Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (37 total).

Holden E. n.d.. Families in Transition: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 39 pp.

Annotation: Families in Transition (FIT) was a comprehensive health care program for homeless children and their families that was a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Health Care for the Homeless, Inc. The FIT program provided primary health care services and a wide array of psychosocial services to homeless children and their families. A substantial emphasis was placed upon outreach services that involved linking and collaborating with other service systems in the community. The FIT program developed an innovative model of service delivery that addressed the needs of thousands of homeless children and their families over its five years of operation. Material were developed and information was disseminated that will assist with the development and replication of these types of programs in the future. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-134876.

Keywords: Case Management, Families, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Homelessness, Preventive Health Care

National Health Care for the Homeless Council and United Health Care Community & State. 2016. Managed care and homeless populations: Linking the HCH community and MCO partners. Nashville, TN: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief is intended to serve as a resource for managed care entities looking to better understand homelessness, for health professionals seeking to be more aware of managed care and its interests, and for both groups to better understand the common goals each brings to a partnership. The brief includes the health care needs of people who are homeless, describes Health Care for the Homeless projects and the patients receiving care in these venues, a description of managed care, common goals between both entities, and issues that both providers and plans should consider when creating or strengthening partnerships.

Contact: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206-0427, Telephone: (615) 226-2292 Fax: (615) 226-1656 E-mail: council@nhchc.org Web Site: http://www.nhchc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health insurance, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Managed care, Medicaid managed care, Public private partnerships

Pergamit M, Gelatt J, Stratford B, Beckwith S, Martin MC. 2016. Family interventions for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The report includes a summary of common elements of effective interventions and a discussion of gaps in the evidence base. Key implementation lessons and challenges of implementing family intervention models are also included. The appendices contain information abuot the literature review methodology; key informants; and program descriptions including evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, and emerging interventions as well as interventions of interest and those with mixed findings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interventions, Model programs, Youth services

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children. 2013. Early care and education for young children experiencing homelessness. Greensboro, NC: National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE; National Association for the Education of Homeless Children, 14 pp. (Best practices in homeless education brief series)

Annotation: This brief provides information and suggests best practices to increase the enrollment of and provision of services to families with young children experiencing homelessness. It presents an overview of the problem; describes legislation and programs that support homeless children; and explains how schools, service provider agencies, and early childhood programs can collaborate to help overcome the barriers hat separate young homeless children and families from the support they need. Included is a table listing programs that include provisions for homeless children, including the services provided, eligibility, and contact information.

Contact: National Center for Homeless Education, SERVE, P.O. Box 5367, Greensboro, NC 27435, Telephone: (800) 308-2145 Fax: (336) 315-7457 E-mail: homeless@serve.org Web Site: http://center.serve.org/nche/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early intervention, Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Young children

National Collaboration for Youth. 2012. Building a brighter future: An essential agenda for America's young people. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Collaboration for Youth, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report presents federal public policy recommendations that are intended to improve children's health, safety, and well-being, and improve the education system with the goals of saving money, strengthening families, producing a more educated work force, and laying a base for America that will thrive into the next century. Topics covered include early childhood, education, after-school and summer programs, child welfare, healthy children and adolescents, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, runaway and homeless adolescents, adolescent services, and adolescent employment.

Contact: National Human Services Assembly, 1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 347-2080 Fax: (202) 393-4517 E-mail: wowens@nassembly.org Web Site: http://www.nassembly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, After school programs, Child health, Early childhood education, Education, Employment, Homelessness, Juvenile delinquents, Poverty, Prevention, Public policy, Runaways, Safety

McCoy-Roth M, Mackintosh BB, Murphey D. 2012. When the bough breaks: The effects of homelessness on young children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Early childhood highlights)

Annotation: This brief highlights the effects of homelessness on children and notes several policies and practices that could help mitigate negative outcomes. With a particular emphasis on young children (under age six), the report discusses trends in homelessness, the negative effects of homelessness on child development, the importance of early childhood care and education opportunities for homeless children, and the barriers to using early learning programs that homeless families face, and implications for policy and practice. The brief also provides state by state comparisons of performance in serving homeless children compiled by the Campaign to End Child Homelessness.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development, Homelessness, Policy development, Program improvement, Trends, Young children

Zero to Three. 2012. Starting life without a home: Supporting homeless families in nuturing their infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 1 video (7 min., 34 sec.).

Annotation: This video outlines a Congressional briefing held February 16, 2012 to discuss the developmental impacts and needs of homeless infants and toddlers in America. Topics include outcomes for homeless children, statistical data on homeless children and their families, the impact of unresolved stress for families and their children, as well as a review of programs that work in early intervention.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child development, Children, Early intervention, Homelessness, Infant health, Young children

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2011. Leading change: A plan for SAMHSA's roles and actions 2011-2014. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic initiatives that the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has identified to guide its work through 2014. For each initiative, background is presented, along with an issue statement and specific goals and objectives. The strategic initiatives discussed include: (1) prevention of substance abuse and mental illness; (2) trauma and justice; (3) military families; (4) health care reform implementation; (5) housing and homelessness; (6) heath information technology; (7) data, outcomes, and quality; and (8) public awareness and support.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge (hipping charges may apply); also available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health care reform, Homelessness, Housing, Information, Initiatives, Mental health, Military, Outcomes, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistical data, Strategic plans, Substance abuse, Trauma

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law. 2011. It's your life. Washington, DC: American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law,

Annotation: This website is geared toward helping adolescents in foster care who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) navigate the child welfare system. The site provides information about harassment, discrimination, and violence; homelessness and running away; health and sexuality; and state-specific resources. A 24-hour hotline is included. The site also adresses common questions, presents stories about LGBTQ adolescents, discusses life after foster care, and provides other related information.

