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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (73 total).

Children's Aid Society. n.d.. A history of innovation. New York, NY: Children's Aid Society, 1 v.

Annotation: This timeline tracks historic highlights from the Children's Aid Society's (CAS) founding in 1853, tracing changes in poverty in New York City along with the evolution of CAS programs and services. Topics include emigration programs such as the Orphan Train, foster care and adoption programs, lodging houses, industrial schools, convalescent homes, health centers, and farm schools.

Contact: Children's Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 949-4800 Secondary Telephone: (212) 949-4936 Fax: (212) 377-4705 Web Site: http://www.childrensaidsociety.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, History, Homeless persons, New York, Oral health, Poverty, Schools

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

National Health Care for the Homeless Council and United Health Care Community & State. 2016. Managed care and homeless populations: Linking the HCH community and MCO partners. Nashville, TN: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief is intended to serve as a resource for managed care entities looking to better understand homelessness, for health professionals seeking to be more aware of managed care and its interests, and for both groups to better understand the common goals each brings to a partnership. The brief includes the health care needs of people who are homeless, describes Health Care for the Homeless projects and the patients receiving care in these venues, a description of managed care, common goals between both entities, and issues that both providers and plans should consider when creating or strengthening partnerships.

Contact: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206-0427, Telephone: (615) 226-2292 Fax: (615) 226-1656 E-mail: council@nhchc.org Web Site: http://www.nhchc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health insurance, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Managed care, Medicaid managed care, Public private partnerships

Pergamit M, Gelatt J, Stratford B, Beckwith S, Martin MC. 2016. Family interventions for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The report includes a summary of common elements of effective interventions and a discussion of gaps in the evidence base. Key implementation lessons and challenges of implementing family intervention models are also included. The appendices contain information abuot the literature review methodology; key informants; and program descriptions including evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, and emerging interventions as well as interventions of interest and those with mixed findings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interventions, Model programs, Youth services

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Friends of Children Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters: Poverty and child health–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 21 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of program summaries describes the approaches of American Academy of Pediatrics' state chapters to develop and implement programs focused on poverty and child health in California, New York City, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Topics include developing and using innovative technologies to address food insecurity, pediatricians promoting food security, ensuring the delivery of health and developmental screening services to young children who are homeless, supporting adolescent parents and their children, and accessing summer meal programs. Each summary includes information about program collaboration, evaluation and measurement, outcomes, barriers and lessons learned, and future plans.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, Developmental screening, Food, Health screening, Healthy People 2020, Homeless persons, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition, Poverty, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships

Bassuk EL, DeCandia CJ, Beach CA, Berman F. 2014. America's youngest outcasts. Waltham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 3 items.

Annotation: This report documents the number of homeless children in every state, their well-being, their risk for child homelessness, and state-level planning and policy efforts. The report also ranks the states in four domains, and presents a composite of these domains to rank the states from 1 (best) to 50 (worst). A page about the District of Columbia is also available.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Homeless persons, Housing, Socioeconomic conditions, State surveys, Statistical data

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Fact sheet: Impact of the ACA on vulnerable youth. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines implications of the Affordable Care Act for specific populations of adolescents and young adults including those aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. Contents include common characteristics of these populations and the obstacles that could prevent them from securing health insurance coverage. Topics include state Medicaid expansion and complexities of the application and enrollment process. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Implementing the Affordable Care Act: How much will it help vulnerable adolescents and young adults?. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores the implications of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for adolescents and young adults who are aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. For each group, the brief provides an overview of demographic characteristics and health status, and discusses access to health care and health insurance before and after the ACA. The brief concludes with a discussion of common themes and upcoming challenges for the three populations. An accompanying fact sheet summarizes the ACA's implications for these groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children. 2013. Early care and education for young children experiencing homelessness. Greensboro, NC: National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE; National Association for the Education of Homeless Children, 14 pp. (Best practices in homeless education brief series)

Annotation: This brief provides information and suggests best practices to increase the enrollment of and provision of services to families with young children experiencing homelessness. It presents an overview of the problem; describes legislation and programs that support homeless children; and explains how schools, service provider agencies, and early childhood programs can collaborate to help overcome the barriers hat separate young homeless children and families from the support they need. Included is a table listing programs that include provisions for homeless children, including the services provided, eligibility, and contact information.

Contact: National Center for Homeless Education, SERVE, P.O. Box 5367, Greensboro, NC 27435, Telephone: (800) 308-2145 Fax: (336) 315-7457 E-mail: homeless@serve.org Web Site: http://center.serve.org/nche/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early intervention, Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Young children

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

Hwang, A. 2012. Supporting Pan Asian Runaway and Homeless Youth: Special Projects of Regional and National Significance—[Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Asian Media Access, 33 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a project to provide Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) runaway and homeless youth in Minnesota culturally-appropriate health services, through RICE (Reaching Immigrants with Care & Education). The 2007-2012 project included street outreach, health education, prevention and intervention services designed for AAPI street youth, aged between 10-18 years old, with a special focus on Hmong runaway girls who bear highest risk of being subjected to sexual abuse. Report contents include a description of the project and realtionship to Title V maternal and child health programs, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, dissemination and utilization of results, as well as future plans and sustainability. The appendix includes the evaluation report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Asian Americans, Final reports, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Outreach, Pacific Islanders, Runaways, Youth

