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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (140 total).

Hitti JE, Melvin AJ, Taylor P, Rhodes W, eds. 2016. Screening and management of maternal HIV infection: Implications for mother and infant (rev. ed.). Seattle, WA: University of Washington, Northwest Regional Perinatal Program and Department of Pediatrics; Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, 40 pp.

Annotation: This handbook describes best practices to help with the continuing effort to prevent HIV infection in women and infants. Topics include HIV counseling and testing during pregnancy; perinatal transmission risk; diagnostic tests; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's classification of disease; HIV reporting requirements; medications and treatment during pregnancy, labor, delivery and postpartum; newborn treatment; and consultation and referral information. Four appendices provide a resource directory, a listing of local health jurisdictions in Washington state, free regional and national telephone consultation resources, and Web sites. References conclude the handbook.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Consultation, Counseling, Diagnostic tests, HIV, HIV screening, Labor, Medicine, Newborns, Perinatal care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Referral, Resource materials, Women's health

Littrell J. 2015. Human trafficking in America's schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 13 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist school officials in understanding how human trafficking impacts schools; recognizing the indicators of possible child trafficking; and developing policies, protocols, and partnerships to address and prevent the exploitation of children. Topics include child sex trafficking, child labor trafficking, deconstructing perceptions and a victim-centered approach, risk factors and predictors, what to do about suspected trafficking, recruitment, impact on learning environment, and community involvement. The guide contains a sample protocol for school districts and describes U.S. government entities combating human trafficking, publications and resources, training, services, and terms and definitions.

Contact: National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-5000 Fax: (202) 403-5001 Web Site: http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, Child sexual abuse, Community action, Learning, Policy development, Protective factors, Protocols, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Training

Association of Public Health Laboratories. 2014-. Newborn screening and genetics. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information on the role of public health laboratories in genetics testing and newborn screening science and practice. Resources for education, technical assistance and evaluation, training, and quality improvement are also included.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Infants, Laboratories, Laboratory techniques, Neonatal screening, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Technical assistance, Training

Beachy SH, Johnson SG, Olson S, Berger AC, rapporteurs; Institute of Medicine, Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health. 2014. Refining processes for the co-development of genome-based therapeutics and companion diagnostic tests: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 102 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a workshop held on February 27, 2013, in Washington, DC, to examine and discuss challenges and potential solutions for the co-development of targeted therapeutics and companion molecular tests for the prediction of drug response. Topics include perspectives from a variety of stakeholders including patients, providers, and laboratory representatives; pharmaceutical developers; and payers and regulators.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-29821-6.

Keywords: Financing, Genomics, Laboratory techniques, Pharmaceutical research, Regulations, Testing, Therapeutics

Santoro KL. 2014. Born too early: Improving maternal and child health by reducing early elective deliveries. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 10 pp. (NIHCM Foundation issue brief)

Annotation: This brief discusses the health risks and costs associated with early elective deliveries (EED),federal and national initiatives to support full-term pregnancies, and health plan and health plan foundation approaches to reducing EED. Topics include the potential negative health consequences of EED; average payments for maternal and newborn care and payment reform; and hospital, provider, patient, and member education initiatives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Cesarean section, Childbirth, Costs, Federal initiatives, Foundations, Health education, Health plans, Induced labor, Intervention, National initiatives, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Reimbursement

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. State levers for change. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Multiple items.

Annotation: This resource for state leaders provides tools and examples from states working to address early elective deliveries. Topics include policy/leadership, increasing capacity/systems of care, partnerships and collaborations/community engagement, messaging, and data.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Cesarean section, Childbirth, Federal initiatives, Health education, Induced labor, Intervention, Pregnant women, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, State initiatives

National Quality Forum. 2014. Playbook for the successful elimination of early elective deliveries. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on and strategies for reducing rates of early elective delivery (EED). Topics include the current landscape for eliminating EED, barriers to reducing EED and strategies to overcome them, challenges and barriers to monitoring performance and progress toward eliminating EED, key strategies to promote readiness for EED activities, and measurement guidance. Additional contents include educational tools, resources, and exemplars to support EED elimination efforts, as well as instructions for accessing relevant data.

