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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

Rudd RA, Seth P, Felicita D, Scholl L. 2016. Increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths: United States, 2010–2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(50–51):1445–1452,

Annotation: This report examines overall drug overdose death rates during 2010-2015 and opioid overdose death rates during 2014–2015 by subcategories (natural/semisynthetic opioids, methadone, heroin, and synthetic opioids other than methadone). Rates are stratified by demographics, region, and by 28 states with high quality reporting on death certificates of specific drugs involved in overdose deaths. Implications for public health practice are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic pain, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Heroin, Illicit drugs, Methadone, Mortality rates, Opiates, Prescription drugs, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Preconception health. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, 1 video (4 min., 30 sec).

Annotation: This videorecording provides information about preconception health. It discusses birth control, avoiding smoking and illegal drugs, abstaining from alcohol consumption during pregnancy, vaccinations, receiving regular checkups, taking multivitamins and folic acid, nutrition, and physical activity. Vignettes with women at different stages in their life are presented.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Birth control, Folic acid, Illicit drugs, Immunizations, Multimedia, Nutrition, Physical activity, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Prevention, Smoking, Vitamin supplements, Women's health

QEV Analytics. 2011. The importance of family dinners. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 19 pp. (No. 7)

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between family dinners and specific characteristics that increase or diminish the likelihood that an adolescent will smoke, drink, or use illicit drugs. The following topics are discussed: (1) family dinners and adolescent substance-abuse risk, (2) family dinners and stress, boredom, and academic performance, (3) family dinners and smoking, drinking, and using illicit drugs.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Families, Illicit drugs, Smoking, Stress, Substance abuse

Society for Public Health Education, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, American College of Medical Toxicology. 2007. Helping communities combat clandestine methamphetamine laboratories. Washington, DC: Society for Public Health Education, 150 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for health professionals focuses on the public health challenges of clandestine methamphetamine laboratories (meth labs). The content is presented in two parts. The first part contains a primer on meth and clandestine meth labs, information sheets on different segments of the population affected by meth, a community action guide, and a resource directory. The second part contains information on acute meth lab exposures and toxicity, evaluation of children exposed to meth labs, and environmental considerations in cleaning up meth labs. The toolkit is available as an electronic document or on CD-ROM.

Contact: Society for Public Health Education, 10 G Street, N.E., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-9804 Fax: (202) 408-9815 E-mail: info@sophe.org Web Site: http://www.sophe.org Available from the website; also available on CD-ROM.

Keywords: CD-ROMs, Child health, Children, Environmental exposure, Guidelines, Illicit drugs, Laboratories, Legal issues, Methamphetamines, Oral health, Public health, Toxicology

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2006. Early exposure to toxic substances damages brain architecture. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 16 pp. (Working paper no. 4)

Annotation: This paper discusses exposure to toxic substances in early childhood and how such exposure can disrupt the development of all the body's organ systems. The paper presents the issue and discusses what science tells us and popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and implications for policy and programs.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: , Brain, Chemicals, Early childhood development, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Illicit drugs, Lead, Prescription drugs, Programs, Public policy, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Substance use during pregnancy: 2002 and 2003 update. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on illicit drug use among pregnant and nonpregnant women ages 15 to 44. The fact sheet, which includes results in brief, also discusses illicit drug use, alcohol use, cigarette use, and substance use during the year after giving birth. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Illicit drugs, MCH research, Postpartum women, Smoking, Substance abuse, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use behavior, Surveys, Women's health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Results from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 292 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-28)

Annotation: This report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Overview of findings from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 58 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-27)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2004 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. This initial report on the 2004 data presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental problems are also presented, including data on the co-occurence of substance use and mental problems, and new data on depression among adolescents and adults. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2003 and 2004. A discussion of long-term trends is included in the final chapter. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; prevalence and treatment of mental problems; and trends in substance use prevalence. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.The report includes eight appendices: (1) a description of the survey, (2) statistical methods and measurement, (3) research on the impact of changes in NSDUH methods, (4) key definitions, 2004, (5) other sources of data, (6) references, (7) sample size and population tables, and (8) selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2004. Overview of findings from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 42 pp. (National survey on drug use and health series: H-24)

Annotation: This brief overview report presents the first information from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. A more complete presentation of the initial results of the survey is given in the full report, Results from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings. Both reports present national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental health problems are also included. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2002 and 2003. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; trends in initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; and prevalence and treatment of mental health problems. A discussion is also included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report includes one appendix: prevalence estimate tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Youth illicit drug use prevention: DARE long-term evaluations and federal efforts to identify effective programs. Washington, DC: General Accounting Office, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the evaluation of the long-term effectiveness of the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) Program in preventing illicit drug use among elementary school children. The report also reviews federal efforts to identify similar programs to prevent illicit and non-prescription drug use, as well as other substances such as alcohol and tobacco. Tables outline program descriptions, measures, and prevention outcome for several programs in Kentucky and Colorado, and for several programs identified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Education (ED). Report enclosures include a short list of articles reviewed on the DARE program's effectiveness; the methodology used to select evaluations of DARE program curriculum effectiveness; a listing of programs selected for review; and comments from HHS and ED.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-172R.

