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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (59 total).

Dimperio D. n.d.. Interconceptional Support of Women at High Risk for Low Birthweight [Final report]. Gainesville, FL: North Central Florida Maternal and Infant Care Project, 36 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to reduce the incidence of low birthweight by improving the preconceptional health of women who were at high risk for delivering a low birthweight infant. High-risk women were identified at delivery and were followed for 2 years. Client services were then provided by community health workers, who made home visits and developed a risk reduction plan for each client. Intervention protocols were developed for each risk factor and involved referral to the appropriate resource, followup to ensure client compliance, and reinforcement of professional counseling or supplemental teaching. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196848.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Services, Florida, High risk groups, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Indigent Patients, Infant Mortality, Intervention, Low Birthweight, WIC Program

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Mailloux S. n.d.. Improved Prenatal Care Utilization and Birth Outcome Project [Final report]. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 80 pp.

Annotation: This project surveyed 3000 postpartum Massachusetts women in order to identify barriers to, components of, and levels of participation in prenatal care, and to collect data on the social context of women's lives during pregnancy. Various interventions with high risk women at four demonstration sites were evaluated and compared. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-144236.

Keywords: High risk pregnancy, Hispanics, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care

Ronan L. n.d.. A Demonstration Model of Risk-Appropriate Prenatal Care System to Reduce the Incidence of Low Birthweight in Maine [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Medical Care Development, Inc. , 52 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to reduce infant morbidity and mortality due to low birthweight, and to demonstrate a cost-effective prenatal care program which was integrated into the existing system and can be duplicated in other states. Project objectives included: reducing the incidence of low birthweight newborns in the project; reducing the incidence of women who engage in high-risk behaviors during their pregnancy; instituting a model prenatal education, counseling, referral, and followup program in physicians' offices and other sites; and enhancing the education and counseling skills of prenatal care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103258.

Keywords: Counseling, Education of Health Professionals, Education of Patients, High risk pregnancy, Infant Morbidity, Infant Mortality, Low Birthweight, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Referrals

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

Flynn S, Duffy J. 2013. Patterns of family planning services, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among 15-19 year olds enrolled in SC Medicaid. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an analysis of contraceptive use and pregnancy patterns among low-income adolescents on Medicaid in South Carolina. Conducted by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the South Carolina Budget and Control Board, the report reveals the percentage of teens who became pregnant who used no birth control, or less reliable forms of birth control, and suggests that offering a different type of birth control to teens on Medicaid might help delay pregnancy and childbirth. Based on longitudinal data from one to five years for each teen, the report compares and contrasts contraceptive use, birth control methods, and rates of pregnancy according to the participants' age and race. The report concludes with recommendations to help reduce the teen pregnancy rate among low-income adolescents. in South Carolina.

Contact: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 771-7700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 849-0455 Fax: (803) 771-6916 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancysc.org Web Site: http://www.teenpregnancysc.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Comparative analysis, Contraceptive use, Data, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Prevention, South Carolina, State initiatives

Smith K, Colman S. 2012. Evaluation of adolescent pregnancy prevention approaches: Design of the impact study—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 80 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this final report is to describe the impact study component of the Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches—a response to persistent concerns about the consequences of adolescent sexual activity. The purpose of this 8-year (2008-2016) evaluation is to expand available evidence on effective ways to prevent and reduce pregnancy and related sexual risk behaviors among U.S. adolescents. The report provides an overview of the impact evaluation, including its policy context and goals, selection and key features of program models and sites, the impact study design, and the approach to estimating impacts and reporting results. The report also provides information on the seven individual sites to be evaluated and on the program model, evaluation design, and analytic approach for each site.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Evaluation, High risk adolescents, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Research

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health. 2011. Preventing teen pregnancy in the U.S.. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, 4 pp. (CDC vital signs)

Annotation: This fact sheet about preventing and reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States provides an introduction to the issue; presents the latest findings on adolescent pregnancy prevention; discusses who is at the highest risk; provides information about adolescent birthrates by state; explains what the government is doing to address the problem, what parents can do, and what adolescents can do; and provides code that allows users to place Centers for Disease Control and Prevention buttons to web pages.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, High risk groups, Mass media, Parents, Prevention, Research

ReachOut.com. 2010. We can help us [suicide prevention campaign]. ReachOut.com,

Annotation: This Web site for adolescents, created by the organization Reach Out, is designed to help adolescents cope with mental health problems and to help prevent adolescent suicide. The site presents information about issues such as suicide and self-harm; drugs, alcohol, and tobacco; relationships; loss and grief; and sexuality. Stories told by adolescents in their own voices are also included, and opportunities for adolescents to share their own stories and become involved with Reach Out are provided. Resources for getting help and support are included, as well.

