Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (81 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics and Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice. n.d.. AAP Child Health Mapping Project. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides a geographic representation of child health in the United States. Contents include national and state-specific data on pediatric health care delivery at the Primary Care Service Area level. A range of maps is available including the number of children under age 18 per pediatrician, the number of children in linguistically-isolated households, median household income, the number of pediatric residents and fellows, and estimated vaccine coverage rates. An interactive mapping tool is available to members of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Data sources, Geographic regions, Health care disparities, Immunization, Integrated information systems, Interactive media, Language barriers, Low income groups, Patient care planning, Pediatricians, Statewide planning, Work force

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development. 2017. Resource guide: Building a bright future for all–Success in early learning programs and elementary school for immigrant families. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, 55 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist state and local efforts to support immigrant children from birth through the elementary grades and promote educational equity and opportunity for all children. Contents include a glossary and background; legal guidelines; tips for early learning programs, elementary schools, and educators; and information about education and supportive service programs and resources. The second section of the guide is a handbook for parents on topics such as why quality early learning matters, tips on immunizations, information about civil rights and program eligibility, tips for addressing barriers, and opportunities for parents and guardians.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Washington, DC Telephone: (202) 401-0831 Secondary Telephone: (202) 401-7888 E-mail: opepd.ppss@ed.gov Web Site: https://ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Civil rights, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Elementary schools, Eligibility, Equal opportunities, Guardianship, Immigrants, Learning, Legal issues, Parents, Spanish language materials

Public Counsel. 2017. Assuring equitable funding of services for children with developmental disabilities. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes purchase of services authorization data for race, ethnic, and language group disparities for infants, children, and youth from birth to age 21 in California; discusses possible root causes; and makes recommendations for addressing the disparities. Contents include background, 25 years of research studies on service disparities, data reporting requirements and compliance, study methodology and approach, a summary of findings, detailed results, recommendations, conclusion, and next steps.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescents, Barriers, California, Children, Developmental disabilities, Ethnic factors, Financing, Geographic factors, Infants, Language, Legal issues, Policy analysis, State legislation

Wilson K, Dworetzky B, Comeau M. 2016. Health care coverage and financing for children with special health care needs: A tutorial to address inequities. Boston, MA: Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 51 pp.

Annotation: These modules are designed to help maternal and child leaders, family leaders, and other stakeholders understand and address health care coverage inequities that exist among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) based on race, ethnicity, income, immigration status, language, and level of functional difficulty. Contents include 6 modules on topics such as the language used to describe differences and tools and examples of policies, programs, and partnerships to improve access to coverage and financing of care for CSHCN. A worksheet is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Data analysis, Equal opportunities, Financing, Health insurance, Language barriers, Policy development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Special health care needs, Young adults, Youth

Park M, McHugh M. 2014. Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies the unique needs of immigrant parents across the range of expectations for parent skill, engagement, and leadership sought by early childhood education and care programs, as well as strategies for addressing these needs. Contents include selected demographics of children of immigrants and their parents, factors jeopardizing meaningful engagement, the importance of parent engagement specific to children of immigrants, federal programming, family literacy and dual-generation strategies, and adult education. Research findings and recommendations are also presented.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult education, Child care, Early childhood education, Federal programs, Immigrants, Intergenerational programs, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Literacy education, Low literacy, Parent professional relations, Parent support services, Parents, Research, Young children

Anat Shenker Osorio Communications, Center for Community Change, Lake Research Partners. 2014. Messaging for economic justice. Washington, DC: Center for Community Change, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings of research about delivering effective messages aimed at dismantling the barriers that create and sustain poverty. It lists key principles of effective messaging, words to avoid and to embrace, and examples of messages with varying types of speakers. It briefly summarizes research tasks, including language analysis; listening sessions with African Americans, Latinos, and whites at or below the poverty level; advocate interviews; and a phone survey to test messages to engage the base, persuade the middle, and alienate the opposition.

Contact: Center for Community Change, 1536 U Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 339-9300 Web Site: http://www.communitychange.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Language barriers, Low income groups, Nonprejudicial language, Poverty, Research

Hughes D. 2014. A review of the literature pertaining to family-centered care for children with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a review of selected research related to family-centered care (FCC) for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Contents include highlights from studies that examine the following components of FCC: family-provider partnerships, coordinated care, racial/ethnic and linguistic barriers, and culturally competent care. It also examines access, unmet need and satisfaction for CSHCN and outcomes of FCC and medical homes.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Families, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Special health care needs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2013. Language access plan. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 26 pp.

