Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (55 total).

Rubinstein R. n.d.. The Pediatric Prevention of the New Morbidity [Final report]. , 58 pp.

Annotation: This project had two major goals. (1) The project was to consider the various models for identifying psychosocial and developmental problems and develop broad recommendations for future research directions. In addition to this critical review of the literature bearing on the new morbidity and its prevention, the project was charged with (2) considering some of the methodological issues that would need to be confronted in an evaluation of the Health Supervision Package designed by the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Committee on the Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196814.

Keywords: Infant health, Morbidity, Pediatricians, Prevention, Psychosocial disorders

Ronan L. n.d.. A Demonstration Model of Risk-Appropriate Prenatal Care System to Reduce the Incidence of Low Birthweight in Maine [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Medical Care Development, Inc. , 52 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce infant morbidity and mortality due to low birthweight, and to demonstrate a cost-effective prenatal care program which was integrated into the existing system and can be duplicated in other states. Project objectives included: reducing the incidence of low birthweight newborns in the project; reducing the incidence of women who engage in high-risk behaviors during their pregnancy; instituting a model prenatal education, counseling, referral, and followup program in physicians' offices and other sites; and enhancing the education and counseling skills of prenatal care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103258.

Keywords: Counseling, Education of Health Professionals, Education of Patients, High risk pregnancy, Infant Morbidity, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Referrals

Radley DC, McCarthy D, Hayes SL. 2017. Aiming higher: Results from the Commonwealth Fund scorecard on state health system performance–2017 edition. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, annual.

Annotation: This report ranks states on more than 40 indicators of health system performance in five broad areas: health care access, quality, avoidable hospital use and costs, health outcomes, and health care equity. It also compares and evaluates trends across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adults, Children, Dental care, Equal opportunities, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, Infants, Measures, Morbidity, Mortality, Obesity, Oral health, Preventive health services, Smoking, State initiatives, Statistics, Systems development, Trends

University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program. [2011]. Model health and safety policies: Safe sleep policy for infants in child care programs. San Francisco, CA: University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, 1 p.

Annotation: This document provides safe sleep guidelines for infants in child care programs. The document lists steps that programs can take to reduce the risk for sudden infant death syndrome, sudden unexpected infant death, and the spreading of contagious disease. Steps cover sleep environment, pacifier use, smoking, breastfeeding, and tummy time.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, California Childcare Health Program, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-4695 Web Site: http://www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Child care centers, Guidelines, Infant death, Infant health, Infant morbidity, SIDS, Prevention, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking

Main E, Oshiro B, Chagolla B, Bingham D, Dang-Kilduff L, Kowalewski L. 2011. Elimination of non-medically indicated (elective) deliveries before 39 weeks gestational age: A California toolkit to transform maternity care [rev. ed]. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, 130 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which incorporates policies and tools used at U.S. hospitals, outlines best practices and provides support materials and guidance for implementing a quality-improvement project focused on reducing elective deliveries before 39 weeks' gestation. The toolkit also provides methods to identify improvement opportunities and outlines techniques for measuring process and outcome improvements. Topics include the importance of eliminating deliveries before 39 weeks, implementation, data collection and quality improvement, and clinician and patient education.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Child morbidity, Childbirth, Education, Guidelines, Infant morbidity, Maternal morbidity, Outcome evaluation, Perinatal morbidity, Prevention, Process evaluation, Programs, Resource materials, Trends

Hallsworth M, Farrands A, Oortwijn WJ, Hatziandreu E. 2008. The provision of neonatal services: Data for international comparisons. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 157 pp. (Technical report)

Annotation: This report presents a comparative analysis of neonatal services, followed by chapters on specific countries (Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, the United States, Canada, Sweden, and Australia). The information is divided into five categories: (1) trend in high-risk births and associated outcomes, (2) organization and scale of neonatal services, (3) neonatal transport services, (4) costs of neonatal services, and (5) best practices for infants and their families. The main purpose of the report is to provide a compendium of relevant data to facilitate comparisons and benchmarking of neonatal services in England with those of these other countries. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. References are included. The report includes two appendices: (1) methodology and (2) list of search terms used for literature review.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Families, Health care services, Infant health, International health, Low birthweight infants, Neonatal intensive care, Neonatal morbidity, Neonatal mortality, Trends

Save the Children. 2007. State of the world's mothers 2007: Saving the lives of children under 5. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 62 pp.

