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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

Regan A, Kaur R, Callaghan T. 2021. Influenza and pertussis vaccination rates among pregnant women in rural and urban areas. College Station, TX: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, 10 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief evaluates the receipt of vaccines routinely recommended during pregnancy in rural and urban areas of the United States. Specifically, it analyzes the receipt of influenza and pertussis vaccines among pregnant women over a seven-year period from 2012-2018. Findings show that pregnant women in rural areas were significantly less likely than pregnant women in urban areas to receive a recommendation for influenza vaccination from their health care provider and were less likely to receive an influenza vaccine during pregnancy. Overall, the percentage of women who received a pertussis vaccine in rural areas during pregnancy was similar to the percentage of pregnant women who received one in urban areas. The policy brief also presents the implications for these findings.

Contact: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Department of Health Policy and Management, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1266, Telephone: (979) 862-4238 Fax: (979) 458-0656 Web Site: http://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/index.html

Keywords: Immunization programs, Immunizations, Influenza, Pregnant women, Rural health, Rural populations, Urban health, Urban populations, Vaccines

National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2014. Capacity of local health departments to track, administer, and promote seasonal influenza vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 8 pp.

Annotation: This research brief highlights the extent to which local health departments (LHDs) provide and have the capacity to track, administer, and promote influenza (flu) vaccination for pregnant women, children with special health care needs, and adults with disabilities. Contents include data on the percentage of LHDs providing adult and child immunizations for the period 2005-2013 and findings from key informant interviews on seasonal flu vaccination rates, administering and promoting vaccinations, and partnerships. Reimbursement issues; the emergence of retail pharmacies in the immunization market; strategies used to promote flu vaccination; and opportunities, challenges, and recommendations are also discussed.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Adults, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Health agencies, Influenza, Local government, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Public health infrastructure, Vaccines

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. United States—Mexico public health. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website provides information about public health issues that affect both Mexico and the United States. The site offers information about connections between Mexico and the United States and about health conditions of concern to both the United States and Mexico (including vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, vector-borne diseases, zoonotic diseases, illnesses spread through food and water, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, pandemic influenza and other global health emergencies, and chronic health conditions) as well as about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's role in the partnership between the United States and Mexico. Information about the U.S.-Mexico border region and other interesting facts is also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, HIV, Infectious diseases, Influenza, International health, Mexico, Prevention, Public health, Tuberculosis, Vaccines

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2013. FLU and children / youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help parents and other caregivers protect children and youth at highest risk for influenza complications. Contents include a fact sheet, a media toolkit, a web-based portal for submitting a family story, a flu vaccine finder, a letter for parents and caregivers to give to their pediatrician, and presentation slides. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Disease prevention, Families, High risk groups, Immunization, Influenza, Mass media, Spanish language materials, Special health care needs

Stratton K, Ford A, Rusch E, Wright EC, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee to Review Adverse Effects of Vaccines. 2012. The adverse effects of vaccines: Evidence and causality. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 865 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence related to adverse health events associated with specific vaccines covered by the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including the varicella zoster vaccine, influenza vaccines, the hepatits B vaccine, and the human papillomavirus vaccine, among others. For each possible adverse event, the report reviews peer-reviewed primary studies, summarizes their findings, and evaluates the epidemiological, clinical, and biological evidence. Findings on the safety of vaccines are presented.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-21435-3.

Keywords: Autism, Chicken pox, Human papillomavirus, Influenza, Hepatitis B, Research, Safety, Vaccines

KidsHealth. 2011. Avian flu. [Jacksonville, FL]: Nemours Foundation,

Annotation: This resource presents information for parents about bird flu (avian flu). Topics include what avian flu is, why and where it is a concern, how it is spread, symptoms, and how to prevent it. The content is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: KidsHealth, Nemours, 10140 Centurion Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256, Telephone: (904) 697-4100 Fax: (904) 697-4220 E-mail: comments@KidsHealth.org Web Site: http://kidshealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disease management, Disease transmission, Influenza, Prevention, Public policy, Spanish language materials, Treatment

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. 2010. Coordinating pediatric medical care during an influenza pandemic: Hospital workbook. [Oak Ridge, TN]: Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, 81 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this workbook is to assist hospitals in the process of coordinating pediatric influenza-like illness medical care across a community during an influenza pandemic. The workbook lists six areas that children's hospitals should address when coordinating medical care for pediatric influenza-like illness and provides guidance about how to address each area.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Health care, Influenza, Pediatric hospitals, Service coordination

Parent Teacher Association, National Association of School Nurses, and National Association of School Psychologists. 2009. Talking to children about swine flu (H1N1): A parent resource. Silver Spring, MD: National Association of School Nurses, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides parents with guidance on helping children avoid infection and cope with anxiety regarding the swine flu or H1N1 influenza virus. It discusses how teaching children positive prevention measures, talking about their fears, and giving them some sense of control over their risk of infection can help reduce anxiety. Guidance on keeping explanations age appropriate, how and when to communicate with the school, and national organization and federal agency web sites are included. The brief is available in English and Spanish. An audio version is also available at http://www.nasponline.org/resources/podcasts/TalkingtoChildren_SwineFlu.mp3.

