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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (170 total).

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control. n.d.. Parents of earth, are your children fully immunized? = Immunization: Star Wars. Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control, 1 p.

Annotation: This poster shows two Star Wars characters in a futuristic setting. The legend reads: "Parents of earth, are your children fully immunized? Make sure - Call your doctor or health department today. And may the force be with you."

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Immunization, Posters

Professional Research. n.d.. Immunizations: What Lily learned. Evanston, IL: Altschul Group Corporation, 1 videotape (VHS).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Prevention Services. n.d.. We can think of nine good reasons to immunize on time, but you only need one = Immunize on time, your baby's counting on you. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Prevention Services, 1 poster.

Annotation: This poster of a baby lists nine diseases that are prevented by childhood immunizations, and advises the viewer to have babies fully immunized by age two.

Keywords: Immunization, Posters

Hanes D. n.d.. Alabama Day Care Health and Safety Program: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this demonstration project was to develop and implement a comprehensive health and safety curriculum in child day care settings to improve the health status of children. A comprehensive educational program was developed and presented in the day care setting with a positive parenting component, a children's component, and a day care worker component. This educational curriculum demonstrated positive changes in child health indicators, day care environment, and safety, and increased knowledge of child development, health, and safety issues on the part of parents and day care workers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-182811.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child Care, Child safety, Health Education, Immunization, Parents, Preschoolers, Rural Populations, Urban Populations

Colegrove J. n.d.. Child Care Health Promotion Project: [Final report]. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to address the health needs of children in child care centers in the New Mexico counties of Rio Arriba and McKinley. Topics include parent and child care provider training in the areas of nutrition, oral health, physical fitness, mental health, and communicable disease prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198919.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child Care, Dental Caries, Early childhood caries, Health Promotion, Immunization, Oral Health, Preschoolers, Rural Populations

Partnership for Male Youth. n.d.. The Partnership for Male Youth: Health provider toolkit for adolescent and young adult males. Washington, DC: Partnership for Male Youth, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help health professionals address the unique health care needs of adolescents and young adult males (AYAs) ages 10 to 26. Contents include a checklist covering nine health domains; client interview questions and supporting materials for each domain including background information, practice tools, and references; and a video library containing presentations for continuing medical education and client education. Topics include healthy eating and physical activity, sexual and reproductive health, trauma, mental health, developmental disorders, sexual biologic basics, normal pubertal concerns and genital abnormalities, and labs and immunizations. A tutorial is also available.

Contact: Partnership for Male Youth, 900 Second Street, N.E., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20002, E-mail: barbour@partnershipformaleyouth.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipformaleyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Comprehensive health care, Continuing medical education, Evidence based health care, Health examinations, Immunizations, Interviews, Medical history taking, Men's health, Screening, Young adults

American Academy of Pediatrics and Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice. n.d.. AAP Child Health Mapping Project. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource provides a geographic representation of child health in the United States. Contents include national and state-specific data on pediatric health care delivery at the Primary Care Service Area level. A range of maps is available including the number of children under age 18 per pediatrician, the number of children in linguistically-isolated households, median household income, the number of pediatric residents and fellows, and estimated vaccine coverage rates. An interactive mapping tool is available to members of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Data sources, Geographic regions, Health care disparities, Immunization, Integrated information systems, Interactive media, Language barriers, Low income groups, Patient care planning, Pediatricians, Statewide planning, Work force

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Infectious Diseases. 2015. Red book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, triennial.

Annotation: This book contains guidelines developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics for the management and prevention of infectious diseases in children. The book focuses on active and passive immunization; guidelines for care of children in special circumstances including breastfeeding, out-of-home child care, hospitalized children, and internationally adopted children; over 100 infectious diseases; and antimicrobial therapies. These recommendations were derived from consensus among representatives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health, the National Vaccine Programs, and the Canadian Paediatric Society. Updated editions are available online for a subscription fee.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Child health, Communicable diseases, Guidelines, Immunization, Infant health

Shelov SP, Altmann TR, Hannermann RE. 2014. Caring for your baby and young child: Birth to age 5. (6th ed.). New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1 v.

Annotation: This book is a guide to basic infant and child care from birth to age five for parents and caregivers. It is divided into two parts; the first part focuses on the child's development and on the milestones of infancy and early childhood. Part one begins with preparing for a new baby and follows through with delivery, basic care, and feeding; subsequent chapters are devoted to specific age periods. Each of these considers growth and development, basic care, behavior, and safety; several of them also cover immunizations. The second part describes various emergencies, illnesses, and disorders including behavior problems of infancy and early childhood. This part tells parents what to expect, discusses home therapies, and indicates when to call a pediatrician.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.67, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Behavior, Child care, Child development, Child health, Childbirth, Children, Developmental stages, Emergencies, First aid, Immunization, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Parenting

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014. Recommended immunization schedules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: The schedules posted on this web page indicate the recommended ages for routine administration of currently licensed vaccines, as of February 1, 2012, for children. Any dose not administered at the recommended age should be administered at a subsequent visit, when indicated and feasible. Schedules for appropriate vaccination administration include: hepatitis; influenza; measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); pneumococcal, as well as by age: persons aged 0-6 years, persons aged 7-18 years, and ages 4 months-18 years who start late or who are more than 1 month behind.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Immunizations

Schachter A, Sabharwal R, Rein S. 2014. Spotlight on kids: Beacon community efforts to improve pediatric prevention, care, and outcomes. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief provides examples of how health information technology (IT)-enabled strategies, partnerships, and tools have been used to improve health care quality and outcomes for children, adolescents, families, and communities. The brief describes community-based strategies aimed at improving pediatric immunization rates, asthma management, public health surveillance, and health promotion and education. The efforts make use of tools and functions such as health information exchange, school portals for shared care plans, immunization and asthma registries, and mobile health programs. The brief concludes with a discussion of policy implications.