Annotation: This annual report shows which countries are succeeding or failing to save the lives of mothers and children up to age five. It examines how investments in health care and nutrition can make a difference for children, mothers, communities, and society as a whole. It also points to proven, low-cost solutions that could save the majority of these young lives. Contents include a summary of key findings and recommendations, reducing the child death toll, child survival progress ranking, low-cost solutions to saving children under age five, a report card on five ways to save lives under age five, changing the world by investing in children, child deaths in the industrialized world and the U.S. ranking, and recommendations on actions to improve the health and mortality of women and children around the world. The appendix includes the index and country rankings. The report concludes with the survey methodology.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-888393-19-X.

Keywords: Children, Developing countries, Health care, Infant death, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, International health, Mothers, Newborn infants, Nutrition, Prenatal care, Statistical data, Women's health

Save the Children. 2006. State of the world's mothers 2006: Saving the lives of mothers and newborns. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 50 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the successes and failures of various countries in saving the lives of mothers and their newborn infants. The report examines the ways that investments in health care, nutrition, education, and communication can make a difference for newborns, mothers, communities, and society. The report also suggests solutions that could save infants' lives. The report includes key findings and recommendations and discusses why newborns die, the costs to society of newborn death and disease, the link between mothers and newborns, the relationship between poverty and the death of mothers and newborns, the continuum of care for mothers and newborns, countries' investments in saving newborns' lives, the building blocks of newborn survival, and how countries rank in terms of newborn survival, and newborn mortality in the industrialized world. The report also includes an index that presents detailed statistical information on the status of mothers and children in a variety of countries. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-888393-18-1.

Keywords: Children, Communication, Communities, Developing countries, Education, Health care, Infant death, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, International health, Mothers, Newborn infants, Nutrition, Poverty, Prenatal care, Women's health

Garner C. 2005. Twin Cities Healthy Start Initiative [impact report]. Minneapolis, MN: Twin Cities Healthy Start Initiative, 28 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a Healthy Start project from 2001 to 2005 to reduce the disparities in infant morbidity and mortality among the Minneapolis and St. Paul African American and American Indian communities. Report contents include an overview of racial and ethnic disparity focused on by the project; and descriptions of project implementation, management and governance, project accomplishments, and project impact. Additional contents include the local evaluation and project data (on diskettes). Attachments include the project implementation plan in chart format, sample project brochures, a pregnancy journal for pregnant women and tip sheets for health professionals to use with the journal, articles published about the program and an orientation manual for project staff. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: American Indians, Blacks, Consumer education materials, Ethnic factors, Final reports, Healthy Start, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, MCH services, Minnesota, Prevention programs, Racial factors

[Pettiford B]. [2004]. North Carolina Triad Baby Love Plus: Healthy Start impact report. Raleigh, NC: Women's and Children's Health Section, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, 72 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a Healthy Start project in North Carolina from 2001-2004 to improve perinatal health disparities by reducing infant morbidity and mortality. The report describes interventions including local and regional consortium development, improved access to care by providing transportation, outreach to women of childbearing age, enhanced clinical services, case management, health education and training, and community planning to develop strategies necessary to address community issues in infant mortality. Contents also discuss the project implementation, management and governance, accomplishments, and impact. A copy of the local evaluation is provided, along with a list of products and data from the project. Appendices include an organizational chart, various reports, charts, forms, logs, consumer surveys, a draft curriculum for health and human services agencies for cultural diversity training, a resource guide for pastors and ministers, and other brochures and booklets provided to pregnant women and new mothers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Final reports, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, MCH research, North Carolina, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Racial factors, Underserved populations

[Ruffin J]. [2003]. Northeastern North Carolina Baby Love Plus: Healthy Start impact report. Raleigh, NC: Women's and Children's Health Section, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, 74 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a Healthy Start program in Northeastern North Carolina from 2000-2003 to improve perinatal health disparities by reducing infant morbidity and mortality by enhancing the effectiveness of existing services and introducing new interventions that complement the existing services. Report contents include an overview of the racial and ethnic disparities focused on by the project, descriptions of the project implementation, management and governance, accomplishments, and impact. Also included is a copy of the local evaluation, along with a list of products and data from the project. Appendices include a request for subcontractor applications, various forms, customer surveys, guides, an action plan chart, and brochures and booklets for pregnant women and new mothers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Final reports, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, MCH research, North Carolina, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Racial factors, Underserved populations

