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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (189 total).

Wittenmyer J. n.d.. Amelioration of Health Problems of Children with Parents with Mental Retardation: [Final report]. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, 51 pp.

Annotation: This project attempted to improve the health status of children in families in which one or both parents have mental retardation by reducing the risks associated with lack of immunization, poor nutrition, undiagnosed medical or developmental problems, injuries, and inadequate early stimulation. Efforts included both direct services (such as immunization, screening, and home care programs) and a consultation and technical assistance program aimed at improving the accessibility of the service delivery system for these children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-201051.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Barriers to Health Care, Health Education, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, Mental Retardation, Parents, Parents with disabilities, Preventive Health Care, Primary Care

Berman C. n.d.. Project Zero to Three: [Final report]. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 48 pp.

Annotation: The main goal of this project was to improve services for infants and toddlers with disabilities (or at risk for disabililties) and for their families by developing an interstate network for early identification and intervention services for this population. Activities included a national network meeting, two regional conferences, an intensive course, small topical meetings, consultations, publications, and a newsletter. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103373.

Keywords: American Public Welfare Association, Children's Defense Fund, Collaboration of Care, EPDST, Early Intervention, Environmental Risk, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies Coalition, High risk infants, Networking, PL 99-457, WIC Program

Breakey G. n.d.. Facilitation of Primary Care Physician Participation in Preventive Health Care of Children Age 0-5 from Underserved, Diverse Cultural Populations: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Family Stress Center, 30 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce the incidence of poor health characteristics among low-income, culturally diverse populations by promoting the involvement of primary care physicians (pediatricians) in early screening and intervention. Project goals included increasing the level of preventive health care for underserved children, reducing the severity of psychosocial problems, increasing physicians' sense of involvement as part of a team in providing services to project children and their families, and demonstrating a practical process for accomplishing these goals which can be replicated across the nation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152833.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Abuse and Neglect Preventive, Continuing Education, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, EPSDT, Hawaiians, Health Care, Health Supervision Guidelines, High risk children, Low income groups, Medicaid, Primary Care, Psychological Problems, Well Child Care

Nelson R. n.d.. Demonstration of a Regional Nutrition Program for Handicapped or At-Risk Children: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, 40 pp.

Annotation: This project's goals were to provide comprehensive community-based nutrition consultation services to children with special health needs, nutrition-related intervention to children and adolescents identified as high risk for future coronary heart disease, and nutrition-related weight management services to children and adolescents identified as obese. The objectives were to: (1) Make available a comprehensive nutritional program for children with handicapping conditions or chronic diseases by means of screening and, if needed, through their involvement in a nutrition care plan; (2) identify at an early age and screen for hypercholesterolemia those children and adolescents who have a family history of coronary heart disease and to provide them and their families with subsequent dietary and other risk factory counseling; and (3) make available a comprehensive, individualized regional weight management program for obese children and adolescents and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152916.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Handicapped High risk children, Heart Disease, Nutrition, WIC Program

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

Websters International. n.d.. The Bowdoin Method of parenting education. Brentwood, TN: Websters International, 14 pp., 1 videotape.

Annotation: This packet includes a brochure and informational videotape describing the Bowdoin Method of Parent Education, an education program for high-risk children. The Bowdoin Method contains three separate curricula that teach parents of children from birth through age 13 the attitudes and skills they need to prepare their children for school and life. The materials are geared toward parents with low literacy levels. Descriptions of packages of materials available for purchase, as well as order forms, are included. The packages include parenting books, games, teachers' manuals, parent prizes, posters, pre- and posttest, and videotapes. The materials are available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Audiovisual materials, Children, High risk children, Infants, Life skills, Low literacy materials, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Parents, School readiness, Spanish language materials

Clevenger AA. 2017. Overdose poisoning deaths to children in Virginia, 2009-2013. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations from case reviews of overdose poison deaths among infants, children, and adolescents up to age 17 in Virginia for the five year period between 2009 and 2013. Topics include how overdose is impacting infants and children and their families in Virginia, which children are at risk, where are they at risk, how are they at risk, and what can be done to further promote health and safety in their lives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 400 East Jackson Street, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 786-3174 Fax: (804) 371-8595 E-mail: OCME_CENT@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/medical-examiner Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Child death review, Child safety, Children, Health promotion, High risk groups, Household safety, Infants, Injury prevention, Opiates, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Virginia

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. 2015 annual report on the quality of care for children in Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report shows the progress made by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and states to systematically measure and report on the quality of care that children enrolled in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) receive. Contents include information about state-specific findings on quality and access in Medicaid and CHIP and monitoring and improving care for children enrolled in managed care. Topics include primary care access and preventive care, management of acute and chronic conditions, childhood obesity, oral health care, prenatal and postpartum care, and adolescent well care.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Child health, Children's Health Insurance Program, Federal programs, High risk children, Managed care, Measures, Medicaid, Nutrition, Oral health, Perinatal health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, State programs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. 2015 annual report on the quality of care for children in Medicaid and CHIP: Chart pack. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 75 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes state reporting on the quality of health care service for children covered by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) during the fiscal year. which generally covers care delivered during the calendar year. Contents include detailed analyses of state performance on publicly reported measures. Topics include the child core set, primary care access and preventive care, perinatal care, care of acute and chronic conditions, behavioral health care, oral health services, and trends in state performance. Reference tables and additional resources are also included. The information presented is abstracted from the Annual Secretary's Report on the Quality of Care for Children in Medicaid and CHIP.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Acute care, Adolescent health, Child health, Children's Health Insurance Program, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, High risk children, Measures, Medicaid, Mental health, Oral health, Perinatal care, Perinatal health, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Progress reports, Quality assurance, State programs, Statistical data, Trends

