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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (96 total).

Sells C. n.d.. High Priority Infant Tracking Project [Final report]. Olympia, WA: Washington State Office of Parent Child Health Services, 53 pp.

Annotation: Washington State developed and established a system for identifying and tracking high risk infants from birth to age three years. It was an integrated service of the community health care system, including hospitals, health departments, and primary care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196715.

Keywords: Early intervention, High risk infants, Identification, Tracking system

Berman C. n.d.. Project Zero to Three: [Final report]. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 48 pp.

Annotation: The main goal of this project was to improve services for infants and toddlers with disabilities (or at risk for disabililties) and for their families by developing an interstate network for early identification and intervention services for this population. Activities included a national network meeting, two regional conferences, an intensive course, small topical meetings, consultations, publications, and a newsletter. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103373.

Keywords: American Public Welfare Association, Children's Defense Fund, Collaboration of Care, EPDST, Early Intervention, Environmental Risk, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, High risk infants, Networking, PL 99-457, WIC Program

Shimizu H. n.d.. Identification of Hearing Loss in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at The Johns Hopkins Hospital [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 27 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop and recommend an appropriate hearing screening model to be used in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) in the state or nation. The project was designed to compare three of the most commonly used screening procedures to determine the incidence of hearing loss, to identify the most predictive procedure or cluster of procedures for screening hearing loss in the NICU, to study the relationship between hearing screening procedures and the outcome of independent audiometric and developmental measures, and to identify the most cost effective mass hearing screening procedures. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152825.

Keywords: Data Collection, Hearing, Hearing Loss, High risk infants Hearing Impaired, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Screening

Poisson S. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Cooperative Agreement [Final report]. Rockville, MD: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 52 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop and implement comprehensive and family-centered approaches to early identification, assessment, and treatment of infants and young children who are at risk for or suffering from emotional and/or regulatory difficulties. To this end, the Regional Center for Infants and Young Children: (1) Monitored types of families and children referred to and receiving services from an agency specializing in the early detection of emotional disorders or potential risk; (2) developed principles and technology to identify infants and young children/families at risk for psychosocial and developmental difficulties; (3) developed comprehensive, family-centered approaches to assessment and diagnosis; (4) developed prevention-oriented, family-centered approaches to intervention; (5) developed and disseminated technical assistance and training approaches; (6) engaged State and local maternal and child health (MCH) agencies in the project; and (7) accessed multiple financial resources to support its efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158236.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Data Collection, Family-Centered Health Care, High risk groups: Families, High risk infants, Parents, Regulatory Disorders, Screening Tools, Temperament

Benford M. n.d.. MATCH II: A Merged Database for Health and Developmental Disabilities [Final report]. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve coordination and continuity of early intervention and health related services to infants and young children who have, or are at risk for, developmental disabilities or delays. The project developed a collaborative mechanism via computer linkage for referring, tracking, and evaluating these children. A microbased computerized identification, referral, and tracking system has been developed for use at the local level. Through the merged database and tracking system, the project sought to improve child find, service coordination, follow-along, and program evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161974.

Keywords: Case Management, Collaboration of Care, Computer Linkage, Data Bases, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPDST, Early Intervention, Families, High risk infants, Medicaid, Referrals, WIC Program

Nickel R. n.d.. Oregon Developmental Monitoring Project for High Risk Infants [Final report]. Eugene, OR: Oregon Health Sciences University , 38 pp.

Annotation: This project established a model program for the coordination of early identification and assessment services for infants 0-3 years of age at high risk for major handicaps. It aimed to make appropriate developmental screening available as close as possible to the infant's home community, to provide the necessary developmental screening training to local health and educational service providers, and to provide the regional coordination for the many agencies and professional involved. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-156693.

Keywords: Clinics, Coordination of Health Care, Early Intervention, Education of Health Professionals, High risk infants, Rural Population, Screening

Websters International. n.d.. The Bowdoin Method of parenting education. Brentwood, TN: Websters International, 14 pp., 1 videotape.