Annotation: This plan establishes a strategy for ensuring meaningful access by individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) to programs and activities administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in in accordance with Executive Order 13166, Improving Access to Services For Persons With Limited English Proficiency, issued in August 2000. The plan includes a definition of the HHS language access policy based on the following essential elements: assessment of needs and capacity, oral language assistance services, written translations, policies and procedures, notification of the availability of language assistance at no cost, staff training, assessment of access and quality, stakeholder consultation, digital information, and grant assurance and compliance. Each of these ten elements are defined, and actions steps for implementation are provided.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Guidelines, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Public policy, Strategic plans

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2013. National standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in health and health care: A blueprint for advancing and sustaining policy and practice. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 191 pp.

Annotation: This document is a guide for implementing and maintaining culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) within health and health care organizations. Contents include information on why CLAS services are necessary; the purpose, audience, components, and strategies for implementing national CLAS standards; and enhancements made to the original CLAS standards. The document also contains a blueprint for providing information on the standards. The blueprint organizes the standards under the following general topics: governance, leadership, and workforce; communication and language assistance; and engagement, continuous improvement, and accountability. Resources for additional information and guidance are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Culturally competent services, Federal initiatives, Language, Public policy, Standards

Bouressa D. 2013. Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program (Bilingual Nurse Advocate): Final report and abstract. Nashville, TN: Saint Thomas Health Services Fund, Baptist Hospital, 3 files.

Annotation: This report describes the 2008-2013 project to address Spanish language and culture barriers between Spanish-speaking women and their obstetric health care providers at Baptist Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee, through the development of a Bilingual Nurse Advocate (BNA) program. Contents include goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, publications and products produced, dissemination and utilization of results, as well as future plans and sustainability. Appendices include Spanish language samples of publications developed during the program [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Final reports, Language barriers, Nurses, Obstetrical nursing, Patient advocacy, Pregnant women, Spanish language materials

Goode T, Bronheim S. 2013. Experiential learning: Cultural and linguistic competence checklist for MCH training programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 9 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is designed to facilitate the integration of cultural and linguistic competence in experiential learning opportunities offered by maternal and child health training programs. Topics include choosing and monitoring experiential learning settings; preparing trainees to address stereotyping, bias, and discrimination in experiential learning settings; and supporting students in experiential learning settings. Definitions and key concepts are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Competency based education, Cultural competence, Language barriers, MCH training, Professional education

Baruch E, Walker SF, ed. 2013. Health equity and language access. Denver, CO: Colorado Trust, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper looks at how language-access issues affect patients, policymakers, and health professionals in Colorado. The paper examines the importance of language access in health care, provides policymakers with an overview of existing legal requirements and additional policy opportunities for consideration, and offers health professionals approaches to improving language access. The Affordable Care Act and Medicaid are discussed as they related to language-access issues. Case studies showing how some Colorado organizations have made strides in improving language access are included.

Contact: Colorado Trust, 1600 Sherman Street, Denver, CO 80203-1604, Telephone: (303) 837-1200 Secondary Telephone: (888) 847-9140 Fax: (303) 839-9034 E-mail: questions@coloradotrust.org Web Site: http://www.coloradotrust.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Case studies, Colorado, Health care reform, Language barriers, Legislation, Medicaid, Program, Public policy, State initiatives

Cooper LA, Pesquera M. 2013. Maryland cultural, linguistic and health literacy competency strategies: A policy framework for 2013–2020. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Health Quality and Cost Council, 80 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings and recommendations for increasing the cultural, linguistic, and health literacy competency of health professionals and health care delivery organizations throughout Maryland. Contents include recommendations for cultural competency standards and tiered reimbursement for medical and behavioral service settings, standards for multicultural health in patient-centered medical homes and other health care settings, and standards for continuing education in cultural competency for health care professionals.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health, 201 West Preston Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-6500 Secondary Telephone: (877) 463-3464 Web Site: http://www.dhmh.maryland.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Continuing education, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Equal opportunities, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health literacy, Language barriers, Maryland, Medical home, Reimbursement, Standards, Work force

Stredler Brown A, Kahn G, Houston T, DeMoss W, Quigley S, Hamren K, Peters Lalios A, Kravit D, Olsen S, Blaiser K, Edwards M, Behl D, White K, Callow-Heusser C, Ladner D. 2012-. A practical guide to the use of tele-intervention in providing listening and spoken language services to infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing. Logan, UT: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to programs and individuals interested in using tele-intervention (TI) to provide family-centered early intervention to families of children who are deaf/hard of hearing who have chosen a spoken language outcome. Topics include benefits and challenges, implementation of TI sessions, technology to support TI, privacy and security considerations, licensing issues, evaluating TI outcomes, and reimbursement issues for TI. Video examples and a list of related publications and resources are included.

