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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (35 total).

Mailloux S. n.d.. Improved Prenatal Care Utilization and Birth Outcome Project [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 80 pp.

Annotation: This project surveyed 3000 postpartum Massachusetts women in order to identify barriers to, components of, and levels of participation in prenatal care, and to collect data on the social context of women's lives during pregnancy. Various interventions with high risk women at four demonstration sites were evaluated and compared. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-144236.

Keywords: High risk pregnancy, Hispanics, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Keith J. n.d.. Family-Focused Strategy for Reducing Premature and Unprotected Sexual Activity Among Minority Youth in School-Based Health Clinics [Final report]. Dallas, TX: Dallas County Hospital District, 26 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate effective intervention strategies for the 10–15 year age group that can be carried out within a school-based comprehensive health care system to reduce the occurrence of premature and unprotected sexual intercourse in adolescents. More than 300 10-year-old children and their parents enrolled to receive annual health maintenance evaluations and a series of activities to enhance parent-child communication, parental knowledge of adolescent social and sexual development, and problem-solving and decision-making skills. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133977.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Decision Making Skills, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Hispanics, Minority Groups, Parent Child Interaction, Parent Child Relationship, Preventive Health Care Education, School Dropouts, School Health Programs, School Health Services, Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Palfrey J, Rosen-Reynoso M, Ogilus N, Foley S . 2013. Reducing health disparities for Hispanic children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: National Center for Community-Based Services, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the problems that Hispanic families of children and youth with special health care needs and their providers confront, explore innovative solutions and suggest a number of areas that warrant further policy consideration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, c/o Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA 02125, Telephone: (617) 287-4370 E-mail: communitybasedsrvcs@umb.edu Web Site: http://communitybasedservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Hispanics, Youth

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2011. Conozca las preguntas (Know the questions). Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

Annotation: This web site offers tips to help Spanish speakers communicate effectively with their health professionals. The web site features information on how to develop a list of questions to ask and downloadable public service announcements from a national campaign designed to improve health and health care among Hispanics. A special web site for mobile phone users is also available, offering biweekly tips on talking with doctors sent via text-messaging. A similar English-language web site is also available.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Federal initiatives, Health education, Health services, Hispanics, Multimedia, Public awareness campaigns, Quality assurance, Safety, Spanish language materials

Minino AM. 2010. Mortality among teenagers aged 12-19 years: United States, 1999-2006. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 37)

Annotation: This data brief presents information about deaths to adolescents (ages 12-19) in the United States from 1999 to 2006. The brief discusses the risk of dying for this population, leading causes of death, and the cause of death accounting for high death rates among non-Hispanic black male adolescents.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent death, Adolescent males, Adolescent mortality, Blacks, High risk adolescents, Hispanics, Prevention, Racial factors, Sex factors

Grantmakers in Health. 2009. It's not just black and white: Health disparities in other racial and ethnic groups. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 3 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue focus highlights disparities and health concerns among Hispanics, Asian Americans, and American Indians and provides examples of ways that philanthropic organizations can support efforts to improve health status and outcomes of these populations. Challenges and future considerations are also discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Asian Americans, Ethnic factors, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanics, Racial factors

Acevedo-Garcia D, McArdle N, Osypuk TL, Lefkowitz B, Krimgold BK. 2007. Children left behind: How metropolitan areas are failing America's children. Boston, MA: Harvard School of Public Health; Washington, DC: Center for the Advancement of Health, 42 pp., plus chartbook.

Annotation: This report describes the difficulties faced by children--particularly black and Hispanic children--living in metropolitan areas. The report conclusions are drawn from diversitydata.org, a new Web site profiling U.S. metropolitan areas, which are home to 80 percent of the nation's schools. The report focuses on the 100 metropolitan areas with the largest child populations. The report includes a detailed summary, which discusses background, findings, policy implications, levers for action, and models that work. References are included. The remainder of the report is a chartbook consisting of figures.