Owens PL, Thompson J, Elixhauser A, Ryan K. 2003. Care of children and adolescents in U.S. hospitals. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 52 pp. (Healthcare cost and utilization project fact book; no. 4)

Annotation: This fact book presents an overview of children and adolescents in U.S. hospitals, providing insight into the types of conditions for which they are hospitalized, the types of procedures they receive, who is billed for the stays, the resources associated with their hospital stays, and where they are discharged to when they leave the hospital. The fact book begins with an overview of hospital care for children and adolescents overall and compares information about children and adolescents to information about adults. It then provides more detailed information about three major subgroups of pediatric hospital stays: (1) neonatal stays, (2) stays for other pediatric illness, and (3) stays for adolescent pregnancy and delivery. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the fact book.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58763-137-7.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child health: Adolescent health, Children, Costs, Hospitalization, Hospitals, Infant health, Infants, Neonatal intensive care, Neonatal morbidity

University of Colorado, Department of Family Medicine, Research and Evaluation Group, and Interconception Health Promotion Initiative. 2003. Interconception Health Promotion Initiative: Final report. Denver, CO: Colorado Trust, 176 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes the activities of the Interconception Health Promotion Initiative, a demonstration project the objective of which was to develop a home-based case-management program for women who had a low-birthweight infant, a fetal demise, or an infant with congenital abnormalities, and who planned on having more children, with the goal of improving outcomes of future pregnancies. The report provides a summary of the program, describes the problem being addressed, discusses the program in detail, and provides results. A conclusion and a discussion are also included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. Six appendices include eligibility criteria, a bibliography and references, sample surveys, tabled data, and an examination of the quality of birth certificate data.

Contact: Colorado Trust, 1600 Sherman Street, Denver, CO 80203-1604, Telephone: (303) 837-1200 Secondary Telephone: (888) 847-9140 Fax: (303) 839-9034 E-mail: questions@coloradotrust.org Web Site: http://www.coloradotrust.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Congenital abnormalities, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, Initiatives, Low birthweight, Pregnancy outcome, Reproductive health, Women's health

Hovell M. 2001. ETS and Smoking Control in Families: A WIC Trial: [Final report]. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, 40 pp.

Annotation: This study tested a behavioral counseling intervention designed to reduce environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure among babies under age 1. Specific aims were to (1) determine the effects of clinic-based behavioral counseling on ETS exposure among babies of low socioeconomic status (SES), as measured by mothers' reports and babies' urine cotinine analyses; (2) validate parent-reported ETS exposure measures using urine cotinine assays and environmental nicotine monitors; (3) determine the effects of participation on the mothers' smoking rate and the proportion of mothers who quit smoking; (4) explore health outcome measures associated with decreased ETS exposure; and (5) identify possible determinants of ETS exposure. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-101955.

Keywords: Counseling, Family Environment, Hispanics, Hispanics, Infant Morbidity, Infants, Infants, MCH Research, Research, Smoking During Pregnancy

Lieu T. 2001. "BABE: The Birth and Beyond Experiences Study" Home Versus Group Visits After Early Postpartum Discharge: [Final report]. Oakland, CA: Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, 30 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that low-risk mothers and newborns will be at reduced risk of adverse health outcome if assigned to receive a home visit rather than a group clinic visit on the third postpartum day. Low-risk mothers and newborns were identified prior to hospital discharge. These study subjects were enrolled, interviewed, and randomized to a home visit (intervention) or a group clinic visit (usual care) on the third postpartum day. Outcome data were obtained from telephone interviews with mothers from computerized utilization databases at Kaiser Permanente. An adverse health outcome was defined as any of the following during the first 14 postpartum days: an urgent clinic visit by the newborn or mother, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or rehospitalization of the newborn and/or the mother. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-101952.

Keywords: Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Infant Health Care, Infant Morbidity, Infants, Infants, MCH Research, Neonates, Newborn infants, Perinatal Health, Postpartum Women, Postpartum Women, Research, Standards of Care

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2000. Health disparities: Bridging the gap. Rockville, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 43 pp. (From cells to selves)

Annotation: This report discusses the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (NICHD's) efforts to bridge the health disparities gap. The report discusses NICHD's health disparities plan as well as NICHD's unique perspectives in health disparities for the following areas: infant and maternal mortality and morbidity; reproductive health; HIV/AIDS -- targeting women and teens; early antecedents of disparities in disease and growth; early antecedents of child well-being and adverse behaviors; school readiness; cognitive and behavioral development; restoring function and preventing disability; training and career development; and outreach to communities and their institutions. For each area, the report presents facts, information on current outreach, and future goals/objectives. The report includes a roster of advisors.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Careers, Child behavior, Child development, Child health, Cognitive development, Communities, Early childhood development, Early intervention, HIV infection, Infant health, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, Maternal health, Maternal morbidity, Maternal mortality, Minority groups, Outreach, Reproductive health, School readiness, Training

