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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (110 total).

Aris C, Weeks C, American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians. n.d.. Taking your baby home from the NICU: Facts about safe sleep. [Marietta, GA]: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure is for parents taking home their newborn that has been discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It defines sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and provides advice on safe sleep positioning and environments for the infant at home. Topics also include the increased risk factors for SIDS of infants that have needed special care at birth, the importance of breastfeeding, not sharing a bed with an infant by parents or siblings, "tummy time", proper bedtime clothing and temperature, the use of a pacifier, and a safe crib. It mentions differences between how things were done in the NICU and how they should be done at home.

Contact: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 528 Raven Way, Naples, FL 34110, Telephone: (239) 431-5425 Fax: (239) 431-5536 E-mail: AASPP@sids.org Web Site: http://www.aaspp.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Consumer education materials, High risk infants, Hospitals, Infant health, Injury prevention, Neonatal intensive care units, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep position

Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic. n.d.. Safe sleep for your special baby. Haymarket, VA: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of a premature baby discusses safe sleep practices that should be followed once the infant is discharged from the hospital. It discusses practices suitable for the NICU that are no longer needed and may be unsafe once the infant is at home. It provides tips on following the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines on back sleeping, safe cribs, not covering the baby's head and face, no smoking, no overheating, talking with others who care for the baby, and tummy time for the awake infant who is closely supervised.

Contact: Sudden Infant Death Services of the Mid-Atlantic, P.O. Box 799, Haymarket, VA 20168, E-mail: sidsma27@aol.com Web Site: http://www.sidsma.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Hospitals, Neonatal intensive care units, Premature infants, Prevention, SIDS

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2017. Availability, outcomes, and federal support related to pediatric trauma care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report describes what is known about the availability of trauma centers for children and the outcomes for children treated at different types of facilities. The report also examines how, if at all, federal agencies are involved in supporting pediatric trauma care and how these activities are coordinated. Topics include the location of high-level pediatric trauma centers, the percentage of children who live within 30 miles of a high-level pediatric trauma center, and how well such centers work to lower mortality. Additional topics include federal interagency coordination to support hospital-based pediatric trauma care activities and training and resources available to physicians and nurses for pediatric trauma care. Examples are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-17-334.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal agencies, Health care delivery, Injuries, Interagency cooperation, Outcome and process assessment, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Training, Trauma care, Trauma centers, Work force

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. Preeclampsia: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force,

Annotation: This resource presents the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on screening for preeclampsia in pregnant women with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The recommendation statement; supporting documents, including the research plan, evidence review, evidence summary, clinical summary; and related information for health professionals.

Contact: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1584 Web Site: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Evidence based medicine, Hospitals, Preeclampsia, Pregnancy induced hypertension, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Reproductive health, Screening, Women's health

U.S. Department of Education. 2016. Healthy students, promising futures: State and local action steps and practices to improve school-based health. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 16 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit contains information that details five high impact opportunities for states and local school districts to support communities through collaboration between the education and health sectors, highlighting best practices and key research in both areas. Contents include resources, programs, and services offered by non-governmental organizations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Educational reform, Eligibility, Health care reform, Health education, Health insurance, Health services delivery, Hospitals, Medicaid managed care, Needs assessment, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Role, School districts, State government, Students

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Provider networks: Comparison of child-focused network adequacy standards between CHIP and private health plans. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the inclusion of pediatric providers, including children's hospitals, in Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and qualified health plans (QHPs). Topics include federal and selected state CHIP and QHP adequacy standards, the extent to which selected issuers of CHIP plans and QHPs include children's hospitals and otherwise help ensure access to pediatric specialists, and how the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and selected states monitor CHIP plan and QHP compliance with adequacy standards.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-16-219.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children's Health Insurance Program, Health insurance, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Standards, Work force

Roy B, Stanojevich J, Stange P, Jiwani N, King R, Koo D. 2016. Development of the Community Health Improvement Navigator database of interventions. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(2):1–9,