Contact: National Association of School Nurses, 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 925, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 821-1130 Secondary Telephone: (866) 627-6767 Fax: (301) 585-1791 E-mail: nasn@nasn.org Web Site: http://www.nasn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Disease prevention, Influenza, School age children, Spanish language materials, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2009. The role of state MCH programs in H1N1 response. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief summarizes state MCH program involvement with H1N1 response and suggests role that the program can continue to play in preparedness and response efforts throughout the year. Topics include examples of state MCH program responses and lessons learned from the previous outbreak. Selected resources are provided for general flu information, pregnant women, infants, children, and children and youth with special health care needs. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Health planning, Infants, Influenza, MCH services, Pregnant women, Special health care needs, State MCH programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American Academy of Pediatrics. 2009. 2009-2010 influenza season triage algorithm for children ([equal to or under] 18 years) with influenza-like illness. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This algorithm, which was developed for physicians and those under their direct supervision, offers information to help in providing advice to parents or other caregivers of ill children about seeking medical care for influenza-like illnesses. The algorithm provides information about what type of treatment should be sought based on the child's age, symptoms, and risk factors.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Infant heath, Infants with special health care needs, Influenza

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health. 2009. Prevention of 2009 H1N1 influenza transmission in dental health care settings. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health,

Annotation: This fact sheet provides guidelines in preventing the transmission of H1N1 influenza in oral health care settings. Topics include how the virus is transmitted, symptoms of influenza and H1N1, how to control transmission of influenza viruses, and recommendations for the oral health care environment and personnel.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Influenza, Oral health

Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition. 2008. Improving childhood influenza immunization rates to protect our nation's children. [New York, NY]: Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information from a meeting of public health, medical, patient, and parent organizations interested in reducing the burden of influenza in children by increasing immunization rates. The meeting was held on May 23, 2007, in Washington, DC. Participants discussed the importance of protecting children from influenza and outlined ways to help health professionals administer vaccines to more infants, children, adolescents, and their close contacts annually. The report discusses the impact of influenza on children, approaches to increase immunization rates, and additional benefits to society of vaccinating children against influenza.

Contact: Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition, 139 Fifth Avenue, Floor 3, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 866-2277 E-mail: CIIC@nfid.org Web Site: http://www.preventchildhoodinfluenza.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Immunization, Infant health, Influenza, Prevention

Trust for America's Health and American Academy of Pediatrics. 2007. Pandemic influenza: Warning, children at risk. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 31 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief examines strategic approaches for containing the spread of a pandemic in children and adolescents. The brief includes the following parts: (1) introduction, background, and overview; (2) strategies to limit social interaction among children to contain the spread of an influenza pandemic; (3) medical interventions to limit the spread of a pandemic in children; (4) diagnostics; and (5) policy recommendations. The brief includes two appendices: (1) a primer on influenza viruses and (2) glossary of terms and acronyms. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents health, Child health, Influenza, Intervention, Prevention, Public policy

Alabama Department of Public Health. [2006]. In case of emergency, are you ready?. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information that can help families create an emergency preparedness plan that will enable them to respond more quickly and efficiently during an emergency. Topics include evacuation and sheltering, special populations, important documents, supply kits, checklists, disease prevention and control, pandemic influenza, natural disasters, hazardous materials, injury prevention, food and water safety, coping with disasters, emergency preparedness teams, additional resources, and personal emergency phone contacts.

Contact: Alabama Department of Public Health, RSA Tower, 201 Monroe Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 206-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) ALA-1818 Fax: Web Site: http://www.adph.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Consumer education materials, Disasters, Disease prevention, Emergencies, Families, Food safety, Hazardous materials, Influenza, Water safety

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. 2003. Increasing influenza immunization rates in infants and children: Putting recommendations into practice—Strategies to help pediatric and family practices implement immunization recommendations. Bethesda, MD: National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 24 pp.

Annotation: This consensus report, which focuses on influenza vaccination, presents strategies that have been shown to increase immunization rates and suggests ways to implement them in a variety of pediatric practices. The report is divided into two main parts. Part I discusses the importance of influenza vaccination in healthy and high-risk children, and Part II presents models for increasing pediatric vaccination rates. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a reference list.

Contact: National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 4733 Bethesda Avenue, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 656-0003 Fax: (301) 907-0878 E-mail: info@nfid.org Web Site: http://www.nfid.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Immunization, Infants, Influenza, Pediatric care, Risk factors

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2002. Preparedness planning for state health officials: Nature's terrorist attack pandemic influenza. Washington, DC: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the challenges involved in planning and responding to pandemic influenza. The report, which includes an executive summary, also includes a state health official checklist to help health officials determine whether their states are ready for pandemic influenza. Also discussed are sources of authority, policies and protocols, surge capacity, and risk communications. References and a conclusion are included. The report includes one appendix, which contains a list of resources.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Disaster planning, Disease, Influenza, Protocols, Public policy, State health agencies

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, . 1970. Influenza-respiratory disease surveillance . Atlanta, GA: Center for Disease Control , 22 pp. (Report No. 86)

Annotation: This surveillance report summarizes the occurrence and spread of influenza in the United States for the 1969-1970 season. Included are statistics on cases of influenza/upper respiratory illnesses and pneumonia and influenza mortality rates from reporting states. A supplementary report on the Hong Kong influenza outbreak in Anchorage, Alaska in a church-supported residence for children is also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Minority Health and Health Equity, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/minorityhealth/OMHHE.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Influenza, Population surveillance, Respiratory diseases, Statistics, Surveys

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.