Lee H, Warren A, Gill L. 2015. Cheaper, faster, better: Are state administrative data the answer? The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start second annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 3 items. (OPRE report 2015-09)

Annotation: This report details the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) process of acquiring administrative vital records and Medicaid data from 20 states and more than 40 state agencies. MIHOPE-Strong Start examines the effectiveness of home visiting services on improving birth and maternal health outcomes for women who are enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), as well as their effectiveness at reducing costly health care encounters. The study relies on administrative data to measure infant and maternal health, health care use, and cost outcomes. The MIHOPE-Strong Start experience sheds light on the process of acquiring permission to access such data.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative problems, Children's Health Insurance Program, Confidentiality, Costs, Data collection, Health care utilization, Health status, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Measures, Medicaid, Multimedia, Outcome and process assessment, Program evaluation

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Save the Children. 2014. State of the world's mothers 2014: Saving mothers and children in humanitarian crises. Westport, CT: Save the Children, 93 pp.

Thompson RA, Haskins R. 2014. Early stress gets under the skin: Promising initiatives to help children facing chronic adversity. Princeton, NJ: Future of Children, 7 pp. (Policy brief; Spring 2014.)

Acoca L, Stephens J, Van Vleet A. 2014. Health coverage and care for youth in the juvenile justice system: The role of Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Data, Health insurance, High risk adolescents, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Program improvement, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Youth

Sacks V, Murphey D, Moore K. 2014. Adverse childhood experiences: National and state level prevalence. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Research brief)

Moore K, Sacks V, Bandy T, Murphey D. 2014. Adverse childhood experiences and well-being of adolescents. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Georgetown University, Georgetown Public Policy Institute and Center for Juvenile Justice Reform. 2013. Positive outcomes for at-risk children and youth: Improving lives through practice and system reform: January 24-25, 2013—[Participant's folder]. Washington, DC: Georgetown Public Policy Institute, 13 items.

Annotation: This conference packet contains materials from the Georgetown Public Policy Institute (GPPI) Leadership, Evidence, Analysis, and Debate (LEAD) Conference held in January 2013. The inaugural conference -- Positive Outcomes for At-risk Children and Youth: Improving Lives through Practice and System Reform -- focused on promoting effective solutions to the problems facing the nation's most disadvantaged and vulnerable children and youth and highlighted some of the significant work of GPPI's Center for Juventile Justice Reform (CJJR) and Georgetown faculty members. Included in the packet are the conference agenda, speaker biographies, and handouts from GPPI, CJJR, the MCH Library, the SUID/SIDS Resource Center, and the Oral Health Resource Center at Georgetown University.

Contact: Georgetown University, McCourt School of Public Policy, Old North, Suite 100, Washington, DC 20057, Telephone: (202) 687-5932 Fax: (202) 687-5544 E-mail: gppiadmissions@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://mspp.georgetown.edu/

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Public policy, Reform, Youth

D'Angelo AV, Rich L, Kwiatt J. 2013. Integrating family support services into schools: Lessons from the Elev8 Initiative. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief uses data from Chapin Hall’s evaluation of the Elev8 Full-Service Schools Initiative as a case study to focus on the challenges and benefits of offering economic support services to low income families at schools. Based on their findings, the authors conclude that the Elev8 Initiative, which brings together schools, families, and the community in underserved neighborhoods, shows promise as a way to provide support services to families while improving the educational opportunities for their children. Using lessons learned from the Eval8 Initiativ, the authors present recommendations for future efforts to integrate economic support services into schools. Their suggested strategies include hiring long-term staff members to build trusting relationships with parents; offering economic support services in conjunction with a broader array of services; ensuring clear lines of communication between partner organizations; and taking steps to ensure parents’ privacy.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Economic factors, Educational factors, Evaluation, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Models, Partnerships, School-linked programs

Childhood Asthma Leadership Coalition. 2013. Ensuring stable and continuous health insurance coverage for children with asthma. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Department of Health Policy, 5 pp. (Leveraging Affordable Care Act opportunities to improve childhood asthma outcomes)

Annotation: This report provides information about how advocacy organizations can mobilize around Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) provisions to improve health outcomes for children most at risk for asthma. The report describes several ACA provisions and implementation activities that target stability and continuity of health insurance for children, including (1) heath insurance coverage of preventive health services, (2) development of an essential health benefit for all individuals securing insurance through state health insurance exchanges, (3) streamlining enrollment procedures under Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, and state exchanges, (4) expanding Medicaid to cover individuals with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty line, and (5) enhanced Medicaid payments to primary care physicians.

Contact: George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy, 950 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., Sixth Floor, Washington, DC 20052, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/departments/health-policy Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Asthma, Child health, Children's Health Insurance Program, Enrollment, Health insurance, Health services, High risk children, Legislation, Low income groups, Medicaid, Prevention, Reimbursement, State programs, Treatment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.