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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (92 total).

Holden E. n.d.. Families in Transition: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland at Baltimore, 39 pp.

Annotation: Families in Transition (FIT) was a comprehensive health care program for homeless children and their families that was a collaborative effort between the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Health Care for the Homeless, Inc. The FIT program provided primary health care services and a wide array of psychosocial services to homeless children and their families. A substantial emphasis was placed upon outreach services that involved linking and collaborating with other service systems in the community. The FIT program developed an innovative model of service delivery that addressed the needs of thousands of homeless children and their families over its five years of operation. Material were developed and information was disseminated that will assist with the development and replication of these types of programs in the future. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-134876.

Keywords: Case Management, Families, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Homelessness, Preventive Health Care

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Children's Aid Society. n.d.. A history of innovation. New York, NY: Children's Aid Society, 1 v.

Annotation: This timeline tracks historic highlights from the Children's Aid Society's (CAS) founding in 1853, tracing changes in poverty in New York City along with the evolution of CAS programs and services. Topics include emigration programs such as the Orphan Train, foster care and adoption programs, lodging houses, industrial schools, convalescent homes, health centers, and farm schools.

Contact: Children's Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (212) 949-4800 Secondary Telephone: (212) 949-4936 Fax: (212) 377-4705 Web Site: http://www.childrensaidsociety.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, History, Homeless persons, New York, Oral health, Poverty, Schools

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2017. Managing chronic health conditions in schools: The role of the school nurse. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the role of school nurses in improving student academic achievement and decreasing absenteeism by helping students with chronic health conditions manage their condition. Topics include providing direct care such as giving children medications, providing case management, and advocating for students and their families to help them get the resources and support they need.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Case management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease management, Elementary schools, Families, Family support services, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Program coordination, Role, School age children, School nurses, Students

National Health Care for the Homeless Council and United Health Care Community & State. 2016. Managed care and homeless populations: Linking the HCH community and MCO partners. Nashville, TN: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief is intended to serve as a resource for managed care entities looking to better understand homelessness, for health professionals seeking to be more aware of managed care and its interests, and for both groups to better understand the common goals each brings to a partnership. The brief includes the health care needs of people who are homeless, describes Health Care for the Homeless projects and the patients receiving care in these venues, a description of managed care, common goals between both entities, and issues that both providers and plans should consider when creating or strengthening partnerships.

Contact: National Health Care for the Homeless Council, P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206-0427, Telephone: (615) 226-2292 Fax: (615) 226-1656 E-mail: council@nhchc.org Web Site: http://www.nhchc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health insurance, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Managed care, Medicaid managed care, Public private partnerships

Pergamit M, Gelatt J, Stratford B, Beckwith S, Martin MC. 2016. Family interventions for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The report includes a summary of common elements of effective interventions and a discussion of gaps in the evidence base. Key implementation lessons and challenges of implementing family intervention models are also included. The appendices contain information abuot the literature review methodology; key informants; and program descriptions including evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, and emerging interventions as well as interventions of interest and those with mixed findings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interventions, Model programs, Youth services

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2016. Friends of Children Healthy People 2020 Grant Program for Chapters: Poverty and child health–Goals, outcomes, and future plans. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 21 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of program summaries describes the approaches of American Academy of Pediatrics' state chapters to develop and implement programs focused on poverty and child health in California, New York City, Oklahoma, and Vermont. Topics include developing and using innovative technologies to address food insecurity, pediatricians promoting food security, ensuring the delivery of health and developmental screening services to young children who are homeless, supporting adolescent parents and their children, and accessing summer meal programs. Each summary includes information about program collaboration, evaluation and measurement, outcomes, barriers and lessons learned, and future plans.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, Developmental screening, Food, Health screening, Healthy People 2020, Homeless persons, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition, Poverty, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

Bassuk EL, DeCandia CJ, Beach CA, Berman F. 2014. America's youngest outcasts. Waltham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 3 items.

Annotation: This report documents the number of homeless children in every state, their well-being, their risk for child homelessness, and state-level planning and policy efforts. The report also ranks the states in four domains, and presents a composite of these domains to rank the states from 1 (best) to 50 (worst). A page about the District of Columbia is also available.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Homeless persons, Housing, Socioeconomic conditions, State surveys, Statistical data

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Fact sheet: Impact of the ACA on vulnerable youth. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet examines implications of the Affordable Care Act for specific populations of adolescents and young adults including those aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. Contents include common characteristics of these populations and the obstacles that could prevent them from securing health insurance coverage. Topics include state Medicaid expansion and complexities of the application and enrollment process. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

English A, Scott J, Park MJ. 2014. Implementing the Affordable Care Act: How much will it help vulnerable adolescents and young adults?. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores the implications of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for adolescents and young adults who are aging out of foster care, involved in juvenile and criminal justice systems, or homeless. For each group, the brief provides an overview of demographic characteristics and health status, and discusses access to health care and health insurance before and after the ACA. The brief concludes with a discussion of common themes and upcoming challenges for the three populations. An accompanying fact sheet summarizes the ACA's implications for these groups. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Barriers, Eligibility, Enrollment, Foster care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Homeless persons, Juvenile delinquents, Medicaid, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Young adults

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children. 2013. Early care and education for young children experiencing homelessness. Greensboro, NC: National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE; National Association for the Education of Homeless Children, 14 pp. (Best practices in homeless education brief series)

Annotation: This brief provides information and suggests best practices to increase the enrollment of and provision of services to families with young children experiencing homelessness. It presents an overview of the problem; describes legislation and programs that support homeless children; and explains how schools, service provider agencies, and early childhood programs can collaborate to help overcome the barriers hat separate young homeless children and families from the support they need. Included is a table listing programs that include provisions for homeless children, including the services provided, eligibility, and contact information.