Contact: Harvard University, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, Telephone: (617) 495-1000 Web Site: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child development, Children, Education, Hispanics, Income factors, Low income groups, Racial factors, Schools, Statistical data, Urban populations

Hernandez DJ, Macartney SE. [2006]. Measuring social disparities: A modified approach to the Index of Child Well-Being (CWI) for race-ethnic, immigrant-generation, and socioeconomic groups with new results for whites, blacks, and Hispanics. [NewYork, NY]: Foundation for Child Development, 16 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a methodology that measures disparities across children in different ethnic groups (white, African Americans, and Hispanics), including future trends in disparities.The methodology makes it possible to show whether disparities have been eliminated or how much change would be required to eliminate disparities. Topics include (1) methodology for the current Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), (2) modified methodology for special racial and ethnic groups, (3) selected results using the modified methodology, (4) magnitudes and trends in racial-ethnic disparities, (5) trends in the black-white CWI disparity, (6) trends in the Hispanic-white CWI disparity, and (7) conclusions. References are included.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Minority groups, Children, Ethnic factors, Hispanics, Racial factors, Trends, Whites, Blacks

Doty MM, Holmgren AL. 2004. Unequal access: Insurance instability among low-income workers and minorities. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, Task Force on the Future of Health Insurance, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on low-income adults' and minorities' access to health insurance. It reveals that uninsurance rates among these populations are higher than previously thought. The issue brief, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue and then discusses the following topics: (1) low-income adults -- especially Hispanics -- have unstable coverage, (2) most low-income adults work, but even stable jobs leave them uninsured, (3) insurance instability undermines access to care and use of preventive services, and (4) summary and policy implications. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the brief. The back page of the brief includes a description of the methodology of the study described.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Employment, Hispanics, Low income groups, Minority groups, Prevention services, Public policy, Uninsured persons

Deinard A. 2002. Does Education Limit Lead Burden?: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota School of Medicine, 51 pp.

Annotation: Lead abatement is a costly and disruptive secondary prevention procedure that benefits only those who live in the abated home. Primary prevention interventions—which may be less expensive and reach more people—are necessary. This study assessed the efficacy of a community-based, intensive, culturally specific educational intervention for the primary prevention of lead burden. The study hypothesized that lead levels of children whose mothers received the intensive education will remain lower than those of children whose mothers receive basic education, and that mothers receiving the intervention will perform better on knowledge-based tests than will mothers who do not. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107491.

Keywords: American Indians, Asians-All others, Blacks, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, Infants, Lead Poisoning Prevention, Lead Poisoning Screening, MCH Research, Newborn infants, Parent Education, Parents, Peer Counseling, Preschool children, Research, Toddlers

Urdaneta ML, Livingston J, Aguilar MJ, Enciso V, Kaye CI. 2002. Understanding Mexican American cultural beliefs and traditional healing practices: A guide for genetic service providers on the U.S.-Mexico border. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pediatrics, 153 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended for use as an aid to help genetic service providers better understand their client populations and reduce barriers to the provision of genetic services. The guide is geared for health professionals both with and without experience caring for Mexican Americans. The guide is divided into eight main sections: (1) who are Mexican Americans, (2) cultural values and beliefs and their relationship to health behaviors, (3) what is curanderismo, (4) Mexican American folk beliefs regarding genetic and other conditions, (5) client perceptions of genetic services and barriers to care, (6) cultural competence and genetic practice, (7) tool kit, and (8) supplement. The guide also includes a bibliography. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 567-7000 Web Site: http://www.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Genetic services, Health behavior, Health personnel, Hispanics, MCH research, Mexican Americans, Resource materials

Telleen S. 2001. Use of Child Health Services by Hispanic Families: [Final report]. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, 59 pp.