Contact: American Bar Association, Center on Children and the Law, 740 15th Street, N.W., , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 662-1000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 285-2221 Fax: (202) 662-1755 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.abanet.org/child Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Child welfare agencies, Children's rights, Discrimination, Foster care, Homelessness, Homosexuality, Runaways, Sexual harassment, Violence

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2010. Women's health highlights: Recent findings. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 28 pp. (Program brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of recent findings from a cross-section of Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-supported research projects on conditions especially important to women's health. Examples of topics included in the brief are cardiovascular disease, cancer screening and treatment, reproductive health, women and medications, and prevention. For each topic, facts are presented and then elaborated upon. The studies from which the facts are drawn are identified by author names, journal in which the study appears, and (in some cases) AHRQ grant or contract number.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no.10-P005.

Keywords: AIDS, Access to health care, Alternative medicine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Costs, Family planning, HIV, Homelessness, Hysterectomy, Osteoporosis, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Research, Screening, Treatment, Violence, Women's health, Working women

Boylan E, Splansky D. 2010. Access to pre-K education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Newark, NJ: Education Law Center, 16 pp. (Pre-K policy brief series)

Annotation: This policy brief provides an overview of the federal law requiring states to ensure that homeless children have equal access to the same free, appropriate, public education, including a public preschool education, as provided to other children. The brief also discusses the law's limitations and barriers to pre-kindergarten (pre-k) attendance and describes policies that can help increase the number of homeless children included in pre-k programs. The brief is intended to serve as a resource for state policymakers and advocates seeking to maximize participation in pre-k programs.

Contact: Education Law Center, 60 Park Place, Suite 300, Newark, NJ 07102, Telephone: (973) 624-1815 Secondary Telephone: (973) 624-4618 Fax: (973) 624-7339 E-mail: elc@edlawcenter.org Web Site: http://www.edlawcenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Legislation, Advocacy, Children, Cultural barriers, Early childhood education, Financial barriers, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Language barriers, Low income groups, Poverty, Preschool children, Public policy, Young children

Gewirtz AH. 2010. Homeless shelters, permanent/supportive housing, and transitional housing. North Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 8 pp. (Moving from evidence to action; issue brief no. 6)

Annotation: This issue brief translates emerging research and program practice into action steps for providers to design and implement programs that meet the needs of children who are exposed to violence and living in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing. The brief aims to build the capacity of housing and homelessness service providers to offer sensitive, timely, and appropriate interventions that enhance children's safety, promote their resilience, and ensure their well-being. The brief includes case scenarios and analyses and a discussion of signs and symptoms of exposure to violence, impact of exposure to violence on children, working with families who live in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing, evidence-based practices, building the infrastructure, and special considerations.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Domestic violence, Families, Family violence, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interpersonal violence, Intervention, Research, Safety, Service delivery, Violence, programs

Children's Health Fund and National Center for Disaster Preparedness. 2009. Legacy of shame: The on-going public health disaster of children struggling in post-Katrina Louisiana (rev. ed.). [New York, NY]: Children's Health Fund, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on high-risk, low-income families suffering from the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The report provides key findings from the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health study, a longitudinal study of 1,082 randomly sampled Gulf Coast households displaced by Hurricane Katrina. The report also provides background, discusses health care delivery provided by the Children's Health Fund/LSU Baton Rouge Children's Health Project, and provides recommendations.

Contact: Children's Health Fund, 215 West 125th Street, Suite 301 , New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 535-9400 Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Disasters, Health care delivery, Homelessness, Louisiana, Low income groups, Poverty, Public health, Underserved communities

Aratani Y. 2009. Homeless children and youth: Causes and consequences. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses the causes and consequences of homelessness in children and adolescents. Topics include who homeless children and adolescents are, contributing factors, the impact of homelessness in children and adolescents, current policies and practices, and key recommendations.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child welfare, Children, Economic factors, Education, Families, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Housing programs, Legislation, Mental health, Public policy, Violence

Child Trends Data Bank. 2009. Homeless children and youth. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistics on homeless children and youth in the United States. Using 2005-06 data submitted under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, the fact sheet provides data on differences based on age, poverty status, race and ethnicity, and current living situation. The fact sheet provides links to state and local statistics; related child health indicators; and local efforts that have proven effective in improving housing stability. A chart indicates the distribution of U.S. children under 18, according to parents' race/ethnicity.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Homelessness, Racial factors, Social indicators, Statistics, Youth

Duffield B, Lovell P. 2008. The economic crisis hits home: The unfolding increase in child and youth homelessness. Washington, DC: First Focus and National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a survey of a school district homeless liaisons conducted by the National Association for the Education of Homeless Children and Youth and First Focus between October 24 and December 10, 2008. The report also presents policy recommendations for the new administration and Congress, as well as practice recommendations for schools and community agencies. The report discusses recent increases in student homelessness, specific challenges cited by school districts, the impact of homelessness on children and adolescents, school as a safety net, and what schools and community agencies can do.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Communities, Families, Homelessness, Low income groups, Poverty, Schools

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2008. The characteristics and needs of families experiencing homelessness. Newton, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 9 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the scope, causes, and impact of homelessness on children and families throughout the United States. The fact sheet discusses the number of homeless families, why families are homeless and who these families are; what the experiences of homeless mothers, homeless children, and homeless families are; what can be done; and where to go to learn more.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Poverty

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.