Contact: National Center for Homeless Education, SERVE, P.O. Box 5367, Greensboro, NC 27435, Telephone: (800) 308-2145 Fax: (336) 315-7457 E-mail: homeless@serve.org Web Site: http://center.serve.org/nche/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early intervention, Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Young children

National Collaboration for Youth. 2012. Building a brighter future: An essential agenda for America's young people. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Collaboration for Youth, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report presents federal public policy recommendations that are intended to improve children's health, safety, and well-being, and improve the education system with the goals of saving money, strengthening families, producing a more educated work force, and laying a base for America that will thrive into the next century. Topics covered include early childhood, education, after-school and summer programs, child welfare, healthy children and adolescents, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, runaway and homeless adolescents, adolescent services, and adolescent employment.

Contact: National Human Services Assembly, 1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 347-2080 Fax: (202) 393-4517 E-mail: wowens@nassembly.org Web Site: http://www.nassembly.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, After school programs, Child health, Early childhood education, Education, Employment, Homelessness, Juvenile delinquents, Poverty, Prevention, Public policy, Runaways, Safety

McCoy-Roth M, Mackintosh BB, Murphey D. 2012. When the bough breaks: The effects of homelessness on young children. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Early childhood highlights)

Annotation: This brief highlights the effects of homelessness on children and notes several policies and practices that could help mitigate negative outcomes. With a particular emphasis on young children (under age six), the report discusses trends in homelessness, the negative effects of homelessness on child development, the importance of early childhood care and education opportunities for homeless children, and the barriers to using early learning programs that homeless families face, and implications for policy and practice. The brief also provides state by state comparisons of performance in serving homeless children compiled by the Campaign to End Child Homelessness.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development, Homelessness, Policy development, Program improvement, Trends, Young children

Zero to Three. 2012. Starting life without a home: Supporting homeless families in nuturing their infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 1 video (7 min., 34 sec.).

Annotation: This video outlines a Congressional briefing held February 16, 2012 to discuss the developmental impacts and needs of homeless infants and toddlers in America. Topics include outcomes for homeless children, statistical data on homeless children and their families, the impact of unresolved stress for families and their children, as well as a review of programs that work in early intervention.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child development, Children, Early intervention, Homelessness, Infant health, Young children

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

Hwang, A. 2012. Supporting Pan Asian Runaway and Homeless Youth: Special Projects of Regional and National Significance—[Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Asian Media Access, 33 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes a project to provide Asian American & Pacific Islander (AAPI) runaway and homeless youth in Minnesota culturally-appropriate health services, through RICE (Reaching Immigrants with Care & Education). The 2007-2012 project included street outreach, health education, prevention and intervention services designed for AAPI street youth, aged between 10-18 years old, with a special focus on Hmong runaway girls who bear highest risk of being subjected to sexual abuse. Report contents include a description of the project and realtionship to Title V maternal and child health programs, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, dissemination and utilization of results, as well as future plans and sustainability. The appendix includes the evaluation report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Asian Americans, Final reports, Health services delivery, Homeless persons, Outreach, Pacific Islanders, Runaways, Youth

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2012. Fostering healthy families through stable housing: The role of the health care system. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 3 pp. (Fact sheet: Women, children and adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses where children experiencing housing instability and homelessness access health care and what health plans and health plan foundations can do to support healthy, affordable housing. It also examines what health plans and health plan foundations are already doing in this area. Additional contents include information about children in the foster care system and a list of resources. A webinar on this topic, held on July 26, 2012, is also available from the website.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Foster children, Foundations, Health care systems, Health plans, Homeless persons, Housing, Multimedia

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2011. Leading change: A plan for SAMHSA's roles and actions 2011-2014. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report describes eight strategic initiatives that the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has identified to guide its work through 2014. For each initiative, background is presented, along with an issue statement and specific goals and objectives. The strategic initiatives discussed include: (1) prevention of substance abuse and mental illness; (2) trauma and justice; (3) military families; (4) health care reform implementation; (5) housing and homelessness; (6) heath information technology; (7) data, outcomes, and quality; and (8) public awareness and support.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge (hipping charges may apply); also available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health care reform, Homelessness, Housing, Information, Initiatives, Mental health, Military, Outcomes, Prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Statistical data, Strategic plans, Substance abuse, Trauma

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.