Annotation: This study examined the influence of social context and acculturation on use of health services for preschool Mexican-American and Puerto Rican children in a major Midwestern city. Questions about health practices and service utilization were based on "Healthy People 2000" objectives for Hispanic children, including improving nutrition and reducing asthma morbidity; dental caries; high lead levels; and injuries/deaths from firearms, child abuse, motor vehicle crashes, and residential fires. The influence of health service availability, provider outreach, and mediating variables (e.g., knowledge of health services/practices, parental beliefs/attitudes, sense of control over their children's health) were examined. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106924.

Keywords: Access to Health, Care, Cultural Sensitivity, Hispanics, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Huberman H. 2001. Alternatives for Developmental Screening in Primary Care: [Final report]. New York, NY: Medical and Health Research Association of New York City, 42 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this randomized clinical control trial was to examine the feasibility of three different approaches to the periodic screening of at-risk children within a public health agency/primary care clinic context: 1) Traditional provider-administered Denver II screenings; 2) mailed Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) only; or 3) mailed ASQs plus monthly parenting newsletters and toys. Six hypotheses were tested: 1) The percentage of initial screening by ASQ will be equal to or better than the rate of initial assessment by providers; 2) patient retention will be equal or higher in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1; 3) the percentage of ongoing screening in group 3 will be greater than in group 2; 4) for the same child who has had both a Denver II and a one-time ASQ, there will be concordance on suspected delay; 5) with ongoing screening, cross-group comparisons will show that the rate of "suspected delay" screening in the ASQ groups will be equal to or greater than in group 1; and 6) certain subgroups (defined by demographic and/or risk factors) may respond better than others to an ASQ approach. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106923.

Keywords: Blacks, Children with Special Health care Needs, Developmental Evaluation, Developmental Screening, Early Childhood Development, Early Intervention, Hispanics, Infants, Low Income Population, Low Income Population, MCH Research, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Research, State Programs, Toddlers

Hovell M. 2001. ETS and Smoking Control in Families: A WIC Trial: [Final report]. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, 40 pp.

Annotation: This study tested a behavioral counseling intervention designed to reduce environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure among babies under age 1. Specific aims were to (1) determine the effects of clinic-based behavioral counseling on ETS exposure among babies of low socioeconomic status (SES), as measured by mothers' reports and babies' urine cotinine analyses; (2) validate parent-reported ETS exposure measures using urine cotinine assays and environmental nicotine monitors; (3) determine the effects of participation on the mothers' smoking rate and the proportion of mothers who quit smoking; (4) explore health outcome measures associated with decreased ETS exposure; and (5) identify possible determinants of ETS exposure. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-101955.

Keywords: Counseling, Family Environment, Hispanics, Hispanics, Infant Morbidity, Infants, Infants, MCH Research, Research, Smoking During Pregnancy

Neumark-Sztainer D. 2001. Factors Associated with Nutritional Intake in Adolescents: [Final report]. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, 63 pp.

Annotation: The main research questions addressed by this project were as follows: (1) Are adolescents meeting the Healthy People 2000 nutrition health status and risk reduction objectives? Which groups of adolescents are at greatest risk for not meeting these objectives and need to be targeted for intervention? (2) What are the direct and indirect overall contributions of socioenvironmental, personal, and behavioral factors to the explained variance in nutritional intake and weight gain status? Are similar associations found among adolescents from different socioeconomic status (SES), age, gender, and ethnic groups? (3) Which specific socioenvironmental, personal, and behavioral measures are associated with the targeted behaviors outlined in the Healthy People 2000 nutrition health status and risk reduction objectives? Are similar associations found among adolescents from different SES, grade, gender, and ethnic groups? [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-107493.

