Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (33 total).

Harrison P. n.d.. Comprehensive Health Services System for Youth Offenders: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 34 pp.

Annotation: This 3-year demonstration project sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health services for adolescents detained or housed in institutional settings within the State Juvenile Service Agency (JSA). The overall purpose was to establish a link between the state Title V agency and the Juvenile Services Agency to assist the JSA to (1) determine the particular characteristics, health needs, and concerns of their adolescent population and (2) develop and manage appropriate comprehensive health systems as a model for the nation. The project designed a health information system (consisting of a personal computer using D-Base III plus software) to monitor the health status of the population and a training handbook for Juvenile Justice personnel. Information obtained regarding health status of the population was used in designing training materials for juvenile justice staff. Further training needs were identified by conducting an in-depth needs assessment and analysis. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-242008.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Continuing Education, High risk adolescents, Juvenile Delinquents, Nurses

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Fact sheet: Impact of the ACA on vulnerable youth. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines implications of the Affordable Care Act for specific populations of adolescents and young adults including those aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. Contents include common characteristics of these populations and the obstacles that could prevent them from securing health insurance coverage. Topics include state Medicaid expansion and complexities of the application and enrollment process. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Implementing the Affordable Care Act: How much will it help vulnerable adolescents and young adults?. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores the implications of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for adolescents and young adults who are aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. For each group, the brief provides an overview of demographic characteristics and health status, and discusses access to health care and health insurance before and after the ACA. The brief concludes with a discussion of common themes and upcoming challenges for the three populations. An accompanying fact sheet summarizes the ACA's implications for these groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

National Collaboration for Youth. 2012. Building a brighter future: An essential agenda for America's young people. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Collaboration for Youth, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report presents federal public policy recommendations that are intended to improve children's health, safety, and well-being, and improve the education system with the goals of saving money, strengthening families, producing a more educated work force, and laying a base for America that will thrive into the next century. Topics covered include early childhood, education, after-school and summer programs, child welfare, healthy children and adolescents, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, runaway and homeless adolescents, adolescent services, and adolescent employment.

Contact: National Human Services Assembly, 1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 347-2080 Fax: (202) 393-4517 E-mail: wowens@nassembly.org Web Site: http://www.nassembly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, After school programs, Child health, Early childhood education, Education, Employment, Homelessness, Juvenile delinquents, Poverty, Prevention, Public policy, Runaways, Safety

National Fatherhood Initiative. [2004]. Family structure, father closeness, and delinquency. Gaithersburg, MD: National Fatherhood Initiative, 29 pp.

Annotation: Using both a bivariate regression model and several multiple regression models, this paper sets out to test the hypothesis that family structure has a significant impact on the level of risk of adolescent delinquency even when controlling for other factors that encourage or inhibit delinquent acts. The paper also explores why family structure is important in determining delinquency in adolescents, and, specifically, it explores the role of "father closeness, " both in accounting for the importance of an intact family as an inhibitor of delinquency and as an important factor inhibiting delinquency in its own right. The paper includes an executive summary. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a list of references.

Contact: National Fatherhood Initiative, 101 Lake Forest Boulevard, Suite 360 , Gaithersburg, MD 20877, Telephone: (301) 948-0599 Fax: (301) 948-4325 Web Site: http://www.fatherhood.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, High risk adolescents, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Risk factors

National Institute of Justice. 2004. Evaluating G.R.E.A.T.: A school-based gang prevention program. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, 4 pp. (Research for policy)

Annotation: This report summarizes results of a 5-year study of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program, a 9-hour gang prevention program administered by uniformed law enforcement officers to middle school students.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NCJ 198604.