Contact: Reach Out, Inspire USA Foundation, 657 Mission Street, Suite 507, San Francisco, CA 94105, E-mail: info@inspireusafoundation.org Web Site: http://us.reachout.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy Grief, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Alcohol consumption, Friendships, HIgh risk adolescents, Mental health, Prevention, Relationships, Resource materials, Substance abuse, Suicide prevention, Tobacco use, Violence prevention

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Adolescent Health Program. 2010. Nebraska State Abstinence Education Grant Program: State plan FY 2010. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 32 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This state plan describes the activities of Nebraska's State Abstinence Education Grant Program for 2010. The document discusses the problem and need associated with Nebraska adolescents and presents an implementation plan. Topics discussed in relation to the implementation plan include existing programs and gaps in services, challenges and barriers, mechanisms for implementation, monitoring, coordination, service recipient involvement, referrals, objective performance and efficiency measures, programmatic assurances, and budget.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Budgets, Education, High risk adolescents, High risk groups, Nebraska, Poverty, Program coordination, Referral, Service delivery, State grants, State programs

March of Dimes Foundation. 2009. Thinking about pregnancy after a premature birth. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes Foundation,

Annotation: This fact sheet is written for women who have had a premature infant and are concerned about having another. It provides information about what women and their health professionals can do to help ensure that women remain pregnant for a full 9 months.

Contact: March of Dimes Foundation, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (888) MODIMES Secondary Telephone: (914) 997-4488 E-mail: http://www.marchofdimes.com/contactus/contactus.html Web Site: http://www.modimes.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, High risk pregnancy, Pregnant women, Premature infants, Prematurity, Prevention, Risk factors, Treatment

Cernech B. 2009. Project WIN (Welcoming Infants Into Neighborhoods): Final report. Omaha, NE: Visiting Nurse Association, 19 pp.

Annotation: This final report focuses on Project WIN, a project whose purpose was to close gaps related to prenatal health, infant health, and safety in Omaha County and Douglas County in Omaha, Nebraska. The report discusses the project purpose; goals and objectives; methodology; evaluation; results, outcomes, and lessons learned; publications and products; dissemination and utilization of results; and sustainability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cultural competence, Families, Final reports, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Nebraska, Parenting skills, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Programs, Safety, Smoking during pregnancy, Woman's health

Minnesota Department of Health. 2009. If you are pregnant: Information on fetal development, abortion and alternatives. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward pregnant women, provides information on fetal development in 2-week intervals, from implantation to birth. It is illustrated with photographs of a fetus at different stages of developments. The booklet also provides information on the methods of abortion and the medical risks associated with abortion. In addition, the booklet discusses possible emotional side effects of abortion, the possibility of fetal pain, and some common medical risks associated with carrying an infant to term. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Consumer education materials, Fetal development, High risk pregnancy, Pregnancy, Spanish language materials

Healthy Teen Network. 2008. Preventing teen pregnancy among marginalized youth: Developing a policy, program, and research agenda for the future. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the discussion and consensus formed at a summit held on September 8, 2008 in which eight adolescent pregnancy experts convened to discuss prevention of adolescent pregnancy among marginalized youth. The report also describes the current state of the adolescent pregnancy field, explores new frameworks and theoretical underpinnings, and makes policy recommendations.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, High risk adolescents

Clark MA, Trenholm C, Devaney B, Wheeler J, Quay L. 2007. Impacts of the Heritage Keepers Life Skills education component: Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 110 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the impact of the Life Skills Education Component (a character-based program designed to enhance life skills thought to be supportive of sexual abstinence and to empower students to avoid sexual activity and other risky behaviors) on students in middle school and high school in Edgefield, South Carolina. The Life Skills Education Component is part of the Heritage Keepers abstinence education program, in which all students in the study had participated. The report presents estimates of the incremental impact of Life Skills on potential mediators of adolescent sexual activity as well as on adolescents' sexual abstinence, their risks of pregnancy and of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, and other behavioral outcomes. The report is based on data collected in 2005-2996 from more than 600 adolescents. The report, which includes an executive summary, presents the design and methods for the impact evaluation, intermediate outcomes related to adolescent sexual activity, knowledge and perceptions of risks associated with adolescent sex, impacts on sexual absinence and adolescent risk behavior, and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report includes three appendices: (1) an outline of the Heritage Keepers curricula, (2) supporting tables for impact analysis, and (3) survey questions.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, High school students, Middle schools, Programs, Risk taking, Sexually transmitted diseases

New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Medical Assistance and Health Services. 2007. Perinatal screening, risk assessment and referral form. Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Medical Assistance and Health Services, 2 items.

Annotation: This risk-assessment screening tool collects information on pregnancy risk factors, medical conditions, and social risk factors. The tool directs health professionals to examine the teeth and gums of pregnant women and to refer women with periodontal disease or other oral health problems to local oral health professionals for care. The form is designed to be incorporated into a central data repository for use by Medicaid managed care health plans in New Jersey. An accompanying document provides information on the pilot project, including design, implementation, key lessons, and future plans.

Contact: New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Medical Assistance and Health Services, P.O. Box 728, Trenton, NJ 08625-0212, Telephone: (800) 356-1561 Web Site: http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmahs/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Forms, High risk pregnancy, Medicaid, New Jersey, Oral health, Perinatal health, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Risk assessment, Screening, State programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.