Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (28 total).

National Activity Plan Alliance, Secular Changes in Physical Education Exposure Ad Hoc Committee. 2016. Secular changes in physical education attendance among U.S. high school students: YRBS 1991–2013. Columbia, SC: National Activity Plan Alliance, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document reports findings from a study to determine the extent to which school-based physical education attendance has changed among U.S. high school students over the past two decades. The study used data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System for the period 1991 to 2013 to assess changes in the percentage of U.S. high school students reporting individual days per week of physical education attendance, any physical education attendance, daily physical education attendance, and the mean number of days of physical education attendance during an average school week.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: High school students, Participation, Physical education, Schools, Trends

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. [2015]. Bullying and absenteeism: Information for state and local education agencies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief for state and local education agencies presents findings from the peer-reviewed literature on associations between in-person and electronic bullying victimization and missing school because of safety concerns among students in high school. The brief also describes what education agencies can do to prevent bullying. Topics include sharing information about potential education-related consequences of bullying, addressing electronic bullying beyond school boundaries, responding to co-occurring types of bullying, and opportunities for collaboration with health professionals.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Collaboration, High school students, Injury prevention, Research, School attendance, State agencies, Violence prevention

Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey, Center for Sex Education. 2015–. School health sex education kit. Morristown, NJ: Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey, Center for Sex Education, multiple items.

Annotation: This kit of 10 manuals provides lesson plans on sexuality topics for students in grades 3–12. Contents include the following titles: Changes, Changes, Changes: Great Methods for Puberty Education; Game On! The Ultimate Sexuality Education Gaming Guide; Great Mentoring: Positive Conversations with Young People about Sexual Decisions; Let's Erase Bullying; Making Sense of Abstinence; Positive Images: Teaching About Contraception and Sexual Health; Sex Ed 101; Sex Ed in the Digital Age; Teaching Safer Sex; and Unequal Partners: Teaching about Power, Consent, and Healthy Relationships.

Contact: Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern New Jersey, Center for Sex Education, 196 Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, NJ 07960, Telephone: (973) 387-5161 E-mail: info@sexedstore.com Web Site: http://www.sexedcenter.org $499 (full set); manuals also available individually.

Keywords: Curricula, Elementary education, Elementary schools, High schools, Middle schools, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Students, Teaching

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Rhode Island Department of Health. 2014. Oral health concerns and dental care among Rhode Island middle and high school students, 2013. Providence, RI: Rhode Island Department of Health, 4 pp. (Rhode Island data brief)

Annotation: This form for school oral health programs includes information to share with parents about their child’s oral health screening. The form includes space for program staff to insert the child’s school, name, grade, and classroom and whether the child has no obvious oral health problems, problems that should be evaluated by a dentist, or needs for immediate care by a dentist. Space for notes as well as the screener’s name and screening date is included.

Contact: Rhode Island Department of Health, Three Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908, Telephone: (401) 222-5960 Web Site: http://www.health.state.ri.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Health care utilization, Health status, High schools, Middle schools, Oral health, Rhode Island, School age children, State programs, State surveys, Statistical data, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. Physical education profiles, 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 147 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes physical activity and physical education policies and practices of secondary schools (middle schools, high schools) across 26 jurisdictions (18 states, 6 large urban school districts, 1 territory, and 1 tribe). Topics include requirements, curricula and standards, instruction, student assessment, school-based intramural sports programs or physical activity clubs, teacher qualifications, and professional development.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curricula, High schools, Inservice training, Middle schools, Physical activity, Physical education, School age children, Sports, Standards, Students, Teachers

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Basslet EJ, Chriqui JF, Stagg K, Schneider LM, Infusino K, Asada Y. 2013. Controlling junk food and the bottom line: Case studies of schools successfully implementing strong nutrition standards for competitive foods and beverages. Chicago, IL: Illinois Public Health Institute, 127 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights case studies from middle schools and high schools in eight diverse districts across the country that illustrate ideas and strategies to help district and school-level decisionmakers successfully implement stronger nutrition standards for competitive foods. The report presents findings from a study of policies and practices related primarily to food-service accounts.

Contact: Illinois Public Health Institute, 924 West Washington Boulevard, Suite 405, Mailbox 10, Chicago, IL 60607, Telephone: (312) 850-4744 Fax: (312) 850-4040 Web Site: http://iphionline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Costs, High schools, Managed competition, Middle schools, Nutrition, Policy analysis, School age children, Snacks, Standards, Students

Rhode Island Department of Health, Center for Health Data and Analysis. 2012. Youth at risk: 2011 Rhode Island high school health risks. [Providence, RI]: Rhode Island Department of Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief examines risk behaviors among high school students in Rhode Island during 2007-2011 to determine whether or not these behaviors had improved or worsened over that time period and if there were differences in select behaviors according to grade level. The authors focused on 24 measures in eight domains of risk (violence, mental health, tobacco, alcohol, drugs, sex, injury, and weight), using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey of public high-school students nationwide on the major causes of disease and injury morbidity and mortality. Figures and tables display changes between 2007 and 2011 and compare health risks by grade level in 2011.

