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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Gladden RM, Vivolo-Kantor AM, Hamburger ME, Lumpkin CD. 2014. Bullying surveillance among youths: Uniform definitions for public health and recommended data elements–Version 1.0. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 104 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help organizations, researchers, evaluators, community groups, educators, and public health officials define and gather systematic data on bullying to better inform research and prevention efforts. Contents include background on the problem including what is currently known about the public health burden of bullying and the need for a uniform definition of bullying, the uniform definition and description of key terms, considerations to keep in mind when gathering data on bullying, and recommended data elements.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data collection, Injury prevention, Injury surveillance systems, Research

Chatterji P, Markowitz S. 2013. Effects of bicycle helmet laws on children's injuries. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18773)

Annotation: This report examines the direct and indirect effects of state and local bicycle helmet laws on injuries among children. Using injury data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), the authors assess how helmet laws are associated with reductions in bicycle-related head injuries while also examining indirect effects such as decreases in non-head cycling injuries, as well as increases in head injuries from other wheeled sports. The report includes a detailed description of the research methodology and a discussion of the findings. The authors discuss the hypothesis that the observed reduction in bicycle-related head injuries may be due to reductions in bicycle riding induced by the laws.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Analysis, Bicycle helmets, Bicycle safety, Data, Injury surveillance systems, State legislation

Ferguson RW, Green A, Hansen LM. 2013. Game changers: Stats, stories and what communities are doing to protect young athletes. Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the nature and frequency of sports-related injuries among children and recommends things that parents, young athletes, and coaches can do to help avoid preventable sports injuries. Included are statistics on the most common diagnoses seen in emergency departments for sports related injuries; the age and gender of children most likely to experience a concussion, knee injury, overuse problem, or other sports injury; and the types of injuries most likely to occur based on the type of sport and the intensity of the child's participation. The authors also discuss public policy, state legislation related to sports injury prevention, and the ways that school boards and communities can help protect young athletes. The research is based on an analysis of data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data analysis, Injury prevention, Injury prevention surveillance systems, Policy, Sport injuries, Statistics

National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths. 2013. Child Death Review Case Reporting System: What's new in version 3.0?. Okemos, WI: National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths, 1 video (60 min.).

Annotation: The webinar describes what's new in Version 3 of the Case Reporting System (CDR) maintained by the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths. The presenters explain how the updated version will make entry of data easier for users and describes new features that the field has asked for. Moderated by Elizabeth Edgerton, Branch Chief, Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC), Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) the webinar is intended for any authorized user of the CDR Case Reporting System. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Data collection, Injury surveillance systems, Multimedia

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. 2013. A national action plan for child injury prevention: Reducing suffocation injuries in children. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines national goals and actions to further reduce suffocation-related injuries among infants and children. Examples of what can be done are organized within the following six domains: data and surveillance, research, communication, education and training, health systems and health care, and policy.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Children, Communication, Community action, Consumer education, Data, Goals, Health care systems, Infant death, Infant death review, Infants, Injuries, Injury prevention, National initiatives, Planning, Policy development, Population surveillance, Professional education, Research, Safety, Suffocation, Training

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2011. Child maltreatment: Strengthening national data on child fatalities could aid in prevention. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings from research conducted by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to determine to what extent data on the number of child fatalities from maltreatment, and the circumstances surrounding the deaths, are fully captured in the federal National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS), which is based on voluntary state reports to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Specifically, the report examines (1) the extent to which HHS collects and reports comprehensive information on child fatalities from maltreatment; (2) the challenges states face in collecting and reporting this information to HHS; and (3) the assistance HHS provides to states in collecting and reporting data on child maltreatment fatalities. The report describes the methodology used in the study; highlights from GAO's findings, including variations across counties and states (for example, differences in the definition of medical maltreatment); and recommendations to improve the comprehensiveness, quality, and use of national data on child fatalities from maltreatment,

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: , Accountability, Child death, Child maltreatment, Federal initiatives, Injury surveillance systems, National surveys, Studies

Serna P. 2011. Adolescent suicide prevention program manual: A public health model for Native American communities. Waltham, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the Adolescent Suicide Prevention Program, why the program was developed, how it was created, and how it was maintained from 1989 to 2005. Contents include information about the program's history and components. Topics include assessment; planning; capacity and staffing; building partnerships; planning for evaluation; clinical intervention; family violence prevention; school-based prevention programs; community education, awareness, and training; social services; surveillance; record-keeping and data analysis; evaluation; and sustainability.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Contact E-mail: pserna@nccbs.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family violence, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Data analysis, Data collection, Injury prevention, Intervention, Model programs, Needs assessment, Outreach, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Public health education, Public private partnerships, School health programs, Suicide prevention, Surveillance, Sustainability, Systems development

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2010. State injury indicators report. (5th ed.)—2006 data. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state-level statistical data on injury indicators and outcomes from 26 state health departments that voluntarily participated in this surveillance effort. Categories include indicators for: (1) all-injury violence (2) traumatic brain injury, (3) drowning, (4) fire-related, (5) motor vehicle, (6) poisoning, (7) firearm-related injuries (8) homicide, and (9) suicide. The indicators for each category are presented in tabular form, preceded by explanatory text. The appendix provides instructions for calculating national public health surveillance system indicators using 1999 data.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Drowning, Firearms, Homicide, Injury, Injury surveillance systems, Motor vehicle crashes, Outcome evaluation, Poisoning, Protective factors, Public health, Risk factors, State surveys, Statistics, Suicide, Violence

Borse NN, Gilchrist J, Dellinger AM, Rudd RA, Ballesteros MF, Sleet DA. 2008. CDC childhood injury report: Patterns of unintentional injuries among 0-19 year olds in the United States, 2000-2006. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 115 pp.

