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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Berman C. n.d.. Project Zero to Three: [Final report]. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 48 pp.

Annotation: The main goal of this project was to improve services for infants and toddlers with disabilities (or at risk for disabililties) and for their families by developing an interstate network for early identification and intervention services for this population. Activities included a national network meeting, two regional conferences, an intensive course, small topical meetings, consultations, publications, and a newsletter. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103373.

Keywords: American Public Welfare Association, Children's Defense Fund, Collaboration of Care, EPDST, Early Intervention, Environmental Risk, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, High risk infants, Networking, PL 99-457, WIC Program

Dimperio D. n.d.. Interconceptional Support of Women at High Risk for Low Birthweight [Final report]. Gainesville, FL: North Central Florida Maternal and Infant Care Project, 36 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to reduce the incidence of low birthweight by improving the preconceptional health of women who were at high risk for delivering a low birthweight infant. High-risk women were identified at delivery and were followed for 2 years. Client services were then provided by community health workers, who made home visits and developed a risk reduction plan for each client. Intervention protocols were developed for each risk factor and involved referral to the appropriate resource, followup to ensure client compliance, and reinforcement of professional counseling or supplemental teaching. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196848.

Keywords: Community-Based Health Services, Florida, High risk groups, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Indigent Patients, Infant Mortality, Intervention, Low Birthweight, WIC Program

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

Lee H, Warren A, Gill L. 2015. Cheaper, faster, better: Are state administrative data the answer? The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start second annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 items. (OPRE report 2015-09)

Annotation: This report details the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) process of acquiring administrative vital records and Medicaid data from 20 states and more than 40 state agencies. MIHOPE-Strong Start examines the effectiveness of home visiting services on improving birth and maternal health outcomes for women who are enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as well as their effectiveness at reducing costly health care encounters. The study relies on administrative data to measure infant and maternal health, health care use, and cost outcomes. The MIHOPE-Strong Start experience sheds light on the process of acquiring permission to access such data.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative problems, Children's Health Insurance Program, Confidentiality, Costs, Data collection, Health care utilization, Health status, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Measures, Medicaid, Multimedia, Outcome and process assessment, Program evaluation

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. 2015. Cost savings to Medicaid from the Maternal infant Program due to reduction in preterm birth rate. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, 1 p. (Return on investment fact sheet series, volume 1, issue 1)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the cost effectiveness of a program to supplement medical (prenatal and infant) care for Medicaid-eligible mothers in Michigan. Topics include how the program works, the program's effectiveness in reducing preterm birth, how much the program's prenatal services cost, how much preterm birth costs, and Medicaid's potential return on investment from the reduction in preterm and very preterm births and other savings..

Contact: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Capitol View Building, 201 Townsend Street, Lansing, MI 48913, Telephone: (517) 373-3740 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Costs, High risk mothers, Infant health, Medicaid, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, State MCH programs, Women's health

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Save the Children. 2014. State of the world's mothers 2014: Saving mothers and children in humanitarian crises. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 93 pp.

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Save the Children. 2013. Surviving the first day: State of the world's mothers 2013. Westport, CT: Save the Children, annual.

Annotation: This report looks at the first days of life, when mothers and newborns face threats to survival, and highlights approaches that are working to bring essential heath care to hard-to-reach places where most deaths occur. The report also demonstrates how more lives can be saved with additional funding. Topic include progress over the past two decades, why newborns die, the most dangerous places to be born, the continuum of care for mothers and newborns, funding and need, and how to take action.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, Financing, Health care, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Infant death, Infant mortality, International health, Newborn infants, Poverty, Prevention programs, Rural population, Trends

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center. 2012. Women and children with HIV/AIDS. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet examines the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and children in the United States. It includes an overview of the problem; describes how the virus is transmitted to women and from women to children; and discusses the symptoms and outcomes. The fact sheet also addresses HIV testing; the psychosocial factors and issues that can lead to HIV; and the societal and cultural stigma that can impact the lives of infected women and children. It also covers disclosure, legal issues, various forms of treatment, and the grief and loss that families experience when they lose a loved one to AIDS. A description of federal programs and services to assist families affected by HIV and AIDS is also provided. An online training tutorial on this topic is also available.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Risk factors, Training, AIDS, Child health, Counseling, Federal programs, HIV, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Psychosocial factors, Women's health

National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, American Institutes for Research, 201 Jones Road, Suite 1, Waltham, MA 02451, Telephone: (781) 373-7073 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

