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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 11 (11 total).

Langelier M, Surdu S, Rodat C, Moore J, Kottek A. 2016. Survey of federally qualified health centers to understand participation with dental residency programs and student externship rotations. Rensselaer, NY: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, 100 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes findings from a survey of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) asking questions about the FQHC's participation in dental student externship or dental residency programs and the impact of that participation on recruitment and retention of dentists in the FQHC. Contents include an executive summary and a technical report with the study background, objectives, methods, findings, discussion, limitations, and conclusions. Topics include prevalence and differences in prevalence of oral health services provided to children and/or adults by FQHCs participating in dental residency or student externship programs.

Contact: Oral Health Workforce Research Center, New York Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, SUNY, School of Public Health, 1 University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 Web Site: http://www.oralhealthworkforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Children, Community health centers, Internship and residency, National surveys, Oral health, Personnel recruitment, Prevalence, Retention, Service learning, Statistical data, Work force

Cottam W, Demby NA. 2014. Partnering with academic institutions and residency programs to develop service learning programs. Denver, CO: National Network for Oral Health Access, 17 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides information on how health centers can partner with academic institutions or dental residency programs to offer service learning programs at health centers and thereby foster interest in health center careers among future health professionals. The paper explores different collaboration models and provides suggestions about issues for health centers to consider when deciding whether to launch service learning programs. Topics include the benefits of partnership, educational models, planning considerations, successful partnerships, challenges, and recommendations.

Contact: National Network for Oral Health Access, 181 East 56th Avenue, Suite 501, Denver, CO 80216, Telephone: (866) 316-4995 Fax: (866) 316-4995 E-mail: info@nnoha.org Web Site: http://www.nnoha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Careers, Collaboration, Community health centers, Internship and residency, Model programs, Oral health, Professional education, Professional training, Public private partnerships, Work force

American Academy of Pediatrics, Mental Health Leadership Work Group. 2014. Mental health initiatives: Residency curriculum. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 v.

Annotation: This set of teaching materials is designed to help clinic preceptors train pediatric residents to address common mental health issues in the primary care setting. It contains two modules that are designed to help residents (1) use evidence-based approaches to engage children and families in managing mental health concerns, and (2) recognize and provide initial management for children and adolescents with mild to moderate anxiety in the primary care setting.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Internship and residency, Mental health, Pediatric care management, Training

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, Oral Health Section. [2010]. 2008-2009 annual report: North Carolina Oral Health Section. [Raleigh, NC]: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, Oral Health Section, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the activities of the North Carolina Oral Health Section in planning and providing a statewide science-based oral health program. Program services include oral health education and screening for children, as well as for the adults who influence their health, to reduce tooth decay and promote oral health. Five program areas are described: disease prevention, access to care, monitoring systems, health education and promotion, and residency training in dental public health. A map of North Carolina shows program providers and services by county.

Contact: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Oral Health Section, 2001 Mail Service Center, 5505 Six Forks Road, Raleigh, NC 27699-2001, Telephone: (919) 855-4800 Fax: (919) 870-4805 Web Site: http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dph/oralhealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Internship and residency, North Carolina, Oral health, Population surveillance, State programs, Statewide planning

Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, Center for Healthier Communities. 2010. Pre-natal providers' oral health knowledge doesn't equal behavior. [San Diego, CA]: Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, Center for Healthier Communities, 1 p. (Community health brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a survey of obstetrician-gynecologists and certified nurse-midwives to compare the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to oral health as part of prenatal care. Contents include background, training in oral health care during residency, differences in knowledge and behavior among recent and earlier graduates, and barriers in translating oral health knowledge into practice.

Contact: Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123, Telephone: (858) 576-1700 Web Site: https://www.rchsd.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitude change, Barriers, Behavior change, Comparative analysis, Gynecologists, Internship and residency, Knowledge level, Nurse-midwives, Obstetricians, Oral health, Prenatal care, Research, Training

Nazarian BL, Epstein SG, Allen D, Fluet C, Glader LJ, Sadof M. 2008. Preparing for practice: Addressing special health care needs in pediatric residency programs. Boston, MA: New England SERVE, 44 pp.