Contact: National Quality Forum, 1030 15th Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 783-1300 Fax: (202) 783-3434 E-mail: info@qualityforum.org Web Site: http://www.qualityforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Cesarean section, Childbirth, Hospitals, Induced labor, Measures, Obstetrical care, Policy development, Program improvement, Quality assurance

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. Early elective delivery. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 7 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief defines early elective delivery (EED) as a public health concern and describes the role of state health agencies in reducing EEDs. Topics include rates of labor induction, cesarean section, and EEDs; policy options and national initiatives; data collection and reporting; and examples from states.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Childbirth, Data collection, Government role, Induced labor, National initiatives, Policy development, State agencies

National Child and Maternal Health Education Program. 2013. Initiative to Reduce Elective Deliveries Before 39 weeks of Pregnancy: Is it worth it?. [Rockville, MD]: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1 video (4 min., 10 sec.).

Annotation: This video for consumers explains why it's important to mother and baby's health to wait at least 39 weeks of pregnancy to deliver if the mother or child's health is not in danger. The video is available in a full-length version (4 min.,10 seconds), as well as 60-and 30-second versions. The initiative web page provides additional information for moms to be and for health professionals, including tools to help spread the word such as an infographic, ecards, and badges to put on a personal web site, blog, or organizational web site.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Gestational age, Induced labor, National initiatives, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Risk factors

Radice SD. 2013. Fluoride and water testing laboratories. [Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health], 3 pp.

Annotation: This document defines fluoride, describes the benefits of fluoridated water, and discusses the importance of consulting a health professional or oral health professional before making decisions about taking fluoride supplements. The document also provides information about independent laboratories that the Maryland Department of the Environment has approved to test fluoride levels and accept water samples from the general public.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Oral Health, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) 735-2258 Fax: (410) 333-7392 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/oralhealth/Pages/home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluorides, Laboratories, Maryland, Oral health, State programs, Testing, Water

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. [2011]. 40 reasons to go the full 40: Nobody likes to be rushed—especially babies!. Washington, DC: Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains why it is important to carry a baby to full term (40 weeks) and reminds pregnant women that labor should be induced for medical reasons only -- not for convenience. The fact sheet lists 40 different reasons to carry a baby to full term, including the health benefits to both the mother and baby, the reduction in health risks, and the ways in which expectant parents can enjoy the time before the birth of their baby.

Contact: Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 740, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 261-2400 Secondary Telephone: (800) 673-8499 Fax: (202) 728-0575 E-mail: customerservice@awhonn.org Web Site: http://www.awhonn.org/awhonn/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Induced labor, Infant health, Perinatal care, Pregnancy outcome

Childbirth Connection. 2011. Induction of labor: What you need to know about induction of labor. [New York, NY]: Childbirth Connection, 4 pp.

Annotation: This electronic resource for pregnant women provides information about induction of labor, including answers to the following questions: (1) How can I lower my chances of being induced unnecessarily; (2) What normally causes labor to begin? (3) What is the safest point in pregnancy for the baby to be born? and (4) Why are so many women experiencing induced labor? The resource also describes reasons why caregivers might recommend induction of labor; provides best evidence related to the induction of labor (including common "reasons" for induction that are not supported by rigorous research); and tips and tools to help pregnant women reduce their risk of being induced or having the best possible outcome if induction is called for. A quick fact sheet about the induction of labor and the results of the Childbirth Connection's Listening to Mothers survey of women who gave birth in hospitals in 2005 can be downloaded from the website.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Induced labor, Pregnant women, Risk factors

Childbirth Connection. 2011. Quick facts about induction of labor. [New York, NY]: Childbirth Connection, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for pregnant women provides answers to the following questions about induced labor: (1) What is the safest point in pregnancy for the baby to be born? (2) How may induction of labor affect my health, my baby's health, or my birth experience? (3) When is it beneficial to induce labor? (4) What common "reasons" for induction are not supported by rigorous research? (5) How can I lower my chances of being induced unnecessarily? and (6) Where can I learn more? The information is adapted from the Childbirth Connection's web-based resource on induction of labor.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, Childbirth Connection Programs, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, E-mail: info@childbirthconnection.org Web Site: http://www.childbirthconnection.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Induced labor, Pregnant women, Risk factors

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2011. Vaginal birth after cesarean delivery: Deciding on a trial of labor after cesarean delivery. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 2 pp. (FAQ)

Annotation: This patient education brochure describes the choices women have when planning how to give birth after a previous cesarean delivery. It describes the reasons why women might consider a trial of labor after a cesarean delivery (called TOLAC) and, if successful, a vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC). The brochure explains the reasons why women may want to think about TOLAC, the potential risks involved, and the factors that have been shown to increase or decrease the chances of successful TOLAC and VBAC. Included are illustrations of the various types of cesarean incisions and a glossary of terms. The brochure is also available in Spanish.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Labor, Pregnant women, Risk factors, Spanish language materials, Vaginal birth after cesarean