Keywords: Adolescent Nutrition, Adolescents, Adolescents, American Indians, American Indians, Asians, Asians, Blacks, Blacks, Body Composition, Hispanics, Hispanics, MCH Research, Nutrition, Pacific Islanders, Pacific Islanders, Prenatal Screening, Research, Surveys

Urdaneta ML, Aguilar M, Livingston J, Gonzales-Bogran S, Kaye CI. 2001. Understanding Mexican American cultural beliefs and traditional healing practices: A guide for genetic service providers in South Texas. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Pediatrics, 115 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is intended to help reduce cultural barriers to the provision of genetic services in South Texas, includes information from interviews with Mexican-American Medicaid clients, traditional healers, and genetic services providers, as well as information from the literature. The guide is divided into eight main sections: (1) who are Mexican Americans, (2) cultural values and beliefs and their relationship to health behaviors, (3) what is curanderismo, (4) Mexican American folk beliefs regarding genetic and other conditions, (5) cultural competence and genetic practice, (6) barriers to obtaining genetic services, and (7) other cultural beliefs regarding health and illness. A tool kit at the end of the guide contains supplemental information and resources. The guide also includes a bibliography. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 567-7000 Web Site: http://www.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural barriers, Cultural beliefs, Cultural factors, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Folk medicine, Genetic services, Hispanics, MCH research, Medicaid, Mexican Americans, Resource materials, Texas

Alarcon O. 2000. Social Context of Puerto Rican Child Health and Growth: [Final report]. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, 60 pp.

Annotation: The specific aims of this study were to: (1) Describe the life patterns of children of Puerto Rican origin living on the U.S. mainland, taking into consideration variations in socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and color; (2) describe Puerto Rican children's experiences with migration and the impact of migration on the interconnected contexts of their family, peer groups, school, neighborhood, and ethnic community, as well as the majority culture; and (3) examine the relationships between migration, social contexts, and Puerto Rican children's development, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106925.

Keywords: Data Collection, Hispanics–Puerto Ricans, MCH Research, Minority Groups, Parents, Puerto Ricans, Research, School-age children

Menard S. 1999. San Antonio Biethnic Children's Blood Pressure Study: [Final report]. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 38 pp.

Annotation: This study evaluated blood pressures in biethnic (non-Hispanic white and Mexican-American) children, kindergarten through 12th grade, using the auscultatory method (with the cuff selected by the American Heart Association recommendation) and the oscillometric method. Thee study resulted in normative blood pressure (BP) standards for both methods, produced conversion factors between BP levels obtained by the two methods; provided, for the first time, reliable normative BP levels in Mexican-American children and provided information on ethnic differences, in BP levels; and helped to determine relationships between BP levels and other variables such as age, gender, and weight. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106929.

Keywords: Blood Pressure Determination, Hispanics, Hypertension, MCH Research, Mexicans, Research

Menard S. 1999. San Antonio Triethnic Children's Blood Pressure Study: [Final report]. San Antonio, TX: University of Texas, 38 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study was to develop normative BP data for African-American children and adolescents and to combine those data with data from a previous study in order to acquire normative BP data from three ethnic groups: Mexican Americans, African Americans, and whites. The study evaluated blood pressure (BP) in African-American children, using auscultatory and oscillometric methods. Anthropometric measures, triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness measures, three BP measures for each method of measurement (in a rotational sequence), and a dietary history were obtained for each student. A mean BP, standard deviation, and percentile values for each group by age, ethnicity, and gender were calculated for auscultatory and Dinamap values. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106929.

Keywords: Blacks, Blood Pressure Determination, Hispanics, Hispanics, MCH Research, Mexicans, Mexicans, Research

Korenbrot C. 1998. Indicators of Maternity Care in Medicaid Managed Care: [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, 51 pp.

Annotation: This research study aimed to: 1) develop potential indicators for maternity ambulatory care, incorporating the role of nutrition, psychosocial, and health education services; 2) test the validity of the indicators for their associations with poor health outcomes and their ability to predict poor health outcomes; and 3) test whether the indicators vary for women, with respect to different provider settings for prenatal care and different payer sources of care. An expert panel developed indicators and rated the variables proposed as indicators or risk adjusters. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-145666.

Keywords: Blacks, Enabling Services, Hispanics-All others, Hispanics–Mexican Americans, Low Income Population, MCH Research, Medicaid Managed Care, Pregnant women (not otherwise defined as adolescents), Prenatal Care, Research

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.