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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (60 total).

University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Ethnicity and maternal and child health care. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This unpublished document contains a set of 4 teaching modules: (1) Ethnicity and Healthy Birth Outcomes; (2) Ethnicity and Genetic Disease; (3) Culture and AIDS Prevention in Adolescents; and (4) Using the Internet in Maternal and Child Health. Each of the modules contains lesson objectives; a suggested reading list followed by a section of summaries; and suggested assignments and class presentations geared towards the objectives discussed at the beginning of each module. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Maryland School of Social Work, Center for Maternal and Child Health Social Work Education, 525 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-7533 Fax: (410) 706-6046 Web Site: http://cmchswe.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Ethnic factors, Internet, MCH training, Maternal health

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: A family guide (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide, intended primarily for parents of children with sickle cell disease, includes information on how to manage this disease. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) acknowledgements, (2) dedication, (3) how to use this guide, (4) introduction, (5) emergency telephone numbers, (6) warning signs, (7) common questions, (8) medical care, (9) new approaches to treatment, (10) daily living, (11) medical words, (12) sickle cell disease on the Internet, (13) sickle cell treatment centers, (14) directory of sickle cell treatment centers in New Jersey, and (15) directory of genetic counseling centers in New Jersey.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Internet, Medical terminology, New Jersey, Patient care management, Patient education materials, Sickle cell disease, Therapeutics

Hilfiker S, Robison S, Petti MA, Miller B, eds. 2015. Health literacy online (2nd ed.). Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides guidance on why and how to design health websites and other digital health-information tools for all users. Topics include what we know about users with limited literacy skills, writing actionable content, displaying content clearly on the page, organizing content and simplifying navigation, engaging users, and testing your site with users with limited literacy skills. A printable checklist of strategies, an overview of user research, and an annotated bibliography are included.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Design, Guidelines, Health education, Information dissemination, Interactive media, Internet, Low literacy, Manuals, Online systems, Oral health

Harris JL, Schwartz MB, Shehan C, Hyary M, Appel J, Haraghey K, Li X. 2015. Snack FACTS 2015: Evaluating snack food nutrition and marketing to youth. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 102 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of snack food marketing in the United States. Topics include the current status of the nutritional quality of snack foods marketed to children and adolescents on television, the internet, and in schools; the amount of snack food advertising in all media by brand, company, and category including comparisons from five years earlier, and young people's exposure to snack food advertising on television and the internet.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advertising, Children, Internet, Measures, Nutrition, Schools, Snacks, Television, Trends

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Children's Safety Network. 2014. Internet safety: 2014 resource guide. Waltham, MA: Children's Safety Network, 14 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides links to organizations, programs, publications, and resources focused on Internet safety, as well as information on a variety of subtopics related to the Internet, including: alcohol and drugs, cyberbullying, sexting, social networking, and suicide and self-harm. Each item in the guide includes a short description and a link to the resource itself. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication skills, Internet, Mental health, Online systems, Relationships, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Safety

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. Using visual apps to connect with your target audience on social networks. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webinar serves as an orientation to social media and e-learning technologies for MCH and public health professionals. It covers the recent accessibility of social media apps (Instagram, Pinterest, Vine, FiLMiC Pro, and Path) that can maximize the visibility of public health programs. The webinar discusses best practices, provides tips and tricks to help engage target audiences, and explains how to leverage social media networks such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter in maternal and child health programs. Case studies that successfully demonstrate the influence of social media are also presented and discussed.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Continuing education, Information sources, Internet, MCH training, Public health, Social media, Technology

Kachur R, Mesnick J, Liddon N, Kapsimalis C, Habel M, David-Ferdon C, Brown K, Gloppen K, Tevendale H, Gelaude DJ, Romero L, Seitz H, Heldman AB, Schindelar,J. 2013. Adolescents, technology and reducing risk for HIV, STDs and pregnancy. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 68 pp.