California HealthCare Foundation. 2011. Elective childbirth procedures in California: A close-up of geographic variation. Oakland, CA: California HealthCare Foundation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report is part of a series that examine the rates at which 13 elective procedures are delivered in different communities across the state of California. The report examines the geographic variation in elective childbirth procedures, including elective induction, cesarian sections (C-sections), and vaginal birth after cesarian (VBAC). Each procedure is defined, and the risks and benefits are addressed. Comparative statistics on the rate and type of elective procedures performed in each of the state's hospital service areas (HSAs) is presented in table format. The data is from the period 2005-2009 and is based on the patients’ place of residence.

Contact: California HealthCare Foundation, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 400, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 238-1040 Fax: (510) 238-1388 Web Site: http://www.chcf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Cesarian section, Childbirth, Geographic regions, Induced labor, Infant health, Reproductive health, State surveys, Vaginal birth after Cesarian section, Women's health

Risser A, King V, Davis E, Schechter M, Hickam D. 2010, 2009. Thinking about inducing your labor: A guide for pregnant women. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 3 items. (Effective health care program)

Annotation: This guide is designed to help pregnant women talk with their health care professional about elective induction of labor. It helps answer these questions: (1) What is elective induction? (2) What are the possible problems with elective induction? And (3) What don't we know yet about elective induction? Included are important things to consider and questions to ask your doctor or midwife. The guide does not cover labor induction for medical reasons. It is a companion publication to the clinician's guide, Elective Induction of Labor. The guide is available in English and Spanish. An audio (MP3) version and other related publications are also available.

Contact: AHRQ Publications Clearinghouse, U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, P.O. Box 8547, Silver Spring, MD 20907-8547, Telephone: (800) 358-9295 Secondary Telephone: (888) 586-6340 E-mail: ahrqpubs@ahrq.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov/news/pubcat/pubcat.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. no. 10-EHC004-A (English); 10-EHC004-B (Spanish).

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Childbirth, Consumer education materials, Induced labor, Infant health, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Reproductive health, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Linden DW, Paroli ET, Doron MW. 2010. Preemies: The essential guide for parents of premature babies. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Pocket Books, 633 pp.

Annotation: This book is written for expecting or new parents of premature babies. It is divided into the following sections: before birth, in the hospital, a life together, and other considerations. Before birth outlines some known causes of premature labor and birth and how to prevent them. Topics discussed in the second part include the premature delivery, the neonatal intensive care unit at the hospital, testing and possible complications that occur in the first week, settling down in the hospital, and if baby needs surgery. Part three covers decisions and preparations for taking baby home, what to expect and watch for during early development and possible consequences of prematurity. Part four talks about losing a premature baby and ways of coping with grief and what special arrangements should be expected. Also discussed are examples of famous premature babies that thrived. The appendices include conversion charts, growth charts, a schedule for multiples, cardiopulmonary resuscitation - birth to one year, and resources. A glossary and an index conclude the text.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-671-03491-X.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Infant death, Infant development, Infant health, Low birthweight, Neonatal intensive care units, Neonatal screening, Parent education, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy outcome, Premature infant diseases, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth

National Business Group on Health. 2010. Preterm birth and elective inductions prior to 37 weeks. [Washington, DC]: National Business Group on Health, 3 pp. (Health tips)

Annotation: This paper summarizes research findings on preterm births and early elective inductions in the United States, providing statistics on changes in the rate of preterm births and the health of babies born prior to 37 weeks. The paper also discusses the higher medical costs associated with late preterm births and offers guidelines to help employers reduce preterm births and the associated costs. Included are recommendations on elective deliveries provided by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), along with additional resources for both employers and employees. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational materials, Employer initiatives, Guidelines, Health care costs, Premature infants, Premature labor, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Statistics

Association of Public Health Laboratories. 2010. 2010 Newborn Screening and Genetics Testing Symposium. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories,

Annotation: This website provides information about the 2010 Newborn Screening and Genetic Testing Symposium held in Orlando, Florida, on May 3-6, 2010. The symposium brought together almost 400 laboratories, follow-up professionals, and metabolic specialists from around the world. The site presents the symposium schedule and provides links for presentations that have been authorized for posting. Meeting session topics included health information technology, education, program quality improvement, laboratory quality improvement, international perspectives, old conditions, new information, and candidate conditions.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Education, Genetic testing, Health, Information, Laboratory techniques, Neonatal screening, Programs, Technology

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.