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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (209 total).

Driscoll AK, Osterman MJK. 2018. Maternal characteristics of prenatal WIC receipt in the United States, 2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief; no. 298)

Annotation: This report describes prenatal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) receipt in the United States in 2016 by state and by maternal age, race and Hispanic origin, and education. For each topic, key points are provided, and bar graphs illustrate statistical information.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Educational factors, Hispanic Americans, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition programs, Pregnant women, Prenatal nutriton, Racial factors, Statistical data, WIC program

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Health and health care for all: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

American College of Rheumatology, Lupus Foundation of America. 2017. Be Fierce. Take Control™. Atlanta, GA: American College of Rheumatology; Washington, DC: Lupus Foundation of America, multiple items.

Annotation: This public health campaign website was launched with the goal of educating and empowering young African American and Latino women (including those ages 15-18), who are most at-risk for developing lupus, to be aware of it signs and symptoms. The campaign uses the web, social media, digital advertising, and audience engagement to reach young women and educate them about the signs and symptoms of lupus. The campaign website also provides tools and resources such as the Lupus Foundation of America’s “Could it Be Lupus?” interactive questionnaire so those with possible symptoms can learn how to take that next step and talk to their health care provider.

Contact: Lupus Foundation of America, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 349-1155 Secondary Telephone: (800) 558-0121 Fax: (202) 349-1156 Web Site: http://www.lupus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, African Americans, Autoimmune diseases, Early intervention programs, Empowerment, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Lupus erythematosus, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Risk factors, Self care, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health. 2016-. Resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health, irregular.

Annotation: The Resource Guide to Health Disparities Resources is an easy-to-use guide published by the Office of Minority Health. This guide lists phone numbers and addresses to OMH regional coordinators, Public Health Service minority liaisons, Federal information centers and clearinghouses, and national organizations, categorized by target population. There is also a section on minority colleges.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Asian Americans, Asian language materials, Blacks, Directories, Federal agencies, Health services, Hispanic Americans, Minority health, Organizations, Pacific Islanders, Public health services, Resource centers, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, State agencies

O'Hare WP, Mayol-Garcia Y, Wildsmith E, Torres A. 2016. The invisible ones: How Latino children are left out of our Nation's census count. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends Hispanic Institute and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials Educational Fund,

Annotation: This report identifies issues associated with the undercount of young Hispanic children in the U.S. Census and provides recommendations to improve the accuracy of the count in the next census. Contents include information about the net undercount of young Latino children by state and by county, drivers of the undercount, and strategies to reduce it by 2020. Topics include identifying and pursuing research questions, developing networks that will reach households with young children, raising awareness among stakeholders, targeting outreach to locations with concentrations of Latino families, leveraging government programs that serve children and existing partnerships with local organizations, and reaching out to health professionals and families of preschoolers.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Hispanic Americans, Neighborhoods, Networking, Outreach, Participation, Public private partnerships, Research, Schools, Young children

Wilson K. 2015. Reducing health insurance inequities among Latino families raising children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of policies, including provisions of the Affordable Care Act, that help reduce the uninsurance rate among Latinos and narrow inequities in coverage. Topics include efforts to address coverage inequities experienced by Latino families as a whole and also those of Latino children with complex care needs for whom uninsurance may be particularly damaging to health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Ethnic groups, Families, Health care reform, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Special health care needs, Young adults

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2015. Promoting healthy choices and community changes: An e-learning program for promotores de salud. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This course for promotores de salud (community health workers) comprises four units about understanding healthy choices, helping people make healthy choices, understanding community change, and helping people make community change. The course can by used by individuals or by groups of individuals. Contents include a video introduction; quizzes; stories; examples; and handouts that summarize each unit including key points, definitions, and questions to consider and discuss. Users can choose to answer the questions at the end of each unit and print a certificate of completion or receive a certificate by email. The units can be completed in sequence or in any order and in whole or in part. The course is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health workers, Decision making, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Social change, Spanish language materials, Training

Barrett M, Breen N, Casale C, Fingar K, Gomez M, Heslin K, Moy E, Velasco J, Wilson-Frrederick S. 2015. 2014 national healthcare quality and disparities report: Chartbook on Hispanic health care. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 116 pp.

Annotation: This report commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Black and Minority Health (Heckler Report), highlights progress for Hispanics on priorities of the Heckler Report, summarizes trends in health care for Hispanic populations related to access to health care and National Quality Strategy priorities, and presents information on health care received by residents of the U.S.-Mexico border. Topics include cancer; diabetes; HIV/AIDS; injury prevention; maternal, infant, and child health; mental health; oral health; and respiratory diseases.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Ethnic groups, Health care disparities, Hispanic Americans, Measures, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, Rural health, Trends

Salud America!. 2015. Health navigators in elementary schools increase Latinos' access to health services. [San Antonio, TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research], 8 pp. (Health equity success story)

Annotation: This document describes a partnership model between a local health department and a school district to eliminate barriers to health care among Latinos by embedding bilingual, bicultural health navigators in elementary schools. Topics include efforts to build awareness, frame the issue, educate and mobilize partners, debate and frame policy, make change happen, and implement an equitable and sustainable program. A video is also available.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Hispanic Americans, Access to health care, Coordination, Culturally competent services, Elementary schools, Financing, Medicaid, Model programs, Parents, Program descriptions, School districts, School health services, State programs, Students, Teachers

National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health. 2014. Women of color health data book (4th ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, Office of Research on Women's Health, 98 pp.

