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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Health and health care for all: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Medicaid-fee-for-service: State resources vary for helping beneficiaries find providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the proportion and characteristics of Medicaid beneficiaries served in fee-for-service arrangements and federal and state resources to help them find participating providers and report related challenges. A discussion of state actions to address access challenges is included. The report addresses medical care and specialty services such as behavioral/mental health care, oral health care, vision care, pharmacies, and ancillary services such as transportation and translation and sign language services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: GAO-16-809.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Consumer satisfaction, Family support services, Hotlines, Information sources, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Provider participation, Service delivery systems, State programs

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2015. Medicaid match for state tobacco cessation quitlines. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for state and territorial health officials describes federal guidance that would allow states to claim tobacco cessation quitline expenditures as a Medicaid administrative cost and receive a 50 percent administrative match rate for services provided to Medicaid beneficiaries. Topics include comprehensive coverage for pregnant women, coverage for individuals who are not pregnant including children, and tobacco cessation telephone quitlines as allowable Medicaid administrative activities. The fact sheet also describes current state status, barriers that have delayed states' implementation of the guideline, and recommendations for how state health agencies can overcome the barriers.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Adolescents, Barriers, Children, Financing, Health care reform, Health insurance, Hotlines, Pregnant women, Program development, Reimbursement, Smoking cessation, State health agencies, Systems development, Tobacco use

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Resources for victims and families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

Lorenzo SB. 2013. Teen violence prevention: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and websites about teen violence prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Electronic publications, Families, Hotlines, School violence, Violence, Violence prevention

Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies. 2011. Reducing effects of postpartum depression: Provider education and maternal empowerment. [Alexandria, VA]: Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies, 1 video (ca. 50 min.).

Annotation: This archived webinar, broadcast July 13, 2011, discusses issues surrounding postpartum and perinatal depression (PPD) and the impact on the health and well-being of mothers and their infant's neurobiological development. Topics include how underreported or underdiagnosed PPD is; varying levels of severity including healthy rebound, "baby blues", diagnosed perinatal depression, postpartum bi-polar disorder, and the rare postpartum psychosis. Topics also include maternal stresses due to lacks of sleep/exhaustion, depression stigma, previous psychological or medical histories, post-traumatic stress from unexpected C-section or adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, partner or violence abuse, and financial stresses. Social risk factors for depression such as multiple births or feeling of isolation are also discussed. Resources are discussed including model state programs, online resources, proposed legislation, and the importance of establishing local postpartum depression networks and support services.

Contact: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300***OPERATIONS MOVED TO ZERO TO THREE*** 5/5/2015, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 837-4792 Fax: (703) 664-0485 E-mail: info@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.hmhb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bonding, Early childhood development, Hotlines, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent support services, Parenting, Perinatal care, Postnatal care, Postpartum depression, Resources for professionals

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. [2009]. Women's mental health: What it means to you. Washington, DC: Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet discusses the unique mental health needs of women and girls and provides tips on recognizing signs of mental problems and where to seek help. Topics include the continuing stigma related to mental illness or disorders, adolescent suicide prevention, eating disorders, pregnancy and postpartum depression, menopause, trauma, violence, and abuse. A resource guide lists agencies and organizations as well as helplines.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Abuse, Adolescent mental health, Brochures, Consumer education materials, Eating disorders, Hotlines, Maternal mental health, Mental disorders, Postpartum depression, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Violence, Women's health

Rosenberg J, Wilcox WB. 2006. The importance of fathers in the healthy development of children. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Child Abuse and Neglect, 118 pp. (Child abuse and neglect user manual series)

Annotation: This manual, written for child protective services caseworkers, discusses child abuse and neglect and examines how to strengthen the roles of fathers within their children's lives and their own. Topics of the first section include (1) recognizing the value of fathers to children; (2) appreciating the importance of fathers to the case planning and service provision process; (3) understanding the issues unique to working with fathers; (4) effectively involving fathers in all aspects of case management, from assessment through case closure; and (5) working successfully with fathers in a wide range of family situations and structures. Section two provides examples of fatherhood programs and federal fatherhood initiatives. Endnotes are provided along with appendices including a glossary of terms, resource listings of selected national organizations concerned with fatherhood and child maltreatment, state telephone numbers for reporting child abuse, a cultural competence self-assessment questionnaire, tips for dads, and components instrumental in building a healthy marriage.