Annotation: This monograph describes a 2006-2007 study that looks at the knowledge and skill pediatricians bring to the care of children with special health care needs. It surveys five pediatric residency training programs in Massachusetts. Five domains frame the results of the study: family centered care, communicating with families, medical home, coordinating care, and advocacy and financing. Appendices contain survey materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: New England SERVE, 101 Tremont Street, Suite 812, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 574-9493 Fax: (617) 574-9608 Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health services, Children with special health care needs, Internship and residency, Knowledge level, Massachusetts, Pediatrics, Professional training, Quality assessment, Service coordination, Service delivery system

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Yamashita L, Ambrose A. 1998. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: A manual for pediatric residents. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 165 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Contact Phone: (808) 536-7702 Ext. 2224 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Ambrose A. 1997. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: Facilitator's manual (Draft). Honolulu, HI: Health and Education Collaboration Project, Hawaii Medical Association, 157 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Out of print.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1995. Maternal and Child Health Bureau Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrics Fellowship Training Programs: Evaluation summary. [No place: No publisher], 136 pp.

Annotation: This summary report describes first eight years of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau training programs in Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrics (BDP), which started in 1986 with grants to eleven medical school and hospitals. The report includes chapters about the following: components of the educational program; types of training received by medical students and pediatric residents; evaluations of the program by current fellows; professional accomplishments of former fellows; academic productivity of program faculty; postgraduate education; new programs initiated; and the impact of fellowship programs. The concluding summary is an argument for continuation of the program as an cost-effective investment in our nation's future. Appendices include: BDP Training Program components; fellowship evaluation forms summary; and a compilation of publications by program faculty and fellows. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral medicine, Curricula, Developmental pediatrics, Federal grants, Fellowships, Internship and residency, MCH training programs, Medical education, Medical students, Pediatricians, Pediatrics, Productivity, Professional education, Professional training, Program evaluation, Publications, Research methodology, Statistics

Council on Graduate Medical Education. 1994. Recommendations to improve access to health care through physician workforce reform: 4th report to Congress and the Department of Health and Human Services secretary. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report recommends legislative proposals to increase the number of physicians practicing general medicine in order to meet the public's health care needs in the 21st century. It identifies shortage areas and suggests reforms to modify the workforce including those that help finance graduate medical education, improve minority representation, and promote more general practitioners in the profession. It reviews current trends to determine deficiencies in the supply of doctors, considers the impact of adopting the Council's goals and recommendations, reviews options that are available to achieve the goals, and suggests legislative actions to achieve them.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Contact Phone: (301) 443-6326 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Careers, Family physicians, Financing, Graduate education, Health services, Internship and residency, Medical education, Medical students, Minority groups, Physicians, Policy development, Public health, Work force

Ambulatory Pediatric Association. 1990. Educating pediatric residents to provide health care to underserved children: A conference sponsored by the Ambulatory Pediatric Association. McLean, VA: Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 102 pp.

Annotation: These are the proceedings of a conference held in Alexandria, Virginia, March 4-5, 1990. The conference focused on issues related to educating pediatric residents to provide health care to children who are currently underserved. The proceedings include a list of the participants, recommendations based upon the conference, and the papers presented at the conference accompanied by responses and open discussions. Papers included the following topics, among others: understanding the challenge to residents and inspiring them to action, helping residents learn to nurture the unnurtured, organizing practices for underserved children, and models that can be used to educate residents. The models focused on children in urban areas, rural Midwestern children, the working poor and illegal aliens, and children of migrant farm workers. Other topics included methods of financing health care for these children and issues in public policy. [The conference was funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Academic Pediatric Association, 6728 Old McLean Village, McLean, VA 22101, Telephone: (703) 556-9222 Fax: (703) 556-8729 E-mail: info@academicpeds.org Web Site: http://www.ambpeds.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Conferences, Curricula, Educational objectives, Health care financing, Internship and residency, Pediatricians, Public policy, Underserved communities

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.