Annotation: This packet includes a brochure and informational videotape describing the Bowdoin Method of Parent Education, an education program for high-risk children. The Bowdoin Method contains three separate curricula that teach parents of children from birth through age 13 the attitudes and skills they need to prepare their children for school and life. The materials are geared toward parents with low literacy levels. Descriptions of packages of materials available for purchase, as well as order forms, are included. The packages include parenting books, games, teachers' manuals, parent prizes, posters, pre- and posttest, and videotapes. The materials are available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Audiovisual materials, Children, High risk children, Infants, Life skills, Low literacy materials, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Parents, School readiness, Spanish language materials

Aris C, Weeks C, American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians. n.d.. Taking your baby home from the NICU: Facts about safe sleep. [Marietta, GA]: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure is for parents taking home their newborn that has been discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It defines sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and provides advice on safe sleep positioning and environments for the infant at home. Topics also include the increased risk factors for SIDS of infants that have needed special care at birth, the importance of breastfeeding, not sharing a bed with an infant by parents or siblings, "tummy time", proper bedtime clothing and temperature, the use of a pacifier, and a safe crib. It mentions differences between how things were done in the NICU and how they should be done at home.

Contact: American Association of SIDS Prevention Physicians, 528 Raven Way, Naples, FL 34110, Telephone: (239) 431-5425 Fax: (239) 431-5536 E-mail: AASPP@sids.org Web Site: http://www.aaspp.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Brochures, Consumer education materials, High risk infants, Hospitals, Infant health, Injury prevention, Neonatal intensive care units, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep position

Payne E, Garcia S, Minkovitz C, Grason H, Strobino D. 2017. Strengthen the evidence base for maternal and child health programs: NPM 3–Risk-appropriate perinatal care [NPM 3 brief]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs may consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in hospitals with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include information about the methods and results of the evidence review, key findings, and implications. The full review is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Hospitals, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Protective factors, Regional medical centers, Regional planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Systems development, Title V programs

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center. 2017. Strengthen the evidence for maternal and child health programs: National performance measure 3 risk-appropriate perinatal care evidence review. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 46 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies evidence-informed strategies that state Title V programs might consider implementing to increase the percentage of very low birth weight (<1500 gm) infants born in a hospital with a level III or higher neonatal intensive care unit. Contents include an introduction and background; review methods and results, including search results, characteristics of studies reviewed, intervention components, summary of study results, and evidence rating and evidence continuum; and implications of the review. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Childbirth, Evidence-based practice, High risk pregnancy, Infant mortality, Intervention, Literature reviews, Low birthweight, Measures, Model programs, Neonatal intensive care units, Newborn infants, Perinatal care, Policy development, Program planning, Resources for professionals, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Clevenger AA. 2017. Overdose poisoning deaths to children in Virginia, 2009-2013. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations from case reviews of overdose poison deaths among infants, children, and adolescents up to age 17 in Virginia for the five year period between 2009 and 2013. Topics include how overdose is impacting infants and children and their families in Virginia, which children are at risk, where are they at risk, how are they at risk, and what can be done to further promote health and safety in their lives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 400 East Jackson Street, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 786-3174 Fax: (804) 371-8595 E-mail: OCME_CENT@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/medical-examiner Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Child death review, Child safety, Children, Health promotion, High risk groups, Household safety, Infants, Injury prevention, Opiates, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Virginia

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2017. Giving more babies a healthy start in life: An Anthem Foundation & March of Dimes collaboration to reduce preterm births. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes national and state initiatives to scale up and implement programs that encourage and facilitate first trimester prenatal care and help at-risk mothers commit to behaviors that reduce the numbers of low birthweight infants. Topics include a group prenatal care model called CenteringPregnancy®, smoking cessation programs, quality improvement initiatives related to the elimination of early elective deliveries, and Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait Community Programs®.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Collaboration, Community based programs, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health behavior, Health promotion, High risk infants, High risk mothers, High risk pregnancy, Low birthweight, Models, National initiatives, Peer support programs, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention programs, Smoking cessation

Lee H, Warren A, Gill L. 2015. Cheaper, faster, better: Are state administrative data the answer? The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start second annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 items. (OPRE report 2015-09)

Annotation: This report details the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) process of acquiring administrative vital records and Medicaid data from 20 states and more than 40 state agencies. MIHOPE-Strong Start examines the effectiveness of home visiting services on improving birth and maternal health outcomes for women who are enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as well as their effectiveness at reducing costly health care encounters. The study relies on administrative data to measure infant and maternal health, health care use, and cost outcomes. The MIHOPE-Strong Start experience sheds light on the process of acquiring permission to access such data.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative problems, Children's Health Insurance Program, Confidentiality, Costs, Data collection, Health care utilization, Health status, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Measures, Medicaid, Multimedia, Outcome and process assessment, Program evaluation

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Save the Children. 2013. Surviving the first day: State of the world's mothers 2013. Westport, CT: Save the Children, annual.