Annotation: This white paper provides an overview of the ways in which digital technology can be used to improve the sexual health of adolescents. It includes a brief summary of adolescents (including their demography, development, and sexual behavior) and provides an overview of the new digital technologies and media that youth are using. These include networking sites (SNS), video sharing, blogs, instant messaging, mobile technology, and virtual worlds. The paper examines technology’s potential for use in sexual health promotion as well as the risks associated with misuse of digital technology. Included are examples of innovative adolescent sexual health interventions that have used digital technology to improve their reach and effectiveness.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, HIV, Health promotion, Information sources, Internet, Prevention, Risk reduction, Social media, Technology

Haigler P. 2012. Using social media tools to advocate for infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document describes common social media tools and presents tips on how they can be used to reach policymakers, the media, fellow advocates, and others who have the ability to influence public policy to positively affect outcomes for infants, toddlers, and families. The document explains what social media is and discusses social networking and blogging.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Families, Public policy, World Wide Web, Internet, Young children

American Public Health Association, Health Communication Working Group. [2011]. A guidance document to the navigation and use of the Healthy People 2020 website. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, Health Communication Working Group, 4 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes the Healthy People 2020 website and explains how online users (public health professionals as well as the general public) can take advantage of the site's features. It includes a brief overview of the Healthy People 2020 initiative, including its overarching goals; a description of the features on the site's home page; and summaries of the information available in each section of the site. The guide also describes the site's relational database called Closer Look, Health Disparities, which can be used to access a wide variety of data from federal agencies. Information on external Web 2.0 tools, mobile applications, and GIS-mapping data sites is also provided.

Contact: HealthyPeople.gov, Web Site: http://www.healthypeople.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Guidelines, Health status disparities, Healthy People 2020, Information sources, Information systems, Internet, Technology, World wide web

Solomon L. 2011. Doing social media so it matters: A librarian's guide. Chicago,IL: American Library Association, 80 pp. (ALA editions: special reports)

Annotation: This guide explains how libraries can use social media to enhance the services provided by their libraries. It describes how libraries can use tools such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and Linked-In to create and promote resources and services and to enhance the patron's library experience. The guide includes practical advice on choosing, using, and monitoring tools effectively. It explains how to obtain administrative and staff buy-in and how to write a social media policy. It discusses the concept of social capital; recommends strategies for achieving social media success; and suggests methods for evaluating social media services. Best practices and additional resources are provided.

Contact: American Library Association, 50 East Huron, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (800) 545-2433 Secondary Telephone: (888) 814-7692 Fax: (312) 944-3897 E-mail: library@ala.org Web Site: http://www.ala.org $40.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8389-1067-2.

Keywords: Communication, Diffusion of innovation, Guidelines, Information sources, Internet, Library services, Model programs, Social media, Standards, Technology

CityMatCH and Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative. [2010]. MCH life course toolbox. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This toolbox is an online resource for maternal and child health researchers, academics, practitioners, policy advocates, and others in the field. The toolbox shares information, strategies, and tools related to integrating the life course perspective into MCH research at the local, state, and national levels. The life course perspective looks at health not as disconnected stages by as an integrated continuum. Areas covered include theory and research, practice, education and training, and policy. There are also a life course game, a discussion board, and additional resources.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health, Internet, MCH research, Women's health

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. 2010. Open wide: Oral health training for health professionals. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 1 v.

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to help health and early childhood professionals working in community settings (e.g., Head Start, home visiting, WIC staff) promote oral health in the course of promoting general health for infants, children, and their families. Topics include tooth decay, risk factors, and prevention; oral health risk assessment and oral health screening; and anticipatory guidance for parents. Each of the four modules includes an overview, learning objectives, key points, a post-test, and resources. A glossary and a list of presentations, print materials, and videotapes are also presented. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anticipatory guidance, Child care providers, Child health, Curricula, Dental caries, Distance education, Families, Head Start, Health personnel, High risk children, Infant health, Internet, Oral health, Parents, Prevention, Risk factors, Screening, WIC Program

National Association of County and City Health Officials. [2009]. Maternal, child, and adolescent health toolkit. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials,

Annotation: This online toolkit contains downloadable resources highlighting programs and practices to help local health departments with their work related to maternal and child health and adolescent health. The toolkit is divided into the following categories: programs, publications, toolbox, public health advocacy, press room, and membership. Users may also request help (including help finding a tool), bookmark tools, and submit tools.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, City agencies, Community agencies, Internet, MCH, Maternal health, Programs, Public health, Resource materials, World Wide Web

Fox S, Jones S. 2009. The social life of health information: Americans' pursuit of health takes place within a widening network of both online and offline sources. Washington, DC: Pew Internet and American Life Project, 72 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a national survey about the social impact of the Internet on health care. Topics include types of Internet or traditional sources used by consumers, how information gathered is used to communicate with health professionals, and who is likely to be using which services. Contents include a summary of findings, the shifting landscape, social media and health, readers and listeners versus writers and creators, the impact of online health resources, and trends to watch.