Keywords: Community programs, Gangs, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Law enforcement, Middle schools, Program evaluation, Students

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1997. At-risk and delinquent youth: Multiple programs lack coordinated federal effort. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the 1997 Congressional testimony of the Associate Director for Education and Employment Issues for the U.S. Government Accounting Office on the effectiveness of Federal programs for at-risk and delinquent youth. Issues addressed include: 1) who administers federal programs serving at-risk and delinquent youth; 2) how much money is spent on these programs; and 3) what is known about their effectiveness. The appendices detail spending amounts and specific services provided by federal agencies and their programs for fiscal year 1996. The report includes references.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/T-HEHS-98-38.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessment, Federal assistance, Federal legislation, Health care financing, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Outcome evaluation, Policy analysis, Program coordination, Program evaluation, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention, Violence prevention, Vocational education

Laudencia A. 1997. Diverting our children from crime: Family-centered, community-based strategies for prevention. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Graduate Public Policy Program; Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 27 pp. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This report provides a brief introduction to issues addressed by a DC Family Policy Seminar in May 1997 which focused on prevention of juvenile crime in the District of Columbia and provided research and program information on crime prevention strategies. The seminar organizers wanted to encourage collaboration among nonprofit organizations, government, community members, and families in order to curb juvenile crime rates in the District of Columbia. This report provides an overview of the problem of juvenile crime locally and nationally, presents research concerning the risk factors associated with juvenile crime, discusses innovative youth crime prevention models, and highlights current prevention programs in the District of Columbia. Appendices give a list of national resources, and District resources. Also included is a bibliography of works cited. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community based services, Crime prevention, District of Columbia, Juvenile delinquents, Prevention programs

David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children. 1996. The juvenile court. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Center for the Future of Children, 160 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.). (The future of children; v. 6, no. 3, Winter 1996)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" analyzes the role and procedures of the juvenile courts, including how they handle juvenile crime, status offenses such as truancy, and child abuse and neglect. Final chapters discuss current trends and make recommendations to improve the system.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Family support services, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Statistics

Huertas A Jr, Sullivan C. 1995. Safe schools within safe communities: A regional summit in the heartland. Oak Brook, IL: North Central Regional Educational Laboratory, 19 pp. (Policy briefs: Special report; October 1995)

Annotation: This report documents a seminar where information was shared about existing violence prevention policies, legislation, resources, success stories, and state initiatives. Those attending developed a long-range, coordinated state policy agenda and action plan for safe schools. The keynote speech, Minnesota's plan of action, selected community examples, and the summaries of the attending states' action planning session are included in this report.

Keywords: Budgeting, Budgets, Iowa, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Regional programs, School safety, South Dakota, Violence prevention

Allegheny County Health Department. [1994?]. Health status and needs assessment of children in Allegheny County. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Health Department, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report on the health needs of children in Allegheny County includes the physical, environmental, social, and mental aspects of health. New morbidity is a prime focus of this report. Demographics for distribution of household income, overall population distribution and distribution by race are featured. Statistics are reported for chronic conditions, immunization rates, infectious diseases, tuberculosis, nutrition and psychical activity/fitness, and dental conditions. Maps designate the areas of high risk for natality, mortality, and behavior.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Crime, Demographics, Juvenile delinquents, Morbidity, Mortality, Needs assessment, Pennsylvania, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistics

Altschuler DM, Armstrong TL. 1994. Intensive aftercare for high-risk juveniles: A community care model—Program summary. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 20 pp. (OJJDP summary)

Annotation: This report summarizes a research program exploring options in intensive community-based aftercare programs for paroled juveniles who initially require secure confinement. The report provides a theoretical background, assesses critical issues in intensive aftercare, and proposes a model for developing such programs. The authors consider future research topics and include a bibliography. A related publication, "Intensive Aftercare for High-risk Juveniles: Policies and Procedures, " includes an overview of the structure and function of key program elements and components.