Contact: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 260-5140 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child development, Child protective services, Child protective services, Community programs, Cultural competence, Family relations, Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Federal programs, Hotlines, Resources for professionals

Shealy KR, Li R, Benton-Davis S, Grummer-Strawn LM. 2005. The CDC guide to breastfeeding interventions. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, 67 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose a breastfeeding intervention that best meets their needs. Included in the guide are all types of breastfeeding interventions that have been received by the Cochrane Collaboration and published through the Cochrane Library. The chapters in the guide are divided into two sections based on evidence for effectiveness. In the first section, the evidence is significant; in the second, it is limited. Section 1 includes the following categories: (1) maternity care practices, support for breastfeeding in the workplace, (3) peer support, (4) educating mothers, (5) professional support, and (6) media and social marketing. Section 2 includes the following categories:(1) countermarketing and the WHO International Code, (2) professional education, (3) public acceptance, and (4) hotlines and other information resources. A list of references is included. The guide includes two appendices: (1) expert panel and (2) glossary.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Education, Evidence based medicine, Hotlines, Interventions, Literature reviews, Marketing, Peer support programs, Working mothers

Booth M, Brown T, Richmond-Crum M. 2004. Dialing for help: State telephone hotlines as vital resources for parents of young children. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 11 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief looks at how toll-free hotlines are used to provide families with the support and guidance they need to raise healthy children. Topics covered include (1) a brief history of maternal and child health (MCH) toll-free lines, (2) elements of their operation, (3) a parent tests the lines, (4) opportunities to expand toll-free lines, and (5) enhancing coordination among states. The brief also includes an abstract, as well as state-specific information presented as sidebars. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a table listing MCH toll-free lines and a description of the methodology.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Hotlines, Information networks, Parents, Referrals, State programs

Indiana Perinatal Network and Indiana State Department of Health. [2001]. What kind of mother would give her baby HIV?: An untested one. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Perinatal Network, 1 poster (18 x 24 inches).

U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2000. Toll-free numbers for health information. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion,

Annotation: This electronic document lists toll-free numbers for organizations that provide health-related information, education, and support.

Contact: National Health Information Center, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8281 E-mail: info@nhic.org Web Site: http://www.health.gov/nhic Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Electronic publications, Health promotion, Health services, Hotlines

Rees AM, ed. 1998. The consumer health information source book. (5th ed.). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 226 pp.

Annotation: This sourcebook provides a guide to over 3,500 books, magazines, newsletters, CD-ROMs, software, Internet sites, and pamphlets that are sources of a spectrum of human health information. In addition, 44 information clearinghouses, over 199 toll-free telephone numbers, 27 National Institutes of Health phone contacts, 6 search services for the medical consumer, and more than 278 health-related resource organizations are listed. The book provides author, title, and subject indexes.

Keywords: Directories, Health education, Hotlines, Patient education materials

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, National Health Information Center. 1991-. National health observances. Washington, DC: National Health Information Center, annual.

Annotation: This publication provides an annual listing of special months, weeks, or days that promote particular health concerns. The presentation varies yearly; some use a chronological list for each month; some are displayed as calendars, and some use both formats. The chronological lists include the sponsoring organization's name, address and phone number, contact name, and types of materials that are available to promote the event. The lists are occasionally supplemented by information on federal health information centers and clearinghouses, and toll-free phone numbers providing access to health information. The publication has been issued as part of the Healthfinder series, as a special issue of "Prevention Report, " and as a separate document.

Contact: National Health Information Center, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8281 E-mail: info@nhic.org Web Site: http://www.health.gov/nhic Available at no charge.

Keywords: Clearinghouses, Federal programs, Health observances, Health promotion, Hotlines., Resource centers

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 1990. Building on the basics: Four approaches to enhancing MCH service delivery. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes what the state Title V maternal and child health programs are doing in the areas of service delivery through home visits, integration of services through one-stop shopping, provision of toll-free numbers, and creation of handbooks for recording health problems or health service. (Research funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau)

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Hotlines, Manuals, Medical records, Program coordination, State MCH programs, Surveys

National Library of Medicine. Health hotlines: Toll-free numbers from the National Library of Medicine's DIRLINE database. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine,

Annotation: This resource provides a database of health-related organizations operating toll-free telephone services. The database also includes information on services and publications available in Spanish. The resource is also available as a mobile application. [Note: Health Hotlines will remain online until the end of January, 2017, at which time it will be retired.]

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Contact Phone: (301) 496-1131 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Health promotion, Hotlines, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Spanish language materials

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.