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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

Sweetland J, Gibbons C, Vo C. 2017. Reframing school discipline: A strategic communications playbook. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines 12 evidence-based framing strategies that communicators in the education, justice, and civil rights sectors can use to challenge exclusionary discipline policies, build support for reducing racial disparities in disciplinary outcomes, and cultivate awareness of alternative approaches such as restorative justice and trauma-informed schools.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Communication, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Schools, Stress, Students, Trauma

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

FrameWorks Institute. 2016. Shifting gears on juvenile justice: A FrameWorks communications toolkit. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit models how to frame the juvenile justice system and related issues as important policy fields and matters of public concern. Topics include the science of adolescent development and the need to incorporate a developmental perspective into criminal justice policies designed for youth; why the current approaches to juvenile crime aren't working; and age-appropriate treatments and interventions that improve outcomes for those already in the system and preventive programs that divert more youth away from juvenile detention and towards programs that better serve their needs. Contents include sample "ready to go" communications that can be used as is or adapted and repurposed for an organization's needs, communications examples that demonstrate the "do's and don'ts" of the framing recommendations, graphics that model the key concepts of the recommendations, and annotations that explain the framing strategies being illustrated.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Communication, Interdisciplinary approach, Intervention, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Prevention, Public awareness materials, Systems development, Youth services

Sickmund M, Puzzanchera C, eds. 2015. Juvenile offenders and victims: 2014 national report. Pittsburgh, PA: National Center for Juvenile Justice, 230 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the most requested information about juveniles and the juvenile justice system in the United States. Contents include information about juvenile population characteristics, juvenile victims and offenders, juvenile justice system structure and process, law enforcement and juvenile crime, and juvenile offenders in court and correctional facilities.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Corrections, Criminal justice system, Data, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Juvenile offenders, Juveniles

National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk. 2015. Creating and maintaining good relationships between juvenile justice and education agencies. Washington, DC: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, 3 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet is designed to assist state and local justice and education agency administrators in creating strong working relationships that make high-quality education programs within juvenile justice settings possible. Topics include the importance of working together, the biggest challenges to good relationships, and working together toward a meaningful and sustainable partnership.

Contact: National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, American Institutes of Research, Washington, DC Web Site: http://www.neglected-delinquent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Educational programs, Juvenile justice, Local government, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resources for professionals, State departments of education, Sustainability

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2015. Family engagement inventory. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information about family engagement practices across child welfare, juvenile justice, behavioral health, education, and early education. Contents include links to organizations, agencies, and information that support family engagement within three domains. Contents include methods, plans of action, processes, and/or policies designed to be used by frontline staff of each discipline to enhance or achieve family engagement; links to and information on selected practices and programs that are validated and supported by a documented, evaluative process as they relate to family engagement; and links to information and websites that provide additional literature about family engagement processes, methods, and programs.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child welfare, Early childhood education, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Methods, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Participation, Research

U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime. 2014-. Through our eyes: Children, violence, and trauma. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, multiple items.

Annotation: This video series for child-serving professionals provides first-hand accounts of how adult survivors' exposure to violence as children has affected them. Topics include treatments that work, the child advocacy center model, community-based approaches, addressing violence in the home, interventions in schools, innovations in juvenile justice, and a call to action. A resource guide, poster gallery, resources for adult survivors, and related resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20531, Web Site: http://www.ovc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Injury prevention, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Multimedia, Safety, Schools, Trauma, Videos, Violence

Acoca L, Stephens J, Van Vleet A. 2014. Health coverage and care for youth in the juvenile justice system: The role of Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Data, Health insurance, High risk adolescents, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Program improvement, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Youth

Morgan E, Salomon N, Plotkin M, Cohen R. 2014. The school discipline consensus report: Strategies from the field to keep students engaged in school and out of the juvenile justice system. Lexington, KY: Council of State Governments, 436 pp.