Contact: Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Fax: (301) 519-5600 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/ProgSummary.asp?pi=2 Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: NCJ 147575.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community programs, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Model programs, Prevention programs

Altschuler DM, Armstrong TL. 1994. Intensive aftercare for high-risk juveniles: Policies and procedures—Program summary. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 28 pp. (OJJDP summary)

Annotation: This report provides policies and procedures that are needed for establishing intensive community-based aftercare programs for paroled juveniles. These programs are run by public or private corrections agencies for juvenile offenders who initially require secure confinement. The authors provide an overview of an intervention model for juvenile intensive aftercare programs and suggest policies and procedures for developing such programs. Topics discussed include overarching case management, individual case planning, the integration of surveillance and services based on risk factors, providing balanced incentives and graduated sanctions, incorporating service brokerage and linkages to social networks, and managing information and program evaluation. A related publication, "Intensive Aftercare for High-risk Juveniles: A Community Care Model, " provides a theoretical background for the model.

Contact: Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Fax: (301) 519-5600 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/ProgSummary.asp?pi=2 Single copies available at no charge. Document Number: NCJ 147712.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community programs, Juvenile delinquents, Juvenile justice, Manuals, Model programs, Prevention programs

Elliott D, Huizinga D, Menard S. 1989. Multiple problem youth: Delinquency, substance use, and mental health problems. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag, 266 pp. (Research in criminology)

Annotation: This book addresses the major epidemiological and etiological issues raised at a conference on juvenile offenders with serious drug, alcohol, and mental health problems. The April 1984 conference was developed by the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Using data from the National Youth Survey, it provides estimates of the joint distribution of these problem behaviors in the adolescent population, their demographic correlates, the developmental patterns in the onset of these behaviors, the extent to which one problem may be predictive of another, and the extent to which these different problems may have common underlying causes. Methodological, theoretical, and policy implications are presented.

Keywords: Adolescents, Conferences, Epidemiology, Etiology, Juvenile delinquents, Mental health, Substance abuse

Brown BS, Mills AR, eds. 1987, 1990r. Youth at high risk for substance abuse. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 181 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on presentations from a technical review on Special Youth Populations - What Etiology Suggests About Prevention and Treatment Programming held July 1986 and sponsored by the Division of Prevention and Communications of the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The report focuses on four youthful populations in an effort to understand both their degree of risk for substance abuse and the etiologic factors involved in such risk. The four populations include: children of substance abusers; delinquent youth; foster care youth; and runaways. The effectiveness of various prevention and treatment services for these young people is discussed.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Foster care, Juvenile delinquents, Prevention, Runaways, Substance abuse, Treatment

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1969. The Children's Bureau's job today. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 73 pp. ([Children's Bureau publication])

Annotation: This document describes the work of the Children's Bureau. The Bureau's work with infant mortality, maternity and infant care projects, family planning, comprehensive child welfare services, child care services, services for crippled children, cooperative mechanisms, and treatment of juvenile offenders are discussed. The second section of the document describes the Children's Bureau programs including graphical statistical reports. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child care services, Child welfare, Children with developmental disabilities, Children's Bureau, Cooperation, Family planning, Federal MCH programs, Infant care, Infant mortality, Juvenile delinquents, Maternity and Infant Care Projects, Obstetrical care, Reports, Statistics

Hippchen LJ with Ligons D. 1966. Personnel and personnel practices in public institutions for delinquent children: A survey. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 29 pp. (Children's Bureau statistical series; no. 86)

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1960-1969. Juvenile court statistics. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 9 v. (Children's Bureau statistical series; nos. 61 (covers 1959), 65 (covers 1960), 69 (covers 1961), 73 (covers 1962), 79 (covers 1963), 83 (covers 1964), 85 (covers 1965), 90 (covers 1966), 93 (covers 1967))

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1958. Children and youth: Their health and welfare. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, [99] pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 363-1957)

Annotation: A publication of the U.S. Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child protection agencies, Child welfare, Children with special health care needs, Children's Bureau, Federal aid, Juvenile courts, Juvenile delinquents, MCH services, State aid, State grants, Welfare services

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1956-. Statistics on public institutions for delinquent children, 19__. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, v. (Children's Bureau statistical series; nos. 78 (covers 1963), 89 (covers 1966), 94 (covers 1967))

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.