Annotation: This report looks at the first days of life, when mothers and newborns face threats to survival, and highlights approaches that are working to bring essential heath care to hard-to-reach places where most deaths occur. The report also demonstrates how more lives can be saved with additional funding. Topic include progress over the past two decades, why newborns die, the most dangerous places to be born, the continuum of care for mothers and newborns, funding and need, and how to take action.

Contact: Save the Children, 501 Kings Highway East, Fairfield, CT 06825, Telephone: (203) 221-4000 Web Site: http://www.savethechildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Developing countries, Financing, Health care, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Infant death, Infant mortality, International health, Newborn infants, Poverty, Prevention programs, Rural population, Trends

Genetic Alliance, Family Voices. 2013. Children and youth with special healthcare needs in Healthy People 2020: A consumer perspective. Washington, DC: Genetic Alliance; Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document examines Healthy People 2020 objectives and serves as a companion to Envision 2020, the 10-year strategic plan for the Division of Services for Children with Special Heath Needs in the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The document provides background; discusses trends in programs, legislation, and care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSCN); provides core performance measures for CYSCN; discusses who is at risk for chronic illnesses and disabilities; and offers information about preparing children and families for the future. Stories about individual children and families are included.

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special heath care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Families, Health services, Healthy People 2020: Children with special health care needs, High risk children, High risk infants, Infants with special health care needs, Legislation, Programs, Transition planning, Young adults

Center for Law and Social Policy, Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care. 2012. Promote access to early, regular and comprehensive screenings. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 10 pp.

Annotation: This electronic resource focuses on describing what infants and young children in child care need and offers 15 recommendations to help states move toward ensuring that these needs are met. The resource explains what infant screening is and why it is needed and discusses how states can ensure that infants and young children are screened for developmental delays. A bibliography, policy ideas, state examples, and online resources are included.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early childhood development, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant development, Infant health, Infants with developmental disabilities, Public policy, Resource materials, State programs, Young children

National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center. 2012. Women and children with HIV/AIDS. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet examines the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and children in the United States. It includes an overview of the problem; describes how the virus is transmitted to women and from women to children; and discusses the symptoms and outcomes. The fact sheet also addresses HIV testing; the psychosocial factors and issues that can lead to HIV; and the societal and cultural stigma that can impact the lives of infected women and children. It also covers disclosure, legal issues, various forms of treatment, and the grief and loss that families experience when they lose a loved one to AIDS. A description of federal programs and services to assist families affected by HIV and AIDS is also provided. An online training tutorial on this topic is also available.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Risk factors, Training, AIDS, Child health, Counseling, Federal programs, HIV, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Psychosocial factors, Women's health

Howson CP, Kinney MV, eds. 2012. Born too soon: The global action report on preterm birth. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 113 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses what is known about preterm birth and its causes and trends. The report, which includes national, regional, and global estimates of preterm birthrates, including rates by country, presents a plan for the actions needed to reduce the incidence of death and disability resulting from preterm birth, provide care for infants born preterm, and reduce the numbers of preterm births.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9789241503433.

Keywords: Geographic factors, High risk infants, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Infant death, Infant health, Infant mortality, International health, Neonatal intensive care, Postpartum care, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Preterm birth, Prevention

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2012. Identifying mental health and substance use problems of children and adolescents: A guide for child-serving organizations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 213 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is geared toward those working in child-serving organizations and the families of children and adolescents (from birth through age 22) being served, promotes the early identification of children and adolescents with mental health and substance use problems and provides guidance, tools, and resources for early identification. The guide addresses the approaches, methods, and strategies used to identify mental health and substance use problems in high-risk children and adolescents. The guide also discusses understanding the identification process and tools, key steps of early identification, and partnering for resources.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA 12-4670.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Child mental health, Children, Collaboration, Costs, Early intervention, Families, High risk groups, Infant mental health, Infants, Mental health, Resource materials, Substance abuse, Treatment, Young adults

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.