National Center for Health Statistics. 1999. Maternal and child health statistics: Russian Federation and the United States, selected years—1985-95. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 140 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 5, International vital and health statistics reports; no. 10)

Annotation: This report focuses on maternal and child health statistics for the Russian Federation and the United States. The report covers a broad range of health measures including the following: prenatal care, pregnancy complications, abortion, method of delivery, birth order, births to unmarried women, births by age of mother, infant mortality, maternal mortality, child mortality by age group, immunizations, morbidity in the Russian Federation, hospitalization in the United States, and communicable diseases. The report also includes a discussion of data quality issues to assist in understanding limitations in the accuracy, coverage, or comparability of the information presented. A background section provides a brief description of the organization of each country's health care system, as well as an outline of national guidelines for the provision of maternal and child health care. The report also contains 24 tables covering population size, prenatal and obstetrical care, abortions, natality data, breastfeeding practices, mortality data including causes of death, immunization rates, communicable diseases, and other morbidity measures. The report provides additional detail, when available, for key subgroups of each population: In the Russian Federation, data are presented for urban and rural regions; in the United States, for black and white racial groups. In the final section of the report, a glossary of terms provides additional detail on differences in definitions between the two countries.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: PHS 99-1486.

Keywords: Abortion, Child health, Child health services, Child mortality, Childbirth, Communicable diseases, Health statistics, Hospitalization, Immunization programs, Infant health services, Infant mortality, Maternal age, Maternal health, Maternal health services, Maternal mortality, Morbidity, Pregnancy complications, Premarital pregnancy, Prenatal care, Racial factors, Rural population, Russia, United States, Urban population, Vital statistics

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1999. The top ten public health achievements in the 20th century. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 items.

Annotation: This resource features a series of reports published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports between April and December 1999 on 10 public health achievements, reflecting the successful response of public health to the major causes of morbidity and mortality for the period 1900-1999. Topics include vaccination, motor-vehicle safety, workplace safety, control of infectious diseases, decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke, safer and healthier foods, healthier mothers and babies, family planning, fluoridation of drinking water, and tobacco as a health hazard. Critical changes in the U.S. public health system during the century are also addressed.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Cardiovascular diseases, Children, Families, Family planning, Fluorides, Food safety, Health policy, History, Infant health, Infection control, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Public health, Strokes, Systems development, Tobacco use, Vaccination effects, Water

Singer L. 1998. Psychological Sequelae of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and Very Low Birthweight: [Final report]. Cleveland, OH: Case Western Reserve University, 32 pp.

Annotation: This study was a longitudinal, prospective investigation of the medical, social, and developmental correlates of chronic lung disease during the first 2 years of life. Data was evaluated descriptively as well as through a series of multivariate analyses of variance with repeated measures to describe the functioning of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and to understand the developmental interferences imposed by BPD early in life. The research provided practical information about family and developmental stresses related to lung disease that might be amenable to intervention early in life and also contribute to our theoretical understanding of the role of chronic illness in child development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-109373.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Early Childhood Development, Infant Morbidity, Low Birthweight, MCH Research, Pulmonary Disease, Research

Schuch A. 1997. Increasing the utilization of certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in the South. Washington, DC: Southern Regional Project on Infant Mortality, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report results from a two-year study on the use of certified nurse practitioners, nurse-midwives, and physician assistants in the southern states and territories in order to provide the mostly rural populations with better access to health care. The report aims to educate southern policymakers about the benefits of using these practitioners, to document barriers to their practicing, and to assist these states and territories in improving the legal and regulatory environment for their practice. The report reviews research on the quality of care; and cost-effectiveness of care delivered by these practitioners; describes site visits in Louisiana, Georgia, and Florida; and makes recommendations.

Keywords: Childbirth, Cost effectiveness, Florida, Georgia, Infant morbidity, Infant mortality, Louisiana, Nurse midwives, Nurse practitioners, Patient satisfaction, Physician assistants, Quality assurance, Southern United States, Statistics, Treatment outcome

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.