Keywords: Elementary schools, Illicit drugs, National programs, Program evaluation, School age children, Substance abuse prevention programs

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2003. School experiences and substance abuse among youths. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 3 pp. (The NHSDA report; July 4, 2003)

Annotation: This report presents results for adolescents (ages 12-17) from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, in which respondents are asked to report use of alcohol and various illicit drugs during the month before the interview. The following topics are covered: (1) prevalence of illicit drug and alcohol use among adolescents, (2) attitudes toward school, and (3) drug or alcohol prevention messages. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report concludes with endnotes and figure and table notes.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Illicit drugs, Prevention, School, Substance abuse, Surveys

Johnston LD, O'Malley PM, Bachman JG, Schulenberg JE. 2000-. Monitoring the Future: National results on adolescent drug use—Overview of key findings, 20__. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research, annual.

Annotation: This annual report analyzes the results of an annual, national survey on drug use among 8th, 10th and 12th graders. Trends of use, perceived risk, disapproval, and availability frame the discussion for each substance examined, and tables illustrate the discussion.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohols, Amphetamines, Cocaine, Drug education, Hallucinogens, Heroin, High risk adolescents, Illicit drugs, Inhalants, Marijuana, Narcotics, National surveys, Risk taking, Sedatives, Statistics, Steroids, Substance abuse, Youth

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. 1996. Substance abuse and the American woman. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 251 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of a study which examined the incidence, prevalence, and impact of substance use by American women. It examines how the use of substances presents more health risks to women than to men; and it considers the origins, patterns, and consequences of women's using substances whether they are illegal drugs, alcohol, tobacco, or prescription drugs. The report analyzes factors that lead women to seek treatment and examines how treatment programs can be designed to serve them. The report evaluates the risks for women in general and the added risks for women who use substances while they are pregnant and for their children. The report identifies areas where more research is needed on this topic and discusses the implications for public health policies.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Illicit drugs, Infant health, Maternal health, Policy development, Prescription drugs, Public health, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abusing pregnant women, Tobacco, Women

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, National Institute on Drug Abuse. 1996. National pregnancy and health survey: Drug use among women delivering live births: 1992. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of the National Pregnancy and Health Survey which was taken in 1992 to determine the prevalence of substance abuse among women who delivered live-born babies during a 12-month period. The report includes background information, describes the objectives and design of the survey, and presents and discusses the findings. Data on the following categories are included: overall estimates of substance use any time during the pregnancy, including prior to and during the pregnancy; sociodemographic patterns of use; and for specific substances: any illicit drug, marijuana, cocaine, crack cocaine, alcohol, tobacco, and substances used in combination. The report focuses at length on the design, implementation, and reporting procedures used in carrying out the survey.

Keywords: Alcohol, Cocaine, Crack cocaine, Demographics, Illicit drugs, Marijuana, Perinatal health, Prenatal health, Prevalence, Statistics, Substance abuse, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Tobacco, Women

Research Triangle Institute. 1990. National household survey on drug abuse: Highlights 1988 [and 1990]. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2 v.

Annotation: This report provides data about the prevalence of use for the total populations and for four age groups: youth, young adults, middle adults, and older adults. It examines the demographic correlates of the use; and provides information about patterns of illicit drug and alcohol use, trends in drug, alcohol, and cigarette use since 1972, and perception of the risk from using drugs and alcohol.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Adults, Alcohol, Illicit drugs, National surveys, Prevalence, Smokeless tobacco, Substance abuse, Tobacco, Trends

Research Triangle Institute. 1989-. National household survey on drug abuse: Population estimates 19__. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, annual.

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. Results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National findings. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies, U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration,

Annotation: This report presents the first information from the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States ages 12 or older. The report presents national estimates of rates of use, numbers of users, and other measures related to illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products. Measures related to mental health problems are also included. A major focus of the report is changes in substance use between 2002 and 2003. The report, which includes highlights, covers the following main topics: illicit drug use; alcohol use; tobacco use; trends in initiation of substance use; youth prevention-related measures; substance dependence, abuse, and treatment; and prevalence and treatment of mental health problems. A discussion is also included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Seven appendices include a description of the survey, statistical methods and measurement, key definitions, other sources of data, references, sample size and population tables, and selected prevalence tables.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Children, Drug use behavior, Health, Illicit drugs, Mental health, National surveys, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance dependence, Tobacco use, Treatment, Trends

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.