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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (101 total).

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development. 2017. Resource guide: Building a bright future for all–Success in early learning programs and elementary school for immigrant families. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, 55 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist state and local efforts to support immigrant children from birth through the elementary grades and promote educational equity and opportunity for all children. Contents include a glossary and background; legal guidelines; tips for early learning programs, elementary schools, and educators; and information about education and supportive service programs and resources. The second section of the guide is a handbook for parents on topics such as why quality early learning matters, tips on immunizations, information about civil rights and program eligibility, tips for addressing barriers, and opportunities for parents and guardians.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Washington, DC Telephone: (202) 401-0831 Secondary Telephone: (202) 401-7888 E-mail: opepd.ppss@ed.gov Web Site: https://ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Civil rights, Early childhood education, Elementary education, Elementary schools, Eligibility, Equal opportunities, Guardianship, Immigrants, Learning, Legal issues, Parents, Spanish language materials

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Immigration detention: Additional actions needed to strengthen management and oversight of detainees in medical care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the provision and oversight of medical care, including care for women and children, in immigration detention facilities including care. Topics include the extent to which the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has processes for administering detainee medical care and maintaining cost information for care, monitors and assesses compliance with medical care standards, and oversees processes to obtain and address complaints about detainee medical care.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Compliance, Costs, Immigrants, Medical assistance, Residential facilities, Standards, Women

Massachusetts Act Early. 2016. Considering culture in autism screening. [no place]: Massachusetts Act Early, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document for primary care health professionals provides tips for promoting the identification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and other developmental disabilities for children from immigrant families or from families whose primary language is not English. Contents include tips for culturally- and linguistically-competent autism screening; the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) screening tool in English and in four translations (Chinese, Haitian Creole, Spanish, and Vietnamese); an assortment of materials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Learn the Signs. Act Early campaign for use in practice; and resource and referral information.

Contact: Massachusetts Act Early, MA Web Site: www.maactearly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Culturally competent services, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early identification, Immigrants, Infants, Massachusetts, Non English language materials, Public awareness campaign materials, Referrals, State initiatives, Young children

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and Family Voices. 2016. Stories of the newly enrolled: How new ACA coverage options are impacting women and families raising children with special health care needs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents five case studies of women, young adults, and families, including those raising children and youth with special health care needs (CYSCHN), about enrolling in and receiving care through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) health insurance coverage. The contents illustrate some of the benefits of the ACA's new coverage options for women and families with CYSCHN and challenges that remain in closing gaps in care and ensuring appropriate coverage for vulnerable populations. Topics include ACA provider networks, autism treatment coverage; and coverage for Native Americans; immigrant and refugee women, and young adult women. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Family centered care, Financing, Health care reform, Health insurance, Immigrants, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Program improvement, Refugees, Women, Young adults

Catalyst Center. 2014. Immigrant children with special health care needs and the Affordable Care Act. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) may affect children and adolescents with special health care needs (CSHCN) who are foreign-born, live with at least one parent who is foreign-born, or have family members with different immigration or documentation statuses. It also describes ACA provisions that may reduce health coverage inequities and barriers to coverage among CSHCN in immigrant families. Topics include simplified eligibility rules for parents and caretaker relatives, pregnant women, and children; optional adult Medicaid expansion; marketplaces; navigators; and pre-existing conditions. A table outlining the impact of the ACA provisions on CSHCN in immigrant families and coverage gaps is included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Children, Children's Health Insurance Program, Families, Financing, Health care reform, Immigrants, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Special health care needs

Brindis CD, Hadler MW, Jacobs K, Lucia L, Pourat N, Raymond-Flesch M, Siemons R, Talamantes E. 2014. Realizing the dream for Californians eligible for deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA): Health needs and access to health care. Berkeley, CA: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education; Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; San Francisco, CA: UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the health needs, common sources of care, and barriers to care foradolescents and young adults in California who are eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides temporary work authorization and relief from deportation for qualified undocumented immigrants. The report examines health care use and identifies barriers to care experienced by this group. A companion report describes the health care coverage of DACA-eligible populations in Californians and presents potential policy solutions to expand their coverage options.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, California, Eligibility, Health care utilization, State programs, Undocumented immigrants, Young adults

Brindis CD, Hadler MW, Jacobs K, Lucia L, Pourat N, Raymond-Flesch M, Siemons R, Talamantes E. 2014. Realizing the dream for Californians eligible for deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA): Demographics and health coverage. Berkeley, CA: UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education; Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research; San Francisco, CA: UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the health care coverage of adolescents and young adults in California who are eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides temporary work authorization and relief from deportation for qualified undocumented immigrants. The report also presents potential policy solutions to expand their coverage options. A companion report discusses the health needs, common sources of care, and barriers to care for DACA-eligible Californians and presents potential solutions for health professionals, community-based organizations, and private and public funders to improve health and access to care.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, California, Health insurance, Immigrants, Policy development, Research, State programs, Young adults

