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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. Preeclampsia: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force,

Annotation: This resource presents the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The recommendation statement; supporting documents, including the research plan, evidence review, evidence summary, clinical summary; and related information for health professionals.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Evidence based medicine, Hospitals, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Screening, Women's health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

Waidman T. 2009. Estimating the cost of racial and ethnic health disparities. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 18 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief estimates the magnitude of current cost burdens both nationally and for several large states for a select set of preventable diseases (diabetes, hypertension, stroke or renal disease, and poor general health), focusing on racial and ethnic disparities in these diseases. The brief provides background, discusses data and methods, and presents national results and results for selected states.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Costs, Diabetes mellitus, Health, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Hypertension, Low income groups, Medicaid, Prevention, Public policy, Racial factors, Stroke

King ML. 2007. Community health interventions: Prevention's role in reducing racial and ethnic disparities. Washington, DC: Center for American Progress, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the use of community-led interventions to alter risky health behaviors among minority populations who have higher rates of diseases and conditions such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol levels, diabetes, tobacco use, physical inactivity, and obesity than their white counterparts. The report, which includes an executive summary, discusses racial and ethnic health disparities; reducing racial and ethnic health disparities through community interventions; tailored community interventions at work; community interventions in the African-American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander populations; budget implications; and policy recommendations. A conclusion and endnotes are included.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Blacks, Community programs, Diabetes mellitus, Ethnic factors, Financing, High risk groups, Hispanic Americans, Hypertension, Intervention, Obesity, Pacific Islanders, Physical activity, Public policy, Racial factors, Risk factors, Smoking

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute . 2005. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. (Rev. ed.). [Bethesda, MD]: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute , 48 pp.

Annotation: This report updates clinicians on the latest recommendations concerning the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of hypertension in children and adolescents. The report evaluates evidences of early target-organ damages in children and adolescents with hypertension; provides the rationale for early identification and treatment; and provides revised recommendations, based on recent studies, for the use of antihypertensive drug therapy. Treatment recommendations also include updated evaluation of nonpharmacologic therapies to reduce additional cardiovascular risk factors. The report also describes how to identify hypertensive children who need additional evaluation for sleep disorders that may be associated with blood pressure elevation. Appendices include demographic data, computational charts, and a scheme used for classification of the evidence, along with references.

Contact: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Information Center, P.O. Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Telephone: (301) 592-8573 Secondary Telephone: (240) 629-3255 Fax: (301) 592-8563 E-mail: NHLBIinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/infoctr/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Diagnosis, Drug therapy, Hypertension, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Screening, Therapeutics

Stang J, Story M, eds. [2004]. Guidelines for adolescent nutrition services. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Leadership, Education and Training Program in Maternal and Child Nutrition, 1 v.

Annotation: This book, which is geared toward health professionals and educators on nutrition and adolescent pregnancy, focuses on the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive changes that begin during puberty and continue through adolescence, which directly affect nutritional status and nutrient needs. Topics include adolescent growth and development; understanding adolescent eating behaviors; nutrition needs of adolescents; nutrition, screening, and intervention; nutrition education and counseling; promoting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors; the overweight adolescent; the underweight adolescent; iron deficiency anemia; hyperlipidemia; hypertension; eating disorders; body image and adolescents; diabetes mellitus: type 1 and type 2; reproductive health issues; sports nutrition; vegetarian eating patterns; and adolescents with special health care needs. Some of the information is presented in tables. One appendix containing a list of food sources of vitamins and minerals is included.

Contact: University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, West Bank Office Building, 1300 S. Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454-1015, Telephone: (612) 624-1818 Fax: (612) 624-0315 Web Site: http://sph.umn.edu/epi Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, Body image, Diabetes mellitus, Eating disorders, Food habits, Health promotion, Hyperlipidemia, Hypertension, Intervention, Iron deficiency anemia, Nutrition counseling, Nutrition education, Nutritional requirements, Nutritional status, Obesity, Physical activity, Puberty, Reproductive health, Screening, Sports, Underweight, Vegetarianism

Yates B. 2000. Heart health for Black women : a natural approach to healing and preventing heart disease. New York, NY: Marlowe, 244 pp.

Annotation: This book for health and community service professionals and the general public focuses on heart disease risks common among black women. Topics include high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, nutrition, cholesterol, estrogen replacement therapy, and smoking. Alternative treatments such as herbs, vitamins, stress reduction techniques, and visualization techniques are discussed. Appendices include questions for healthcare providers, resources, a stay-on-track checklist, an exercise checklist, and a glossary. An index is provided.

Contact: Marlowe and Company, LLC, 1667 K Street, N.W., Suite 480, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 775-1796 Fax: (202) 775-0214 E-mail: marlowe@marloweco.com Web Site: http://www.marloweco.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-56924-619-X.