Annotation: This report presents strategies to support educators and minimize school systems' dependence on suspension, expulsion, and arrest to manage student behaviors while promoting safe and productive learning environments that improve academic outcomes for all students and reduce their involvement in the juvenile justice system. Topics include conditions for learning, targeted behavioral interventions, school-police partnerships, courts and juvenile justice, information sharing, and data collection.

Contact: Council of State Governments, 2760 Research Park Drive, P. O. Box 11910, Lexington, KY 40578-1910, Telephone: (859) 244-8000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-1910 Fax: (859) 244-8001 E-mail: csg@csg.org Web Site: http://www.csg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Collaboration, Criminal justice system, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Learning, Policy development, Prevention programs, Public private partnerships, Risk factors, School age children, School attendance, School failure, School role, School safety, Students, Systems development

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Abram KM, Choe JY, Washburn JJ, Teplin LA, King DC, Dulcan MK, Bassett ED. 2014. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors among detained youth. U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 11 pp. (Juvenile Justice Bulletin )

Annotation: This bulletin examines suicidal thoughts and behaviors among 1,829 children and adolescents (ages 10 to 18) in the Northwestern Juvenile Project, a longitudinal study of children and adolescents detained at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Chicago, IL. Contents include a description of the study literature review and methods, and a discussion of the findings. Topics include hopelessness, thoughts about death and dying, thoughts about suicide, suicide plan, telling someone about suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and psychiatric disorders that may increase the odds of suicide attempts.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attempted suicide, Children, Juvenile justice, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Psychiatric disorders, Risk factors, Self destructive behavior, Statistical analysis

National Council of La Raza. (2013). Latino Kids Data Explorer. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza,

Annotation: This database is a user-friendly tool that provides data on Latino children in the United States. As an update and expansion of NCLR’s 2010 publication America’s Future: Latino Child Well-Being in Numbers and Trends, the Data Explorer offers 27 national- and state-level indicators of Latino child well-being, including demographic, health, education, housing, income, and juvenile justice variables. The data are available by age group (0–2, 0–4, 0–8, 0–17) and include time trend and racial/ethnic comparisons.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Data, Demography, Hispanic Americans, Juvenile justice, Socioeconomic status

Allen KD, Hendricks T. 2013. Medicaid and children in foster care. Washington DC: First Focus, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the health care needs of children in foster care and the role of Medicaid in providing health coverage for this population. The brief also highlights existing policy levers that may help address some of the health and well-being issues that children in foster care face.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Emotional instability, Foster care, Foster children, Health care systems, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Public policy

U.S. Department of Justice, Attorney General's Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. [2012]. Defending childhood: Protect, heal, thrive—Report of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Attorney General's Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence, 162 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings and recommendations of a task force of leaders dedicated to protecting children from exposure to violence and to healing those who have been exposed. The report presents an overview of the problem and sets forth 10 foundational recommendations; offers a series of additional recommendations to ensure the reliable screening, assessment, and support of children exposed to violence; discusses effectively integrating prevention, intervention, and resilience across systems; and calls for a new approach to juvenile justice.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20530-0001, Telephone: (202) 353-1555 E-mail: askDOJ@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.justice.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Children, Family support services, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Screening, Service delivery systems, Treatment, Violence, Violence prevention

Gottesman D, Schwartz SW. 2011. Juvenile justice in the U.S.: Facts for policymakers. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information and statistics on adolescents who have been involved in the juvenile justice system or who have been charged for serious or violent legal offenses. The fact sheet examines trends during the period from 1999 to 2008, comparing changes in the types of crimes committed and the gender, race, and ethnicity of offenders, The sheet also discusses the mental health needs of juvenile offenders; the mental health services currently available to them; the decision-making process during which the court determines whether or not a juvenile will be tried as a child or as an adult; and the residential placement facilities and alternative community centers that serve this youth population. Examples of effective community-based facilities for juvenile offenders and cost comparison data are also provided. A summary of the challenges and a list of recommendations for improved outcomes are also included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Data, Juvenile courts, Juvenile justice, Statistics, Trends, Youth