Park M, McHugh M. 2014. Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies the unique needs of immigrant parents across the range of expectations for parent skill, engagement, and leadership sought by early childhood education and care programs, as well as strategies for addressing these needs. Contents include selected demographics of children of immigrants and their parents, factors jeopardizing meaningful engagement, the importance of parent engagement specific to children of immigrants, federal programming, family literacy and dual-generation strategies, and adult education. Research findings and recommendations are also presented.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult education, Child care, Early childhood education, Federal programs, Immigrants, Intergenerational programs, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Literacy education, Low literacy, Parent professional relations, Parent support services, Parents, Research, Young children

Calderon M, Lopez A. 2014. Think. Create. Aspire. Toward more equitable early childhood systems for immigrant families with young children. Boston, MA: Build Initiative, 1 trainer's guide (21 pp.), 1 presentation (14 slides).

Annotation: These resources provide guidance on implementing a training for early childhood professionals on immigration policy. Contents include a trainer's guide and presentation slides. Topics include immigration policies' impact on young children in immigrant families, recognizing national and state trends and realities of immigrant families with young children, planning for how to increase collaborations among immigrant-serving organizations and early childhood organizations, and committing to ongoing learning and action on behalf of immigrant families.

Contact: Build Initiative, 89 South Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02111, Telephone: (617) 523-6565 E-mail: info@buildinitiative.org Web Site: http://www.buildinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Families, Immigrants, Policy development, Resources for professionals, Training materials, Trends, Young children

Wallace SP, Torres JM, Nobari TZ, Pourat N. 2013. Undocumented and uninsured: Barriers to affordable care for immigrant populations. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund; Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 16 pp.

Annotation: This paper reviews the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's exclusion of approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants residing in this U.S. Topics include additional financial pressures on safety-net hospitals, experiences nationally and in California with the needs of undocumented immigrants and their families, strategies for improving coverage and access for undocumented immigrants, and policy lessons from home and abroad.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, California, Case studies, Health insurance, Needs assessment, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State programs, Trends, Undocumented immigrants, Uninsured persons

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2013. Diverse children: Race, ethnicity, and immigration in America's new non-majority generation. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 36 pp. (Disparities among America's children, no. 1)

Annotation: This report focuses on the current well-being and future prospects of children in eight distinct race-ethnic-immigrant-status groups. The report discusses 19 indicators that focus on family economic resources, health, educational attainment, and demographic circumstances. The report presents two sets of findings for 2010, First, the report discusses each indicator in turn, with results for each race-ethnic-immigrant-status groups, highlighting key disparities across groups. The report then presents an overview, summarizing the overall pattern of disparities across all 19 indicators taken together.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Educational attainment, Ethnic factors, Families, Health, Immigrants, Racial factors

Yoshikawa H, Kholoptseva J. 2013. Unauthorized immigrant parents and their children's development: A summary of the evidence. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report considers how parental unauthorized immigration status affects child development. The report focuses primarily in infants and children from birth through age 8, with a secondary emphasis on older children and adolescents. Topics include the effect of parents' unauthorized status on infant, child, and adolescent development; developmental outcomes: mechanisms of influence; contextual factors influencing developmental outcomes; programs and policies; and immigration reform and children's development.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Child development, Infant development, Legislation, Minority groups, Parents, Programs, Public policy, Undocumented immigrants

Van Hook J, Landale NS, Hillemeier MH. 2013. Is the United States bad for children's health? Risk and resilience among young children of immigrants. Washington, DC: Migration Policy Institute, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes current knowledge about the health of children of immigrants in the United States. The report provides an overview about children of immigrants of all national origins and then focuses on the largest group of children living in the United States today—the children of Mexican immigrants. Topics include the importance of childhood health and health disparities, health among children of immigrants:, and children of Mexican immigrants. For children of Mexican immigrants, the report focuses on asthma, obesity, and explaining poor health outcomes among this population.

