephone: (800) 421-6770 E-mail: askCopsRC@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.cops.usdoj.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Agencies, Community organizations, Community programs, Government, Interagency cooperation, Law enforcement, Schools

Schmittroth L, ed. 1995. Statistical record of women worldwide. (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1047 pp.

Annotation: This statistical summary presents data that reflect the condition of women, their lives, and their opportunities throughout the world. The preface describes the intent, methodology, and organization of the volume, and provides information on its use. It includes published and non-published data from governmental and non-governmental sources. The individual tables provide source information; a complete list of sources consulted is also included, and detailed indexes are provided. The range of topics covered are: attitudes and opinions; business and economics; crime, law enforcement, and legal justice; domestic life; education; health and medical care; income, spending, and wealth; labor, employment, and occupations; the military; population and vital statistics; public life; religion; sexuality; and sports and recreation.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8103-8872-3.

Keywords: Attitudes, Business, Careers, Costs, Crime, Criminal justice system, Data, Demographics, Economic factors, Education, Employment, Family economics, Family income, Family life, Government, Health, Health services, International data, Labor, Law enforcement, Military, Political systems, Religion, Sex role, Sexuality, Sports, Vital statistics, Women, Women's rights

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service. 1994. Community policing resource package. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Justice, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, 24 items.

Annotation: This information package contains monographs, journal articles, and newsletters that focus on community policing. The individual items were previously prepared or published by the National Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, or the National Crime Prevention Council between 1988 and 1994. The materials include pieces that give an overview of community policing, describe the implementation of such programs in various cities and rural communities, consider the effect on the community, and review the overall impact on the criminal justice system. An annotated bibliography listing other readings is also included.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov $32.00 includes shipping and handling; prepayment required. Document Number: NCJ 147702.

Keywords: Criminal justice system, Law enforcement, Outreach, Personnel

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Child Fatality Review Advisory Workgroup. 1993. Recommendations of the Child Fatality Review Advisory Work Group. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report suggests various steps which can be taken to improve the review of children's deaths, to better detect those which are the result of neglect or abuse. Convened by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the work group makes recommendations for national, state, and local systems, outlining the essential elements of a coordinated review of child fatalities, and touching on issues of training and education, confidentiality, cultural sensitivity, data collection and reporting, and financing of such efforts. The members of the work group are named in the report.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHG045.

Keywords: Child mortality, Investigations, Law enforcement, Legal issues, Policy development

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 1993. Joint investigations of child abuse: Report of a symposium. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, 29 pp.

Annotation: This booklet reports on a symposium which looked at the issue of interagency cooperation and joint investigations in suspected cases of child abuse. Symposium participants discussed current practice in various jurisdictions, the components of a coordinated system, barriers to cooperation, and solutions already available to improve cooperation. The report closes with recommendations for future action. The symposium agenda, the list of participants, and lists of states with laws mandating or encouraging interagency cooperation are appended.

Contact: National Institute of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-2942 Fax: (202) 307-6394 Web Site: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Interagency cooperation, Investigations, Law enforcement

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 1992. Children's justice act grant program: A report to Congress on state programs for the investigation and prosecution of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, 139 pp.

Annotation: This report provides of an overview of the state-based programs funded by the Children's Justice Act Grants. These programs were designed to improve approaches to the investigation and prosecution of child abuse cases, particularly those in which sexual abuse is a factor. Key program accomplishments and initiatives as well as a summary of findings and conclusions are presented. Examples of areas highlighted in the report where improvement was shown include training, establishment of child advocacy centers, development of multidisciplinary teams, legal process simplification, and research and evaluation. The report also includes initiatives that have addressed sentencing laws as well as indirect testimony admission procedures. The report explores the various methods states have used to meet eligibility requirements, as well as methods to implement the goals of the Children's Justice Act. The appendices include a copy of the legislation authorizing the Children's Act Grant Program, program instructions, recipients of grant monies in FY 1988, and a sample report from one of the state multidisciplinary task forces.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (703) 821-2086 E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: 20-10021.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Criminal justice system, Federal grants, Investigations, Law enforcement, State programs, Statistics

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 1989. Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving: Background papers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 260 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: The background papers in this volume were commissioned to provide a foundation for and launch the discussion of the expert panels of the workshop. The authors presented state of the art in the different fields and describe the various attempts throughout the country and world to prevent alcohol-impaired driving. The topics were alcohol beverage control policies, mass communication effects on drinking and driving, epidemiologic perspectives on drunk driving, controlling injuries due to drinking and driving, the effectiveness of legal sanctions in dealing with drinking drivers, issues in the enforcement of impaired driving laws, transportation and alcohol service policies, injury control, youth impaired driving, problems among Native Americans and Alaska Natives, drunk driving among blacks and Hispanics, treatment, and citizen advocacy.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Advocacy, Advocacy, Alaska natives, American Indians, Blacks, Business, Consumer education, Criminal justice system, Data, Epidemiology, Hispanic Americans, Impaired driving, Industry, Injury prevention, Intervention, Law enforcement, Legislation, Mass media, Media campaigns, Motor vehicles, Outreach, Policies, Political systems, Prevention, Rehabilitation

Bross DC, Krugman RD, Lenherr MR, Rosenberg DA, Schmitt BD, eds. 1988. The new child protection team handbook. New York, NY: Garland Publishing Company, 636 pp. (Garland reference library of social science; v. 380)

Annotation: This manual serves as a guide for those professionals working on a multidisciplinary case management team for child abuse and neglect victims. Sections focus on case management team development and organization, diagnostic and assessment duties of team members, involvement with the legal system, specialized case management teams, and current trends in case management.

Contact: Garland Science, Taylor and Francis Group, 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxford, United Kingdom OX14 4RN, Telephone: +44 (0) 7017 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 7017 6699 Web Site: http://www.taylorandfrancis.co.uk Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-8240-8519-1.

Keywords: Case management, Child abuse, Child protective services, Children, Criminal justice system, Injury prevention, Interagency cooperation, Interdisciplinary approach, Investigations, Law enforcement, Manuals, Multidisciplinary teams, Service coordination, Social services

National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations . 1986. Hispanic young adolescents: Developing after school programs and parent training—A resource manual. Washington, DC: National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, 40 pp.

Schechter S. 1982. Women and male violence: The visions and struggles of the battered women's movement. Boston, MA: South End Press, 300 pp.

Aspen Systems Corporation. 1972?-. National criminal justice thesaurus: Descriptors for indexing law enforcement and criminal justice information. [Washington, DC?]: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, irregular.

Annotation: This thesaurus was developed to index literature being added to the National Criminal Justice Reference Service's document database. The inclusion of terms is based on the vocabulary used in the documents added to the database, on the frequency of usage for the term, and on the language of the user community. The terms includes scope notes when necessary for clarification; used for notations; and links to broader, narrower, and related terms. The thesaurus is presented in four sections: substantive terms, organizational entries, geographic terms, and a permuted index.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NCJ -145859.

Keywords: Criminal justice system, Law enforcement, Thesauri

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.