Children's Defense Fund-Minnesota. 2011. Zero to Three Research to Policy Project: Maternal depression and early childhood. [St. Paul, MN]: Children's Defense Fund-Minnesota, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the impact of maternal depression on very young children in Minnesota. The report discusses research findings on maternal depression and early childhood, implications of this research for Minnesota, and Minnesota's current system and options for decreasing the prevalence and impact of maternal depression in the state.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, Minnesota, 550 Park Street, Saint Paul, MN 55103, Telephone: (651) 227-6121 Fax: 651-227-2553 E-mail: cdf-mn@cdf-mn.org Web Site: http://www.cdf-mn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Depression, Health care systems, High risk groups, Mental health, Minnesota, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Prevention, Research, Risk factors, State surveys, Young children

Milwaukee Health Department. 2011. Safe sleep brief. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents key points about risk factors related to the deaths of 89 infants who died during sleep in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, during the first year of life between 2006 and 2009. Information is provided about characteristics of the infants and their mothers, smoking and infant death, and unsafe sleep risk factors.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, High risk groups, Infant death, Mothers, Racial factors, Risk factors, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Smoking, State surveys, Wisconsin

Golden O, Hawkins A, Beardslee W. 2011. Home visiting and maternal depression: Seizing the opportunities to help mothers and young children. Wasington, DC: Urban Institute, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide looks at home visiting as a promising approach to help identify mothers with depression and to connect their families to available services. Drawing on research as well as interviews with low‐income mothers, home visitors, and other service providers, the guide offers practical insights about how home visiting programs can enhance their own work and their links to other programs in the community—such as mental health treatment—to better serve depressed mothers and their young children. Included are a set of challenges that home visiting programs currently face in working with depressed mothers and identifies promising approaches to overcome each challenge.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Early childhood development, High risk groups, Home visiting, Mental health, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Program improvement, Service delivery, Young children

Family Violence Prevention Fund. 2010. Realizing the promise of home visitation: Addressing domestic violence and child maltreatment—A guide for policymakers. San Francisco, CA: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief is intended to help policymakers and advocates build a strong national policy framework to maximize the effectiveness and reach of early childhood home-visiting programs. More specifically, it is meant to ensure that federal home-visiting policies directly address the needs of mothers and children who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing domestic violence, the link between domestic violence and child abuse and neglect, and the impact of domestic violence on the health and well-being of children and families. The brief also provides an overview of home visiting and presents promising home-visiting programs.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Domestic violence, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Model programs, Public policy, Women's health, Young children

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health. 2008–. You Quit, Two Quit. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to support comprehensive tobacco use screening and cessation counseling for pregnant and postpartum women, with a focus on women with low incomes, new mothers, and recidivism prevention. Contents include information and resources for pregnant women, mothers, and families on topics such as the benefits of quitting, facts about quitting, plan to quit tobacco, getting support, and providing support. Information and resources for health professionals address topics such as an evidence-based tobacco counseling approach, tobacco facts, documentation forms, billing and reimbursement, patient education, provider education, and standing orders for tobacco cessation counseling. A practice bulletin, research, and reports and guidelines are also provided.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, High risk mothers, Low income groups, Perinatal health, Postpartum care, Postpartum women, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, Screening, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project. 2005. Research to practice: Services and outcomes for Early Head Start families enrolled during pregnancy—Is there a magic window. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on the timing of beginning supportive interventions for Early Head Start families enrolled during pregnancy. The fact sheet discusses the reasons that services started during pregnancy may have a lasting impact, risk factors of families who enroll in Head Start during pregnancy, other information about families who enroll in Head Start during pregnancy, and the impact of Early Head Start on children and families who enroll during pregnancy. A summary and implications are included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Early intervention services, Families, Family support, High risk groups, High risk mothers, Infant health, Intervention, Oral health, Pregnancy, Women's health

Cawthon L. 2004. First Steps database: Safe babies, safe moms. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis, 8 pp. (Fact sheet no. 4.36f)

Annotation: This brief summarizes the Washington state program Safe Babies, Safe Moms (formerly the Comprehensive Program Evaluation Project, or CPEP) implemented to improve the health and welfare of substance abusing mothers and their young children and provides an update to the October 2003 evaluation report with additional outcome measures and longer periods of follow-up. Measures tracked include demonstrated behavior change in the use of more effective family planning methods, reduced levels of parenting stress, decreased arrest rates, a reduction in low birth weight infants for those pregnant women enrolled in the program before delivery, decreased accepted referrals for child abuse or neglect for mothers enrolled before delivery, and higher employment rates for non-substance abusing Medicaid women than substance abusers.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Drug affected infants, High risk mothers, Housing programs, Program evaluation, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Washington, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.