Contact: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah Sate University, 2615 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Deafness, Early intervention, Hearing disorders, Infants, Language barriers, Language development, Language therapy, Service delivery, Telecommunication devices, Telemedicine

ViaLanguage. 2012. Beyond translation: Best practices for healthcare [3rd. ed.]. Portland, OR: ViaLanguage, 44 pp.

Annotation: This booklet about the translation of health information is geared toward helping health professionals reach their Limited English Proficiency (LEP) audiences with messages and information in the most effective way. It addresses these practices: (1) defining objectives and scope of the translation program; (2) balancing language needs and cultural differences; (3) use of the Internet, social media, and mobile applications; (4) delivering successful translation/transcreation and localization projects; (5) finding a good translation service; and (6) budgeting. The booklet also provides a list of major legislation that mandates access services for those with limited English proficiency; tips on maintaining a project timeline; and a description of translation tools such as translation memory software, translation glossaries, and style guides.

Contact: ViaLanguage, 700 SouthWest Taylor Street, Suite 300, Portland, OR 97205, Telephone: (800) 737-8481 Web Site: http://www.viadelivers.com/via_solutions_learning.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Culturally competent services, Health services, Language barriers, Non English language materials, Translations

McPheeters ML, Kripalani S, Peterson, NB, Idowu RT, Jerome RN, Potter SA, Andrews JC. 2012. Quality improvement interventions to address health disparities: Closing the quality gap—Revisiting the state of the science. U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 475 pp., exec. summ. (15 pp.). (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 208)

Annotation: This literature review (from 1983-2011) evaluates the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) strategies in reducing disparities in health and health care. The review focused on 12 clinical conditions and assessed health disparities associated with race or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, insurance status, sexual orientation, health literacy/numeracy, and language barrier. Contents are divided into the following sections: background on QI and health disparities approaches, scope and key questions of focus for the review, methods used, a results overview, and discussion of main findings. References, tables, and appendices are also inlcuded.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pu.b No. 12-E009-EF.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Health care disparities, Health insurance, Health literacy, Health status disparities, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Minority health, Racial factors, Sexual identity, Socioeconomic status

DeFrancis B, Richards J. 2012. Translation toolkit. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist maternal and child health professionals in addressing language barriers. Contents include best practices and standards, resources about plain language and health literacy, glossaries and medical dictionaries, non English language materials, and information about translation services and resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Language barriers, Model programs, Non English language materials, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Translations

National Center for Cultural Competence and National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Resource Center. 2011. Cultural and linguistic competence self-assessment for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 2 parts.

Annotation: This webinar discusses the concepts of cultural and linguistic competence as they apply to the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) process and reviews the benefits, principles, and potential approaches to cultural and linguistic competence self-assessments that are appropriate for FIMR programs. The webinar also discusses the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Organizational Assessment Instrument for FIMR programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Assessment, Fetal mortality, Infant death review committees, Language barriers, Multimedia, Programs

Mather M, Foxen P. 2010. America's future: Latino child well-being in numbers and trends. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza, 29 pp.

Annotation: This data book offers a comprehensive overview of the state of Latino children and adolescents under age 18 in the United States by integrating a range of key factors and outcomes in the areas of demography, citizenship, family structure, poverty, health, education, and juvenile justice. The data book provides an overview of current national and state-level trends from Latino children and adolescents relative to non-Hispanic white and black children and adolescents, documenting both regional variations and changing trends since the year 2000. Topics include population trends and geographic distribution, nativity status and citizenship, family structure and income, education and language, health, and juvenile justice.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Children, Education, Families, Health, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Juvenile justice, Language, Language barriers, Medical home, Obesity, Poverty, Statistical data, Trends, Uninsured persons

Boylan E, Splansky D. 2010. Access to pre-K education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Newark, NJ: Education Law Center, 16 pp. (Pre-K policy brief series)

Annotation: This policy brief provides an overview of the federal law requiring states to ensure that homeless children have equal access to the same free, appropriate, public education, including a public preschool education, as provided to other children. The brief also discusses the law's limitations and barriers to pre-kindergarten (pre-k) attendance and describes policies that can help increase the number of homeless children included in pre-k programs. The brief is intended to serve as a resource for state policymakers and advocates seeking to maximize participation in pre-k programs.

Contact: Education Law Center, 60 Park Place, Suite 300, Newark, NJ 07102, Telephone: (973) 624-1815 Secondary Telephone: (973) 624-4618 Fax: (973) 624-7339 E-mail: elc@edlawcenter.org Web Site: http://www.edlawcenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Legislation, Advocacy, Children, Cultural barriers, Early childhood education, Financial barriers, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Language barriers, Low income groups, Poverty, Preschool children, Public policy, Young children

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.