Annotation: This report describes an online tool to support hospitals in selecting and implementing evidence-based interventions that have been effective in similar communities with similar collaborators to develop plans to address problems identified in the triennial community health needs assessment, in alignment with IRS requirements for tax-exempt status. The report focuses on the development of a critical component of the Community Health Improvement Navigator (CHI Navigator), the database of interventions, and describes the conceptual framework and methods used in the development of the database.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community health, Databases, Health planning, Hospitals

Gale J, Coburn A, Pearson K, Croll Z, Shaler G. 2016. Population health strategies of critical access hospitals. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Maine Rural Health Research Center, 24 pp. (Briefing paper #36)

Annotation: This paper presents findings from a study to assess the population health strategies and models that critical access hospitals (CAHs) have undertaken, the challenges they have faced, and the factors that have contributed to their successes. Contents include discussion of initiatives and experiences of eight CAHs and how states and others can assist and support CAHs with population health and community health improvement initiatives. Topics include responsiveness to community health needs assessment; strong board and hospital leadership; a well-developed infrastructure; skilled and dedicated staff; an organizational and governance strategy that allows for community partnerships; and a willingness to share responsibility, resources, and credit with community partners.

Contact: University of Southern Maine, Rural Health Research Center, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, Telephone: (207) 780-4430 Secondary Telephone: (207) 780-5646 Fax: (207) 780-4060 Web Site: https://usm.maine.edu/muskie/cutler/mrhrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community participation, Hospitals, Leadership, Model programs, Needs assessment, Program improvement, Quality assurance

Martinez A. 2016. Opportunities for school and hospital partnership in the management of chronic health conditions. Atlanta, GA; National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 23 pp.

Annotation: This brief for state health departments highlights examples of school and hospital partnerships to improve children's health, and how state school health and nursing service personnel can support their collaboration. Topics include the importance of school and hospital partnership in managing chronic health conditions in schools, how health department involvement in a hospital community health needs assessment process can help to strengthen school and hospital partnership, and opportunities to strengthen school and hospital partnership through Medicaid. Additional contents include examples of school and hospital partnership in Massachusetts, Ohio, and Texas; and descriptions of key resources.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: http://www.chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Disease management, Hospitals, Medicaid, Needs assessment, Nursing, Public private partnerships, Reimbursement, Resources for professionals, School health services, Schools, State health agencies, State programs, Students

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2015. Area health resources files. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, multiple items.

Annotation: This family of health data resource products is drawn from a county-level database assembled annually from over 50 sources. It includes (1) databases that can be downloaded; (2) comparison tools that enable local health planners, administrators, and researchers to compare a county's or state's available health resources and health status indicators to those available from other counties or states based on selected criteria; and (3) a mapping tool that enables users to prepare maps that compare the availability of health professionals as well as environmental factors impacting health at the county and state levels. Data categories include health care professions (including dentists and other oral health professionals); hospitals and health care facilities; and census, population data, and environment. Selected national and state data not available for smaller geographic areas are included.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Health facilities, Health professions, Health status, Hospitals

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2015. Best Fed Beginnings final report. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a nationwide three-year effort in partnership with Baby-Friendly USA and the United States Breastfeeding Committee to help hospitals improve maternity care practices to support breastfeeding, and increase the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the United States. The report details the activities of the BFB initiative and evaluates its effectiveness in meeting the mission and aims.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Evaluation, Infant health, Maternity hospitals, Model programs, Mothers, National initiatives, Nutrition