Annotation: This document is intended for use by policy makers and advocates of women's health issues. It addresses issues of minority women's health, covering Native Americans, Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, with special attention to adolescent and elderly women. Information is presented about life expectancy, major causes of death, behavior and lifestyles, risk factors, prenatal health care services, access to health insurance and services, and morbidity and mortality. The document includes numerous graphs, and a list of references. It concludes with recommendations to improve the health of women of color.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-4000 Secondary Telephone: (301) 402-9612 Fax: (301) 496-0017 E-mail: NIHInfo@OD.NIH.GOV Web Site: http://www.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH 98-4247.

Keywords: Adolescent health, American Indians, Asian Americans, Blacks, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Morbidity, Older adults, Risk factors, Statistics, Women's health

National Alliance for Hispanic Health. 2014. About our health: Results from the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos. Washington, DC: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 41 pp. (Hispanic community heath study)

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to document the health of Hispanics/Latinos in selected United States locations. All content is presented in English and Spanish and includes a description of the study and participants and results across the field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, IL; and San Diego, CA) in the following areas: asthma, oral health (based on a dental exam), depression, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and health habits. Tips to improve health are also included.

Contact: National Alliance for Hispanic Health, 1501 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-1401, Telephone: (202) 387-5000 Secondary Telephone: (866) 783-2645 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.hispanichealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health behavior, Health promotion, Health status, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Research, Spanish language materials

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Strategies for behavioral health organizations to promote new health opportunities in Latino and Hispanic communities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp.

McDaniel M, Popkin SJ, Berman J, Barahona P, Saxena P, Quint D, Teach SJ. 2014. Making sense of childhood asthma: Lessons for building a better system of care. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key findings from a qualitative exploratory study about asthma care for African American and Latino children ages 4-14 from families with low incomes in Washington, DC. Topics include poor housing, the lack of health professionals in low-income neighborhoods, the gap between acute and chronic care, barriers to asthma management, and lessons for improving asthma care and children's asthma outcomes. The appendices contain information about the study sample, recruitment, lessons learned, and focus group and one-on-one interview discussion guides.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Blacks, Children, Chronic diseases and disabilities, Critical care, Disease management, Hispanic Americans, Local initiatives, Low income groups, Pediatric care, Program improvement, Research

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2014. Overweight and obesity among Latino youths. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 5 pp.

Moore KA, Caal S, Rojas A, Lawner EK. 2014. Child Trends' evaluation of the Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors program: Executive summary and discussion brief. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends Hispanic Institute, 6 pp.

Palfrey JS, Ogilus N, Rosen-Reynoso M. 2014. Community health workers and children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an environmental scan to identify programs that are engaging community health workers (CHWs) and/or community outreach strategies to enhance services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) from Latino families. The report describes disparities in access to and quality of health services for CSHCN of Latino backgrounds, interventions to decrease racial and ethnic disparities, CHW deployment, and what CHWs can accomplish. Additional contents include the methodology and criteria for the scan, descriptions of exemplary programs, and a discussion of principles and opportunities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the HSC Foundation]

Contact: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, c/o Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA 02125, Telephone: (617) 287-4370 E-mail: communitybasedsrvcs@umb.edu Web Site: http://communitybasedservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children with special health care needs, Community health services, Community health workers, Competence, HIspanic Americans, Medical home, Model programs, Quality assurance, Sociocultural factors

Murphey D, Guzman L, Torres A. 2014. America's Hispanic children: Gaining ground, looking forward. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 35 pp.

GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications. 2014. Hispanics open up about oral health care. [Springfield, IL]: Hispanic Dental Association, 1 p.

Annotation: This infographic presents findings from a national survey of Hispanic and other adults in the United States. Topics include barriers to accessing oral health care that Hispanics face and awareness about key oral health issues.

Contact: Hispanic Dental Association, 3910 South IH-35, Suite 245, Austin, TX 78704, Telephone: (512) 904-0252 Web Site: http://www.hdassoc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Dental insurance, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health status, Hispanic Americans, National surveys, Oral health, Statistical data

National Council of La Raza. (2013). Latino Kids Data Explorer. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza,

Annotation: This database is a user-friendly tool that provides data on Latino children in the United States. As an update and expansion of NCLR’s 2010 publication America’s Future: Latino Child Well-Being in Numbers and Trends, the Data Explorer offers 27 national- and state-level indicators of Latino child well-being, including demographic, health, education, housing, income, and juvenile justice variables. The data are available by age group (0–2, 0–4, 0–8, 0–17) and include time trend and racial/ethnic comparisons.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Data, Demography, Hispanic Americans, Juvenile justice, Socioeconomic status

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . 2013. Health snapshot: Hispanic adolescents in the United States. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health , (E-updates)

Annotation: This website provides information about Hispanic adolescents in the United States related to health care coverage, adolescent pregnancy, educational attainment, mental health, substance abuse, and weight. For each topic, links to information and programs are included. Background information about this population is also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Cultural factors, Educational attainment, Mental health, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Programs, Substance abuse

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.