Annotation: This report uses data from the National Vital Statistics System and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System -- All Injury Program to provide an overview of unintentional childhood and adolescent injuries related to drowning, falls, fires or burns, transportation-related injuries, poisonings, and suffocation, among others, during the period 2000-2006. Results are presented by age group and sex. The geographic distribution of injury death by state is presented, as well.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent death, Adolescents, Age factors, Burns, Child death, Children, Drowning, Injury surveillance systems, Motor vehicle injuries, Poisoning, Racial factors, Sex factors, Suffocation, Unintentional injuries

State and Territorial Injury Prevention Directors Association, Injury Surveillance Workgroup. 2003. Consensus recommendations for using hospital discharge data for injury surveillance. Marrietta, GA: Injury Surveillance Workgroup, State Territorial Injury Prevention Directors Association, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Injury Surveillance Workgroup recommendations for standard processes for analyzing and reporting hospital discharge data by state injury prevention programs and others to facilitate comparisons of state hospital discharge rates for injury surveillance. Report sections discuss the specific limitations of hospital discharge data and make recommendations for improving data quality including data characteristics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, recommended framework for E-code groupings for presenting injury mortality and morbidity data, and standard age groups with age adjustment template using the National Center for Health Statistics age distribution no.1. Also included are references and a list of the members of the workgroup. The appendices include an assessment of state hospital discharge data systems and the Barell Injury Diagnosis Matrix.

Contact: Safe States Alliance, 2200 Century Parkway , Atlanta, GA 30341, Telephone: (770) 690-9000 Fax: (770) 690-8996 E-mail: info@safestates.org Web Site: http://www.safestates.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Health statistics, Hospital discharge data, Injury prevention, Injury surveillance systems, Research, Statistics

Bonnie RJ, Fulco CE, Liverman CT, eds. and Institute of Medicine, Committee on Injury Prevention and Control. 1999. Reducing the burden of injury: Advancing prevention and treatment. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 319 pp.

Annotation: This report, written by the Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine, emphasizes the idea that the nation's current investment in injury research is not commensurate with the magnitude of the problem. The report contains a preface, an executive summary and chapters on the following: (1) the injury field; (2) magnitude and costs; (3) surveillance and data; (4) prevention research; (5) case studies on prevention; (6) trauma care; (7) state and community response; (8) federal response; and (9) challenges and opportunities. Each chapter concludes with a list of references. There are four appendices: acknowledgments; an historical timeline of safety measures in the U.S.; (3) public meeting agenda from the committee's July 30, 1997 meeting in Washington, DC; and a list of acronyms. Statistical information is provided in chart, graph, and table format throughout the report and an index is included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $34.95, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-06566-6.

Keywords: Case studies, Costs, Data, Federal agencies, Federal programs, Injury prevention, Injury surveillance systems, Prevention, Research, Safety, State programs, Trauma care, Trends

Cassady C, Farel A, Guild P, Kennelly J, People-Sheps M, Potrzebowski P, Waller C. 1997. Maternal and child health model indicators. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Science, Education, and Analysis, 142 pp., exec. summ. (18 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Model Indicators (MI), which are to be used as a barometer of the health of mothers and children in the United States and as a guide to the content of MCH data sources in the future. The report consists of the introduction, MCH model indicators, the process of indicator development, and extensive references. Appendices include material dealing with views of MCHMI, descriptions of data sources for health status indicators, special issues regarding data on injuries, an article on rates based on small numbers, and model-based estimation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Health statistics, Health status, Injuries, Injury surveillance systems, MCH programs, Maternal and Child Health Model Indicators, Models, Statistical analysis

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 1995. Proceedings of the international collaborative effort on injury statistics, Vol. I. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, 305 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings stem from a meeting held May 18-20, 1994 which was designed to allow members of the International Collaborative Effort to improve comparability and quality of injury data. Sections address levels and trends in injury mortality and morbidity in selected participating countries, sources of injury related data and special methodological problems, current problems in producing comparable international mortality and morbidity statistics, data needs, linkage issues and coding issues.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Contact Phone: (301) 436-7039 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 95-1252.

Keywords: Australia, Canada, Clinical coding, Denmark, England, France, Injury surveillance systems, International classification of diseases, International data, Israel, Morbidity, Mortality, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Scotland, Statistical reference sources, Sweden, Switzerland, Trinidad, United States

Trauma Foundation. 1991. An advocate's guide to the cost of injury in the United States. San Francisco, CA: Trauma Foundation, 40 slides.

Annotation: This scripted presentation was adapted from a report entitled "Cost of Injury In the United States: A Report to Congress, 1989" which was prepared by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Johns Hopkins University at the request of Congress and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It provides some data on injury types and causes, with motor vehicles and firearms accounting for 50 percent. The information presented illustrates that beyond social and emotional costs, injuries have a devastating economic price. Six areas of injury are discussed: motor vehicles, firearms, falls, poisonings, drownings, and fire and burns. The guide presents information from this report in graphic form in order to provide useful tools to advocates who will explain the economic consequences of the problem of violence in the United States.

Contact: Trauma Foundation, San Francisco General Hospital, Building One, Room 300, San Francisco, CA 94110, Telephone: (415) 821-8209 Fax: (415) 821-8202 E-mail: tf@traumaaf.org Web Site: http://www.traumaf.org $95.00.

Keywords: Advocacy, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Burns, Costs, Drowning, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Injuries, Injuries--types, causes, agents, Injury prevention, Injury severity, Injury surveillance systems, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Poisons, Resources for professionals, Slides, Statistics, Tobacco, Training materials, Trauma care

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.