Contact: Rhode Island Department of Health, Three Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908, Telephone: (401) 222-5960 Web Site: http://www.health.state.ri.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, High school students, National surveys, Rhode Island, Risk factors, State initiatives, State surveys, Trends, Youth

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services. 2012. Preventing suicide: A toolkit for high schools. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 229 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is intended to help high schools, school districts, and their partners design and implement strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health among students. Topics include getting started, helping at-risk students, after a suicide, staff education and training, parent and guardian education and outreach, student programs, and screening. Tools are included for each topic. Additional resources and handouts are also presented.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4669.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Education, High school students, Outreach, Programs, Resource materials, School health, Screening, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Training

Rand Center for Domestic and International Health Security. 2011. Helping children cope with violence and trauma: A school-based program that works [Upd. ed.]. Santa Monica, CA: Rand Health, 7 pp. (Research highlights)

Annotation: This updated fact sheet describes a continuing school-based program implemented in the Los Angeles Unified School District that was designed to help children cope with violence. Students in the program lived in largely Hispanic neighborhoods. The fact sheet provides background about the problems faced by children exposed to violence, discusses the way the program was developed and the program's results, and offers conclusions. Statistical information is presented in figures in the fact sheet.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Child mental health, Children, Coping, Families, High risk children, Hispanic Americans, Low income groups, Parents, Programs, Schools, Students, Violence, Witnesses

Land KC. 2011. The 2011 FCD-CWI special focus report on trends in violent bullying victimization in school contexts for 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, 1991-2009. Durham, NC: Foundation for Child Development and the Child and Youth Well-Being Index (FCD-CWI) Project at Duke University, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses questions about whether the recent upsurge in school bullying in the United States is historically unique in recent American history and about the relative risk of bully victimization in students with different sociodemographic, contextual, and behavioral characteristics and the variation of these risks over time. The report also addresses questions about the effects of anti-bullying efforts. The report analyzes trends and changes in the prevalence of serious forms (physically threatening, violent, injurious) of school bullying victimization among middle school and high school students over time and in differential exposure of demographic, social, and economic groups to school bullying.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child behavior, Economic factors, High school students, Middle school students, Prevention, Research, School violence, Trends, Victims, Violence

DeSimone JS. 2010. Binge drinking and sex in high school. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16132)

Annotation: This paper estimates the impact of binge drinking on sexual activity among a nationally representative sample of high school students during the 1990s and 2000s. It includes a discussion of the data used in the research from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS) -- administrated every odd year since 1991 -- and the results of the data analysis. Tables present control variable definitions and means, together with data that correlates binge drinking with sexuality activity, birth control use, and other variables.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Data, Data analysis, High school students, National surveys, Risk taking, Sexual behavior

Adelman HS, Taylor L. 2010. Mental health in schools: Engaging learners, preventing problems, and improving schools. [Thousand Oaks, CA]: Corwin , 310 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a new approach to school-based mental health with the goal of better serving students, maximizing resources, and promoting academic performance. The book discusses how educators can effectively coordinate internal and external resources to support a healthy school environment and to help students who are at risk overcome barriers to learning. Topics include an overview of the history and current state of school mental health programs, strategies for effective school-based initiatives, and a call to action for high-quality mental health programming in public schools.

Contact: Corwin Press, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, Telephone: (805) 499-9734 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-9936 Fax: (805) 499-5323 Web Site: http://www.corwinpress.com/ $35.75, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Financing, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Initiatives, Mental health, Programs, School health, School health programs, School health services, Schools, Students

Clark MA, Trenholm C, Devaney B, Wheeler J, Quay L. 2007. Impacts of the Heritage Keepers Life Skills education component: Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 110 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of the Life Skills Education Component (a character-based program designed to enhance life skills thought to be supportive of sexual abstinence and to empower students to avoid sexual activity and other risky behaviors) on students in middle school and high school in Edgefield, South Carolina. The Life Skills Education Component is part of the Heritage Keepers abstinence education program, in which all students in the study had participated. The report presents estimates of the incremental impact of Life Skills on potential mediators of adolescent sexual activity as well as on adolescents' sexual abstinence, their risks of pregnancy and of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and other behavioral outcomes. The report is based on data collected in 2005-2996 from more than 600 adolescents. The report, which includes an executive summary, presents the design and methods for the impact evaluation, intermediate outcomes related to adolescent sexual activity, knowledge and perceptions of risks associated with adolescent sex, impacts on sexual absinence and adolescent risk behavior, and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes three appendices: (1) an outline of the Heritage Keepers curricula, (2) supporting tables for impact analysis, and (3) survey questions.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, High school students, Middle schools, Programs, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases

Carpenter CS, Stehr M. 2007. The effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on seatbelt use, motor vehicle fatalities, and crash-related injuries among youths. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 49 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13408)

Annotation: This paper assesses the effects of mandatory seatbelt laws on self-reported seatbelt use, highway fatalities, and crash-related injuries among high-school-age adolescents using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's national, state, and local Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and Fatality Analysis Reporting Systems from 1991 to 2005, a period spanning over 20 changes in seatbelt laws. The authors use quasi-experimental approaches that isolate the independent effects of seatbelt laws net of demographic characteristics, area and year fixed effects, and smooth area-specific trends. The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the problem, discusses previous literature, provides a data description and research design, and offers results and a discussion and conclusion. Footnotes and a bibliography are included. Statistical data are presented in figures and tables grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, High school students, Legislation, Motor vehicle crashes, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Research, Seat belts, Statistical data, Trends

Mental Health America. 2006. Factsheet: Bullying and gay youth. Alexandria, VA: Mental Health America, 5 pp.

Annotation: This electronic resource provides information on bullying actions that target gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender youth and the affect on their mental health and education. Advice and resources are provided for mental health, school counseling, human rights, advocacy, and for families and friends of lesbians and gays.

Contact: Mental Health America, 2000 North Beauregard Street, Sixth Floor , Alexandria, VA 22311, Telephone: (703) 684-7722 Secondary Telephone: (800) 969-6MHA Fax: (703) 684-5968 Web Site: http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, High schools, Homosexuality, Mental health, Middle schools, Resources for professionals, School counseling, Students, Violence prevention

Greene JP, Forster G. 2004. Sex, drugs, and delinquency in urban and suburban public schools. New York, NY: Center for Civic Innovation, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, 19 pp. (Education working paper; no. 4)

Annotation: This report discusses the perception that suburban schools are safer, more orderly, and more wholesome than urban schools. Using data on high school students from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the report looks at rates of sexual activity, pregnancy, smoking, alcohol use, substance abuse, and other types of delinquency in urban schools vs. suburban schools. The report also offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in a series of tables grouped together at the end of the report. The report also includes references and endnotes.

Contact: Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Center for Civic Innovation, 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 599-7000 Fax: (212) 599-3494 E-mail: mi@manhattan-institute.org Web Site: http://www.manhattan-institute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Delinquency, High schools, Safety, Smoking, Students, Substance abuse, Suburban population, Surveys, Urban population, Urban schools

American Society of Human Genetics. 2004. Enhancement of K-12 human genetics education: Creating a cooperative plan. [Bethesda, MD]: American Society of Human Genetics, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about a meeting convened in Bethesda, Maryland, on September 9-10, 2004, in recognition of the need to develop a cooperative plan to enhance human genetics education in classrooms, disseminate information, and generate interest among students in careers in human genetics and related fields. The report discusses differing perspectives on human genetics and genetics community resources. A brief summary of the meeting discussion is included, along with a table outlining what geneticists can do for students in different grades.

Contact: American Society of Human Genetics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 634-7300 Secondary Telephone: (866) HUM-GENE Fax: (301) 634-7079 Web Site: http://www.ashg.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Careers, Elementary school, Geneticists, Genetics education, High school students, Middle school, School-age children

Partee GL. 2003. Lessons learned about effective policies and practices for out-of-school-time programming. Washington, DC: American Youth Policy Forum, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report shares the stories and challenges behind the many policies and practices that communities have developed to support out-of-school-time (OST) programming. The report includes observations from school-based programs for elementary and high-school students as well as those from community settings for older out-of-school adolescents. The report also includes insights from field visits to community schools and beacon programs in elementary, middle, and high schools in New York City, Boston, Denver, Kansas City, and San Francisco. Chapter 1 of the report summarizes insights and major lessons learned. Chapter 2 provides an overview of the issues. Chapter 3 contains descriptions of two OST school-based models. Chapter 4 describes programs for older adolescents.

Contact: American Youth Policy Forum, 1836 Jefferson Place, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-2505, Telephone: (202) 775-9731 Fax: (207) 775-9733 E-mail: aypf@aypf.org Web Site: http://www.aypf.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-887031-83-9.

Keywords: Adolescents, After school programs, Children, Communities, Elementary school, High school, Middle school, Model programs, Out of school youth, Schools, Students

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.