Crowe MN. 2011. Children's mental health in Virginia: System deficiencies and unknown outcomes. [Richmond, VA]: Voices for Virginia's Children, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report describes pediatric mental health services available through agencies within Virginia's Secretariat of Health and Human Resources. It also touches on services provided in the state's schools and the juvenile justice system. The report provides information about the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, the Office of Comprehensive Services, the Department of Medical Assistance Services, and the juvenile justice system. Each section discusses services offered, expenditures, and the number of children and adolescents receiving services.

Contact: Voices for Virginia's Children, 701 East Franklin Street, Suite 807, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 649-0184 Fax: (804) 649-0161 E-mail: voices@vakids.org Web Site: http://www.vakids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Juvenile justice, Mental health programs, Mental health services, Schools, State mental health agencies, State programs, Virginia

Mather M, Foxen P. 2010. America's future: Latino child well-being in numbers and trends. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza, 29 pp.

Annotation: This data book offers a comprehensive overview of the state of Latino children and adolescents under age 18 in the United States by integrating a range of key factors and outcomes in the areas of demography, citizenship, family structure, poverty, health, education, and juvenile justice. The data book provides an overview of current national and state-level trends from Latino children and adolescents relative to non-Hispanic white and black children and adolescents, documenting both regional variations and changing trends since the year 2000. Topics include population trends and geographic distribution, nativity status and citizenship, family structure and income, education and language, health, and juvenile justice.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Children, Education, Families, Health, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Juvenile justice, Language, Language barriers, Medical home, Obesity, Poverty, Statistical data, Trends, Uninsured persons

Child Welfare League of America. 2010. The nation's children 2010. Arlington, VA: Child Welfare League of America, 10 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistical information about children in the United States in 2010. In addition to general information, the fact sheet presents information about the most vulnerable children, child abuse and neglect, permanent families for children, kinship support, child poverty and income support, child care and Head Start, health, child and youth mental health, substance abuse and child welfare, vulnerable youth, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, funding child welfare services, and the child welfare work force. Separate fact sheets are available for each state and the District of Columbia, as well.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Juvenile justice, Statistics, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child care, Child health, Child neglect, Child welfare services, Children, Families, Financing, Head Start, Juvenile delinquency, Low income groups, Mental health, Poverty, Prevention, Substance abuse, Substance abuse, Vulnerability

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined and assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 18 in relation to the preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies, by building upon the evaluations of other entities and reviewing their findings, conclusions, and recommendations. The report includes findings, conclusions, and recommendations on the following topics: physical health, mental health, and trauma; child care; child welfare; elementary and secondary education; sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; transportation; juvenile justice; evacuation; and relevant activities in emergency management.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no. 10-M037; ISBN 978-1-58763-401-7.

Keywords: Adolescent heath, Adolescents, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Costs, Disaster planning, Education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Infants, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Transportation, Trauma

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2010. 2010 report to the President and Congress. Washington, DC: National Commission on Children and Disasters, 185 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study that assessed the needs of infants, children, and adolescents in relation to preparation for, response to, and recovery from all hazards, including major disasters and emergencies. The report includes specific findings, conclusions, and recommendations relating to (1) child health, mental health, and trauma; (2) child care in all settings; (3) child welfare; (4) elementary and secondary education; (5) sheltering, temporary housing, and affordable housing; (6) transportation; (7) juvenile justice; (8) evacuation; and (9) relevant activities in emergency management. The report also provides specific recommendations on the need for planning and establishing a national resource center on children and disasters and discusses the coordination of resources and services, administrative actions, policies, regulations, and legislative changes.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child care, Child health, Costs, Disaster planning, Disasters, Elementary education, Emergencies, Housing, Infant health, Juvenile justice, Legislation, Mental health, Public policy, Research, Secondary education, Service coordination, Transportation, Trauma

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.