Keywords: Adolescents, Asthma, Children, Communities, Families, Health promotion, Health status, Immunization, Mobile health units, Policy development, Population surveillance, Program improvement, Registries, Schools, Technology

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2014. The HPV vaccine: Access and use in the U.S.. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 5 pp.

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2014. Missed opportunities to prevent cervical cancer: Strategies to increase HPV vaccination. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 3 pp. (Fact sheet: Women, children and adolescents)

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. The guide to clinical preventive services: Recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 123 pp.

Annotation: This document is a compilation of abridged U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations released from 2004 to March 2014 and can be used as an evidence-based tool at the point of client care. Contents include clinical summaries of recommendations for children, adolescents, and adults including immunizations for children and adults and topics in progress. The guide also lists resources that clinicians can use to educate clients on appropriate preventive services and provides brief descriptions of and links to tools that health care professionals can use to improve their practice.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 14-05158; ISBN 978-1-58763-439-0.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Evidence based medicine, Immunization, Patient care, Preventive health services

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2014. Preventive services covered by private health plans under the Affordable Care Act. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines the provision of the Affordable Care Act that requires private insurance plans to cover recommended preventive services without client cost-sharing. Topics include cost barriers to use of preventive services for women and men; categories of clinical preventive services including evidence-based screenings and counseling, immunizations, and other preventive services for children, youth, and women; coverage rules and implementation challenges; and impact of the preventive services rule. Tables summarize selected preventive services for adults and children covered by non-grandfathered private plans without cost-sharing.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Barriers, Children, Costs, Counseling, Financing, Health care reform, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Immunization, Men, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Private sector, Regulations, Screening, Women, Young adults

Laudenbach JM, Frediani R. 2014. Human papillomavirus vaccination for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States: A cost-benefit analysis. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes the potential relationship between the benefits of human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization and the costs of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Contents include information about oral HPV infection and HPV vaccination; an economic cost-benefit analysis; and conclusions.

Contact: Center for Oral Health, 309 East Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766-1854, Telephone: (909) 469-8300 Fax: (510) 380-6637 E-mail: info@tc4oh.org Web Site: http://www.centerfororalhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Economics, Human papillomavirus, Immunization, Oral health, Policy development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Vaccination effects, Vaccines

Washington State Department of Health. 2013. Plain talk about childhood immunization (7th ed.). [Olympia, WA]: Washington State Department of Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for parents provides information about immunizations and the diseases they prevent,balances the benefits and risks of immunization to help parents make informed decisions, and discusses the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. Topics include information about the decline in vaccine-preventable diseases since childhood vaccination began, facts about vaccine-preventable diseases, how vaccines work, vaccine safety, specific vaccinations, legal requirements, decisions about when to vaccinate, vaccinating adolescents, evaluating information on the Internet, and personal stories.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Consumer education materials, Immunization, Infant health, Legislation, Safety, Vaccination effects, Vaccines

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. HPV vaccine for preteens and teens. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents information about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for male and female adolescents and young adults (ages 11-26). It explains when and how many shots are recommended, discusses what HPV is, and provides links to related information and resources.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Human papillomavirus, Disease prevention, Immunization, Sexually transmitted diseases, Young adults

Institute of Medicine, Committee on the Assessment of Studies of Health Outcomes Related to the Recommended Childhood Immunization Schedule. 2013. The childhood immunization schedule and safety: Stakeholder concerns, scientific evidence, and future studies. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 219 pp., brief (3 pp.).

Annotation: This report identifies feasible study designs to explore the safety of the U.S. childhood immunization schedule. The report summarizes findings of a committee of experts in pediatrics, neurology, medical ethics, immunology, statistics, epidemiology, and public health convened by the Institute of Medicine. Contents include background on how vaccines are developed and recommended for children in the United States; existing surveillance and data systems for evaluating vaccine safety; stakeholder concerns; methods used to perform a literature review on the scientific findings of studies of selected health outcomes and the recommended immunization schedule, as well as the literature review's results; methodological approaches for future studies; and a summary of the committee's findings, conclusions, and recommendations.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-26702-1.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Immunization, Safety, Vaccines

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. Text4baby: What's new to support maternal and child health?. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (61 min.).

Annotation: This webinar describes the Text4baby program, the text messaging service for pregnant and new parents begun in 2010, primarily aimed to low-income, underserved populations. The service is subscribed to with the due-date or birth-date, and evidence-based developmental and time-appropriate advice is sent at varying intervals until the infant is age one. The service is available in English or Spanish. Messages include topics such as prenatal care tips, health and safety advisory information, father involvement, flu vaccination, oral health for mother and baby, Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program information, appointment reminder services, breastfeeding, safe sleep for infants, and more. Tje webinar provides dditional information on studies on user satisfaction, audiences reached, and changes in knowledge and behavior of pregnant women and new parents.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the web site.

Keywords: Communication, Immunization, Infant care, Low income groups, MCH programs, National programs, Parents, Postnatal care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Well child care

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.