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2012. Fostering healthy families through stable housing: The role of the health care system. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 3 pp. (Fact sheet: Women, children and adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses where children experiencing housing instability and homelessness access health care and what health plans and health plan foundations can do to support healthy, affordable housing. It also examines what health plans and health plan foundations are already doing in this area. Additional contents include information about children in the foster care system and a list of resources. A webinar on this topic, held on July 26, 2012, is also available from the website.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Foster children, Foundations, Health care systems, Health plans, Homeless persons, Housing, Multimedia

Boylan E, Splansky D. 2010. Access to pre-K education under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. Newark, NJ: Education Law Center, 16 pp. (Pre-K policy brief series)

Annotation: This policy brief provides an overview of the federal law requiring states to ensure that homeless children have equal access to the same free, appropriate, public education, including a public preschool education, as provided to other children. The brief also discusses the law's limitations and barriers to pre-kindergarten (pre-k) attendance and describes policies that can help increase the number of homeless children included in pre-k programs. The brief is intended to serve as a resource for state policymakers and advocates seeking to maximize participation in pre-k programs.

Contact: Education Law Center, 60 Park Place, Suite 300, Newark, NJ 07102, Telephone: (973) 624-1815 Secondary Telephone: (973) 624-4618 Fax: (973) 624-7339 E-mail: elc@edlawcenter.org Web Site: http://www.edlawcenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Legislation, Advocacy, Children, Cultural barriers, Early childhood education, Financial barriers, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Language barriers, Low income groups, Poverty, Preschool children, Public policy, Young children

Gewirtz AH. 2010. Homeless shelters, permanent/supportive housing, and transitional housing. North Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 8 pp. (Moving from evidence to action; issue brief no. 6)

Annotation: This issue brief translates emerging research and program practice into action steps for providers to design and implement programs that meet the needs of children who are exposed to violence and living in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing. The brief aims to build the capacity of housing and homelessness service providers to offer sensitive, timely, and appropriate interventions that enhance children's safety, promote their resilience, and ensure their well-being. The brief includes case scenarios and analyses and a discussion of signs and symptoms of exposure to violence, impact of exposure to violence on children, working with families who live in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing, evidence-based practices, building the infrastructure, and special considerations.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Domestic violence, Families, Family violence, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interpersonal violence, Intervention, Research, Safety, Service delivery, Violence, programs

Children's Health Fund. 2009. Children's health care: Health information technology and electronic health records. New York, NY: Children's Health Fund, 2 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This brief addresses the connection between high-quality comprehensive health care and readily available and usable information in the form of electronic health records (EHRs). The brief discusses the experience of the New York Children's Health Project (CHF), which serves many homeless families. CHF responded to this challenge by developing its first-generation EHR system in 1989 and subsequently developed more sophisticated systems. The brief also includes recommendations.

Contact: Children's Health Fund, 215 West 125th Street, Suite 301 , New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (212) 535-9400 Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health services, Homeless persons, Information systems, Medical records, Technology

National Alliance to End Homelessness, National Network for Youth, Lambda Legal, National Center for Lesbian Rights. 2009. National recommended best practices for serving LGBT homeless youth. Washington, DC: National Alliance to End Homelessness, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents recommendations for employees, administrators and supervisors, and youth workers in agencies and nonprofit organizations to increase their competency in working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adolescents and young adults. Recommendations for improving practices, organizational culture, and residential services are included.

Contact: National Alliance to End Homelessness, 1518 K Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-1526 Fax: (202) 638-4664 E-mail: naeh@naeh.org Web Site: http://www.endhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Competence, Homeless persons, Homosexuality, Organizational change, Program improvement, Residential programs, Sex roles, Sociocultural factors, Young adults

Bernstein N, Foster LK. 2008. Voices from the street: A survey of homeless youth by their peers. Sacramento, CA: California State Library, California Research Bureau, 129 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the experiences of homeless adolescents and young adults in California in their own words. Also presented are ideas for change at the policy and service delivery levels. Topics covered include (1) trajectory into homelessness, (2) life on the street, (3) interactions with law enforcement, (4) education and aspirations, (5) mental health, (6) networks of support and social connectedness, (7) sources of help, and (8) questions to add to the survey in the future. The report includes one appendix: youth homelessness: numbers and characteristics. References and endnotes are included.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Education, Homeless persons, Mental health, Public policy, Service delivery, Social support, Surveys, Young adults

Helman C, O'Brien R. 2008. Analysis of Pierce County Project Homeless Connect 2008. [Tacoma, WA]: School of Nursing, Pacific Lutheran University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a community-based event held on October 15, 2008, in Pierce County, Oregon, to increase awareness about homelessness and provide access to health and social services for individuals and families who are homeless. Topics include an overview of the event; the evaluation methodology; and a synopsis of a range of health, social, and financial support services provided during the event, including oral health screening, examination, and referral. The report analyzes the structure, process, and outcomes of the project; discusses the general demographics of the population served; identifies areas for improvement in the future; and addresses limitations of the analysis.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Community based services, Families, Homeless persons, Oral health, Oregon, Outreach, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Social services

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2008. The characteristics and needs of families experiencing homelessness. Newton, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 9 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the scope, causes, and impact of homelessness on children and families throughout the United States. The fact sheet discusses the number of homeless families, why families are homeless and who these families are; what the experiences of homeless mothers, homeless children, and homeless families are; what can be done; and where to go to learn more.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Poverty

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.