Contact: Migration Policy Institute, 1400 16th Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 266-1940 Fax: (202) 266-1900 E-mail: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/contact/index.php Web Site: http://www.migrationpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Minority groups, Asthma, Obesity, Child health, Ethnic factors, Families, Immigrants, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, Racial factors

Martinson ML, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J. [2012]. Race/ethnic and nativity disparities in child overweight in the United States and England. [Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing], 10 pp. (Fragile families working paper; 12-05-FF)

Annotation: This paper focuses on issues related to racial, ethnic, and nativity disparities in overweight in children in the United States and England. The paper addresses four questions: (1) whether disparities in childhood overweight exist for a broad set of racial/ethnic and immigrant groups, (2) whether the association between socioeconomic status and child overweight is similar for different racial/ethnic and immigrant subgroups, (3) whether a mother's age at arrival in the host country moderates the association between immigrant status and child overweight, and (4) whether a mother's obesity mediates a child's overweight. The paper provides background on the issue and discusses data, methods, and results.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Child health, Ethnic factors, Immigrants, International health, Obesity, Racial factors, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Women's health

Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. 2012. Key facts on health coverage for low-income immigrants today and under health reform. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 5 pp. (Key facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of health coverage for immigrants as of early 2012 and the new coverage options they will have when Medicaid is expanded under health care reform, creating new health insurance exchanges that will increase health coverage for citizens and lawfully present non-citizens. The fact sheet provides statistics on current immigrants and their health care coverage (including selected employment characteristics by citizenship status and the uninsured rates of children by citizenship status) and describes the differences between their health coverage before and after the expansion of Medicaid of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) beginning in 2014.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care reform, Health insurance, Immigrants, Medicaid, Statistics

Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Pasquariello J, Schiffmiller A, Frank DA, Coleman S, Breen A, Cook J. 2012. The SNAP vaccine: Boosting children's health. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief provides information about SNAP, a federal program that helps participants afford a nutritionally adequate diet each month, with a particular focus on ensuring that young children have adequate nutrition during this period of rapid brain development. The brief provides an overview of who SNAP supports and how it supports them, and also discusses food insecurity during the recession that began in 2008, other basic needs provided by the program, how the program helps immigrant families, how increasing SNAP benefit levels improves family diet quality and children's health, the cost of a healthy diet, and policy solutions.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Cognitive development, Cost, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Federal programs, Immigrants, Nutrition, Public policy, Supplemental food programs, Young children

National Association of Community Health Centers. 2012. Health wanted: The state of unmet need for primary health care in America. Bethesda, MD: National Association of Community Health Centers, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report, which focuses on the unmet need for primary health care in the United States, discusses why this need exists, contributing factors, and costs and consequences. The report presents community health centers as a solution to this problem and discusses identifying primary care needs, how health centers can meet these needs, the trend toward health centers filling the primary health care gap, and what still needs to be done.

Contact: National Association of Community Health Centers, 7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1100W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 347-0400 Web Site: http://nachc.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community health centers, Community health services, Costs, Culturally competent services, Geographic factors, Cultural factors, High risk groups, Immigrants, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Primary care, Underserved communities, Uninsured persons

Zero to Three. 2012. Making it happen: Overcoming barriers to providing infant-early childhood mental health. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 20 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes the scientific evidence for infant and early childhood mental health services (I-ECMH) policies; examine issues faced by national, state, and local program directors and mental health professionals in providing I-ECMH services; and propose a set of recommendations for policy improvements at the federal level. The publication also provides context for the issues states face when financing services for vulnerable populations. Topics include the importance of including a strong and well-financed I-ECMH component in successful learning and development systems, the science of I-ECMH, barriers, the importance of responding to need of young children who participate in Medicaid, Medicaid eligibility of immigrants and their children, and I-ECMH as a building block to promote greater success for high-needs children when they reach school.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Early childhood development, Eligibility, Federal programs, Health promotion, Immigrants, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Infants with special health care needs, Local programs, Low income groups, Medicaid, Mental health, Mental health services, Public policy, School readiness, State programs, Young children

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2012. Children in immigrant families: Essential to America's future. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 37 pp. (FCD child and youth well-being index (CWI) policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on areas in which children in immigrant families are advantaged or disadvantaged, compared with children with both parents born in the United States. The brief presents findings from 1994 to 2010 in the following categories: overall well-being, family economic well-being, health, educational attainment, community engagement, and social relationships. Results for select countries and regions of origin are also presented.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Communities, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Immigrants, International health, Relationships, Research, Social interaction, Statistical data

Hernandez DJ, Cervantes W. 2011. Children in immigrant families: Ensuring opportunity for every child in America. Washington, DC: First Focus, 26 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief highlights the similarities and differences in circumstances of children in immigrant and native born families, drawing on key indicators from the Foundation for Child Development and Child Well-Being Index (CWI) and additional sources that provide data on citizenship, language skills, and other factors that pertain to children in immigrant families. The brief summarizes key findings based on health indicators that include citizenship, social relationships, community connectedness, family economic well-being, and language skills. The brief also discusses recently passed federal legislation related to children in immigrant families and points to policies aimed at ensuring that the United Sates is securing its future by providing opportunity for every child.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Comparative analysis, Data, Families, Immigrants, Legislation, Public policy, Statistics

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.