Contact: Pew Internet and American Life Project, 1615 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-4500 Fax: 202-419-4505 E-mail: data@pewinternet.org Web Site: http://www.pewinternet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education, Health attitudes, Health literacy, Information sources, Internet, Patient education, Physician patient relations, Social media, Surveys, Trends, World Wide Web

Brown B, Marin P. 2009. Adolescents and electronic media: Growing up plugged in. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes research relating electronic media use to adolescent physical health and safety, social development, and educational outcomes. It portrays trends in electronic media use among adolescents, describes inequalities in access to electronic media, and discusses implications for policy, future research, and data collection.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Films, Internet, Mass media, Media violence, Television, Theater

CityMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2008. Internet-based HIV/STI prevention interventions for adolescents. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH; Washington, DC: National Association of City and County Health Officials, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This Webcast hosts Powerpoint and audio files from three presentations. The first examines adolescent and youth sexual activity; what types of technology youth and adolescents use, how, and why; how technology is and can be used for STD/HIV prevention. The second examines the validity of four popular public health mindsets: youth will prioritize the sites public health organizations create for them, offline strategies for STD/HIV prevention will work online, youths' risk for HIV/STD is based on their individual characteristics, and "the problem is the lack of the solution that we already have in mind." The third describes various online STD/HIV prevention programs and explores their use. Online use and techniques and their use in a clinic setting are also discussed. A question and answer session follows. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, HIV, Internet, Multimedia, Prevention programs, STDs, Sexual behavior, Technology, Telecommunications, Youth

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2006. Expanding the reach and impact of consumer e-health tools. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 216 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the electronic health tools that offer many consumers a broad range of integrated, interactive functions to enable personal health management. The report seeks to lay the foundation for a robust, population-wide, and consumer-centric e-heath enterprise. It outlines a vision, identifies challenges and opportunities, and highlights strategies for using electronic health tools to improve personal and population health. Chapters include (1) introduction, (2) mapping diversity to understand users' requirements for e-health tools, (3) assessing the evidence for e-health tools for diverse users, (4) strategic factors in realizing the potential of e-health, and (5) partnerships for meaningful access. A conclusion and references are included. The report includes four appendices: (1) environmental scan of 40 e-health tools, (2) project interviewees, experts consulted, and reviewers, (3) chapter 3 literature review summary, and (4) a comparison of Internet use and health status of populations that experience health disparities.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Electronic publications, Health, Internet, Low income groups, Public health

Center for the Advancement of Distance Education. 2005. Public health distance learning survey results. Chicago, IL: Center for the Advancement of Distance Education, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report provides results from a survey on distance learning sent to 3, 000 public health professionals, faculty, students, family representatives, and officials. Responses were collected from January 27 through February 11, 2005. Responses to each survey question are presented in tables and figures. A list of topics generated by the open-ended question: "Please enter topics that you would like to see covered by webcasts in the next 12 months" is also presented.

Contact: Center for the Advancement of Distance Education, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor Street, Room 1054 (MC 923), Chicago, IL 60612-4394, Telephone: (312) 996-2233 Fax: (312) 413-2054 E-mail: cade@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.uic.edu/sph/cade Available from the website.

Keywords: Distance education, Internet, Surveys, Training, World Wide Web

Weiss HB, Faughnan K, Caspe M, Wolos C, Lopez ME, Kreider H. 2005. Taking a closer look: A guide to online resources on family involvement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project, 49 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide contains annotated Web links to recent (published in 2000 or afterwards) research, information, and tools about family involvement, including parenting practices to support children's learning and development, home-school relationships, parent leadership development, and collective engagement for school improvement and reform. The guide is divided into the following seven sections: (1) knowledge development, (2) professional development, (3) standards, (4) programs, (5) tools, (6) convening, and (7) special initiatives. Each section includes an annotated list of resources with a description of the resource and a link to where it can be found on the Web. The resources in each section are also grouped into content areas that share a common theme or type of publication, and there is a brief description for each section. The resource guide includes one appendix that lists the organizations included in the guide in alphabetical order and notes the sections where the organizations can be found.

Contact: Global Family Research Project™, Third Sector New England, 89 South Street, Boston, MA 02111, E-mail: info@GlobalFRP.org Web Site: http://www.GlobalFRP.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Family school relations, Initiatives, Internet, Parenting, Programs, Resource materials, Schools, Standards

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.