Keywords: Alternative medicine, Blacks, Consumer education materials, Diabetes mellitus, Heart diseases, Hormone replacement therapy, Hypertension, Nutrition, Prevention, Smoking, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National High Blood Pressure Education Program. 2000. Working group report on high blood pressure in pregnancy. (Rev. ed.). Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report provides guidance to the practicing physician in 1) managing hypertensive patients who become pregnant and 2) managing pregnant patients who become hypertensive. This report updates the 1990 National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group Report on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy. It expands on recommendations made in the 6th Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC v1). Sections of the report are devoted to classification of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; pathology and pathophysiology; differential diagnoses; chronic hypertension in pregnancy; preeclampsia; postpartum counseling and followup; and recommendations for future research. The section on management of hypertension in pregnancy contains recommendations on diet, alcohol and tobacco use, and lactation.

Keywords: Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Professional education

Menard S. 1999. San Antonio Biethnic Children's Blood Pressure Study: [Final report]. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 38 pp.

Annotation: This study evaluated blood pressures in biethnic (non-Hispanic white and Mexican-American) children, kindergarten through 12th grade, using the auscultatory method (with the cuff selected by the American Heart Association recommendation) and the oscillometric method. Thee study resulted in normative blood pressure (BP) standards for both methods, produced conversion factors between BP levels obtained by the two methods; provided, for the first time, reliable normative BP levels in Mexican-American children and provided information on ethnic differences, in BP levels; and helped to determine relationships between BP levels and other variables such as age, gender, and weight. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106929.

Keywords: Blood Pressure Determination, Hispanics, Hypertension, MCH Research, Mexicans, Research

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. 1997. Update on the task force report (1987) on high blood pressure in children and adolescents: A working group report from the National High Blood Pressure Education Program. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report gives information useful to health professionals in identifying, treating and preventing high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The report includes information on the measurement of blood pressure in children, blood pressure tables adjusted for height, and treatment of hypertension. Also included are tables with blood pressure levels for the 90th and 95th percentiles of blood pressure for boys and girls age 1 to 17 years of age, and anti-hypertensive drug therapy.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Hypertension, Prevention, Therapeutics

Falkner B. 1995. Reduction of Risk for Hypertension in Urban Adolescents [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Medical College of Pennsylvania, 93 pp. 85 pp. appendix pp.

Annotation: This project was designed to test the following hypothesis: Behaviors that contribute to expression of essential hypertension (EH) can be modified in a high-risk urban adolescent population. The study design included randomization of at-risk students to intervention and nonintervention control groups. The intervention program, consisting of health education and behavior modification methodologies, was specific to minority (predominantly black) urban adolescents, and addressed characteristics unique to this high-risk population, including predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-183736.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Hypertension, MCH Research, Research, Urban Population

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics. 1993. Health promotion and disease prevention: United States, 1990. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 95 pp. (Vital and health statistics: Series 10, Data from the national health survey; no. 185)

Annotation: This report presents an update of the "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention: United States, 1985." As with the 1985 report, the 1990 report measures the prevalence of selected health promotion and disease prevention knowledge and practices. Data from this report can be used to assess achievement of some of the 1990 health objectives set by the Surgeon General. An additional section discusses trends between 1985 and 1990 for selected topics. A brief literature review of the following health promotion and disease prevention topics is included: general health habits, high blood pressure, stress, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, dental care, mammography, smoking during pregnancy, injury control, and radon.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Document Number: DHHS (PHS) 93-1513.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption, Disease prevention, Exercise, Health promotion, Health statistics, Hypertension, Injury prevention, Oral health, Smoking during pregnancy, Statistics, Stress

Woteki CE, Thomas PR, eds. 1992. Eat for life: The Food and Nutrition Board's guide to reducing your risk of chronic disease. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 179 pp.

Annotation: This book, the third in a series resulting from the National Research Council's study of the relationship between diet and chronic disease, provides consumers practical recommendations for incorporating the dietary guidelines into everyday life. Other titles based on this study include Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk (1989) and Improving America's Diet and Health: From Recommendations to Action (1991). Eat for Life introduces a nine-point dietary plan for reducing the risk of diet-related chronic disease. Trends in the American diet, both historical and popular, and tips for shopping, cooking, and eating out are included. Protein, fiber, cholesterol, and fat in relation to food are explained, and their relationship to chronic diseases are specified. Among the chronic diseases highlighted are heart disease, hypertension, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis. Appendices include the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowances and resources that provide additional information.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Contact Phone: (800) 624-6242 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Dietary guidelines, Eating disorders, Food habits, Hypertension, Osteoporosis

American Heart Association. 1992. Doctors answer your questions about blood pressure. Dallas,TX: American Heart Association, 8 pp.

Annotation: Testing at a 6th grade reading level (SMOG index), this multicultural cartoon illustrated booklet provides information on hypertension. It talks about what high blood pressure is, how to tell if you have it, and who is at risk. It also provides a list of things one can do to lower their blood pressure.