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2015. Strengthen the evidence for MCH programs: Environmental scan of strategies National Performance Measure (NPM) #3: Perinatal regionalization. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: This environmental scan identifies collections of strategies to advance performance for NPM #3: Perinatal Regionalization--percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants born in a hospital with a Level III+ neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It includes a list of reviews and compilations on the topic; frameworks and landmark initiatives; databases and related search terms; and inclusion and exclusion criteria. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Evidence-based practice, Hospitals, Literature reviews, Low birthweight infants, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services for Children Program; Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center; Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response; National Library of Medicine, Disaster Information Management Research Center. 2014-. Health resources on children in disasters and emergencies. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: This website is a compendium of resources related to medical and public health issues of children in disasters and emergencies. Contents include links to journal articles and other documents and materials that may be useful in preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery activities. Resources are national or international in scope. Topics include natural disasters; chemical and biological agents, radiologicals and nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); psychological and behavioral health; and special topics such as children with disabilities, school and care providers, hospital preparedness, resilience, and pandemics.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Communicable diseases, Databases, Disaster planning, Disasters, Emergencies, Emergency medical services for children, Hospitals, International health, Mental health, Resilience, Resources for professionals, Schools, Special health care needs

Children's Hospital Association. 2014. 2013 survey findings of children's hospitals: Obesity services. Washington, DC: Children's Hospital Association, 36 pp.

Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center, Mercy Children's Hospital. 2014. Hospital to medical home: Final report . Toledo, OH: Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center, 22 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes the Hospital to Medical Home project, designed to to maximize the health status and quality of life of children with life limiting and/or life threatening special health care needs by implementing a model for their safe transition from the acute care hospital setting to a qualified medical home. The report describes the purpose of the project and its relationship to Title V maternal and child health programs, the program's goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, and outcomes. It also describes the products and publications produced during the project, the dissemination of the project results, and future plans for sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau.]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Contact E-mail: pamela_oatis@mhsnr.org Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Critical care, Final reports, Hospitals, Medical home, Models, Transition planning

National Quality Forum. 2014. Playbook for the successful elimination of early elective deliveries. Washington, DC: National Quality Forum, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on and strategies for reducing rates of early elective delivery (EED). Topics include the current landscape for eliminating EED, barriers to reducing EED and strategies to overcome them, challenges and barriers to monitoring performance and progress toward eliminating EED, key strategies to promote readiness for EED activities, and measurement guidance. Additional contents include educational tools, resources, and exemplars to support EED elimination efforts, as well as instructions for accessing relevant data.

Contact: National Quality Forum, 1030 15th Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 783-1300 Fax: (202) 783-3434 E-mail: info@qualityforum.org Web Site: http://www.qualityforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Cesarean section, Childbirth, Hospitals, Induced labor, Measures, Obstetrical care, Policy development, Program improvement, Quality assurance

Barnett K. 2014. Supporting alignment and accountability in community health improvement: The development and piloting of a regional data-sharing system. New Orleans, LA: National Network of Public Health Institutes, 126 pp.

Annotation: This report examines community health needs assessments and implementation strategies of tax-exempt hospitals with a focus on how community has been defined; how community stakeholders have been engaged in assessment, planning, and implementation; how priorities have been set; and the content and geographic focus of implementation strategies.

Contact: National Network of Public Health Institutes, 1515 Poydras Street, Suite 1200, New Orleans, LA 70112, Telephone: (888)996-6744 Secondary Telephone: (504)301-9820 Fax: (504) 301-9820 Web Site: http://www.nnphi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Community participation, Decision making, Hospitals, Information systems, Needs assessment, Program improvement, Public health, Regional planning

California WIC Association and UC Davis Lactation Center. 2014. Bringing breastfeeding home: Building communities of care. Sacramento, CA: California WIC Association, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources present information on breastfeeding rates among hospitals in California. Contents include a report and state and county fact sheets. Topics include the lifelong health advantages of exclusive breastfeeding and efforts to support mothers to meet their breastfeeding goals.

Contact: California WIC Association, 1107 Ninth Street, Suite 625, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (916) 448-2280 Fax: (916) 448-7826 E-mail: ltrue@calwic.org Web Site: http://www.calwic.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, California, Hospitals, Measures, State programs, Statistical data

Townley C, Mooney K. 2014. The role of hospitals in medical home initiatives and strategies to secure their support and participation. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 16 pp.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.