Contact: American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231-4596, Telephone: (800) AHA-USA1 Secondary Telephone: 1-800-242-8721 Contact Phone: (800) 242-8721 Web Site: http://www.americanheart.org

Keywords: Hypertension

American Heart Association. 1990. About high blood pressure in African-Americans. Dallas,TX: American Heart Association, 9 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet specifically addresses the issue of hypertension in African-Americans. It talks about what high blood pressure is, what the causes are, how to know if you have it, and what can be done to treat it. It is tailored to address diet, exercise and heredity issues specific to the African-American population.

Contact: American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231-4596, Telephone: (800) AHA-USA1 Secondary Telephone: 1-800-242-8721 Contact Phone: (800) 242-8721 Web Site: http://www.americanheart.org

Keywords: Hypertension, Multicultural populations

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 1988. Maternal nutrition: Contemporary approaches to interdisciplinary care. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, 10 v.

Annotation: This teaching curriculum is composed of 10 modules, each designed to be conducted as a seminar for a small interdisciplinary group of maternal health care professionals. Each set of curriculum materials is valued at over $400.00 and is packaged in 10 three-ring binders and includes 800 printed pages, a videotape, and over 400 slides. The course, developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, emphasizes the relationship of good nutrition both preconceptionally and during pregnancy to optimal pregnancy outcomes and addresses many topics including preconceptional nutrition, nutrition during pregnancy, high risk pregnancy, substance abuse, cultural influences on eating, guiding women to healthful food choices, counseling skills, community resources advocacy, and evaluating nutrition interventions. The titles of the ten modules are: 1. The Seamless Web of Influences: Linking Nutrition in Pregnancy with Birth Outcomes; 2. Planning for the Future: Preconceptional Health Care; 3. Eating for Health Outcomes: Nutrition during Pregnancy; 4. Special Diets for Special People: Nutrition Care for the Mother at Risk; 5. Better Living Without Chemistry: Smoking, Drinking, and Drugs in Pregnancy; 6. Pizza, Pickles, and Pica: Cultural Influences on Eating; 7. From Nutrient Needs to " What's for Dinner?:" Guiding Women to Healthful Food Choices; 8. Sharpening Counseling Skills: Working Together to Change Eating Habits; 9. The Community Connection: Resources for Pregnant Women; 10. So What's the Difference?: Measuring the Impact of Nutrition Interventions. Additional materials were added to the modules in February 1990.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Price unknown. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHC119.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Advocacy, Alcohol, Caffeine, Cocaine, Cultural factors, Food habits, Gestational diabetes, High risk pregnancy, Interdisciplinary approach, Marijuana, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition counseling, Preconception care, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Quality assurance, Substance abuse, Teamwork, Tobacco, Vegetarianism

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 1988. Surgeon General's report on nutrition and health. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Public Health Service; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 727 pp., (summ. 78 pp.)

Annotation: This report sets out the major policy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) on the role of diet in health. Developed in response to increasing recognition that the major nutritional problems among Americans are a result of dietary excesses and imbalances rather than deficiencies of single nutrients, the report reviews the scientific evidence on the relationship of diet and chronic disease risk and makes dietary recommendations which can improve the health of many Americans, including that of mothers and children. A separate volume lists the summary and recommendations from the full report.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHA370, MCHA369; GPO No. 017-001-00465-1.

Keywords: Alcohol, Anemia, Breastfeeding, Child nutrition, Dental care, Diabetes mellitus, Gastrointestinal diseases, Health, Health promotion, Hypertension, Infant nutrition, Maternal nutrition, Nervous system disorders, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Policies, Prevention

National Institutes of Health. 1979. Report of the Hypertension Task Force. Washington, DC: National Institutes of Health, 9 v.

Annotation: This task force was established by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to assess the current state of hypertension research. Volume 1 of the report provides general recommendations of the task force for the public and volume 2 provides recommendations for the scientific community. Additional volumes of interest in maternal and child health include 6, on pediatrics and genetics, and 9, on therapy, pregnancy, and obesity.

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries.

Keywords: Cardiovascular diseases, Hypertension, Task forces

Friedman EA, Neff RK. 1977. Pregnancy hypertension: A systematic evaluation of clinical diagnostic criteria. Littleton, MA: PSG Publishing, 258 pp.

Annotation: This book is a major report from the Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP) of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke. It reports on an extensive analysis of data related to pregnancy hypertension, which evaluated the effect of toxemia of pregnancy and its clinical variants on the fetus and on the surviving neonate.

Keywords: Child development, Hypertension, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy toxemias

Kovnat P, Levison SP, Steg NL. 1975. Evaluation of post stress examinations of adolescents. [Philadelphia, PA?]: Medical College of Pennsylvania Adolescent Program, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to help define what constitutes hypertension in African American adolescents and to find reliable noninvasive screening methods to detect those asymptomatic adolescents, at an early age, who are at risk of developing hypertension. Report topics include an introduction to the need for the study; methods and procedures used in the population sample, data collection, laboratory methodology, statistical analysis, and human rights; a review of the results; and discussion and conclusions. Tables provide statistical data and references are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Hypertension, MCH research, Medical research, Pennsylvania, Screening

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.