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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (123 total).

Harrison P. n.d.. Comprehensive Health Services System for Youth Offenders: [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 34 pp.

Annotation: This 3-year demonstration project sought to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health services for adolescents detained or housed in institutional settings within the State Juvenile Service Agency (JSA). The overall purpose was to establish a link between the state Title V agency and the Juvenile Services Agency to assist the JSA to (1) determine the particular characteristics, health needs, and concerns of their adolescent population and (2) develop and manage appropriate comprehensive health systems as a model for the nation. The project designed a health information system (consisting of a personal computer using D-Base III plus software) to monitor the health status of the population and a training handbook for Juvenile Justice personnel. Information obtained regarding health status of the population was used in designing training materials for juvenile justice staff. Further training needs were identified by conducting an in-depth needs assessment and analysis. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-242008.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Continuing Education, High risk adolescents, Juvenile Delinquents, Nurses

Langley M. n.d.. Continuum's Minority Connection Project [Final report]. Atlanta, GA: CONTINUUM Alliance for Healthy Mothers and Children, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to reduce postneonatal mortality rates associated with inadequate parenting skills and poor utilization of prenatal and child health care services. Activities included establishment of a resource mothers program in which church women were trained to assist pregnant women in negotiating the health care and social services systems, and implementation of a teen peer counselor program. The project also established self-sustaining local coalitions to monitor and address problems that contribute to poor pregnancy outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196889.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Adolescents, Blacks, Clergy, Community-Based Health Services, High risk groups, High risk pregnancy, Infant Mortality, Low income groups, Postneonatal Mortality, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Religious organizations, Rural Populations

Clevenger AA. 2017. Overdose poisoning deaths to children in Virginia, 2009-2013. Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations from case reviews of overdose poison deaths among infants, children, and adolescents up to age 17 in Virginia for the five year period between 2009 and 2013. Topics include how overdose is impacting infants and children and their families in Virginia, which children are at risk, where are they at risk, how are they at risk, and what can be done to further promote health and safety in their lives. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Virginia Department of Health, Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 400 East Jackson Street, Richmond, VA 23219, Telephone: (804) 786-3174 Fax: (804) 371-8595 E-mail: OCME_CENT@vdh.virginia.gov Web Site: http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/medical-examiner Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Case studies, Child death review, Child safety, Children, Health promotion, High risk groups, Household safety, Infants, Injury prevention, Opiates, Poisoning, Prescription drugs, Virginia

Acoca L, Stephens J, Van Vleet A. 2014. Health coverage and care for youth in the juvenile justice system: The role of Medicaid and CHIP. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 14 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of the health and mental health needs of girls and boys in the juvenile justice system and the role of Medicaid in addressing those needs. It focuses on the circumstances of those girls and boys who are placed in juvenile justice residential facilities, the discontinuity of Medicaid coverage for those youth, and the options for improving coverage, continuity of care and access to needed services post-discharge, including opportunities provided by the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Data, Health insurance, High risk adolescents, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Program improvement, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Youth

Murphey D, Barry M, Vaughn B. 2013. Mental health disorders. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of mental health disorders with an emphasis on adolescent health. It describes the types of mental disorders; explains which types are most common among adolescents; and discusses risky behavior and other consequences associated with mental health disorders in youth. The paper also looks at variations in the risk of mental disorders across gender, socioeconomic status, and other variables; discusses forms of treatment and barriers to care; and describes strategies and approaches to help reduce mental disorders among adolescents.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-01.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescent mental health, High risk adolescents, Mental disorders, Treatment

Georgetown University, Georgetown Public Policy Institute and Center for Juvenile Justice Reform. 2013. Positive outcomes for at-risk children and youth: Improving lives through practice and system reform: January 24-25, 2013—[Participant's folder]. Washington, DC: Georgetown Public Policy Institute, 13 items.

Annotation: This conference packet contains materials from the Georgetown Public Policy Institute (GPPI) Leadership, Evidence, Analysis, and Debate (LEAD) Conference held in January 2013. The inaugural conference -- Positive Outcomes for At-risk Children and Youth: Improving Lives through Practice and System Reform -- focused on promoting effective solutions to the problems facing the nation's most disadvantaged and vulnerable children and youth and highlighted some of the significant work of GPPI's Center for Juventile Justice Reform (CJJR) and Georgetown faculty members. Included in the packet are the conference agenda, speaker biographies, and handouts from GPPI, CJJR, the MCH Library, the SUID/SIDS Resource Center, and the Oral Health Resource Center at Georgetown University.

Contact: Georgetown University, McCourt School of Public Policy, Old North, Suite 100, Washington, DC 20057, Telephone: (202) 687-5932 Fax: (202) 687-5544 E-mail: gppiadmissions@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://mspp.georgetown.edu/

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Public policy, Reform, Youth

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Reducing teen pregnancy in the United States. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 video (60 min.). (Public health grand rounds)

Annotation: This webcast focuses on reducing adolescent pregnancy in the United States. The speakers discuss ramifications of adolescent pregnancy and ways of preventing it and the roles of public health programs, parents, and health professionals in the effort. Progress in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates worldwide as well as the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention's efforts are discussed. The speakers also provide statistics related to adolescent pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Communication, Contraception, Costs, Education, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Parent child relations, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Statistical data

Genetic Alliance, Family Voices. 2013. Children and youth with special healthcare needs in Healthy People 2020: A consumer perspective. Washington, DC: Genetic Alliance; Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document examines Healthy People 2020 objectives and serves as a companion to Envision 2020, the 10-year strategic plan for the Division of Services for Children with Special Heath Needs in the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau. The document provides background; discusses trends in programs, legislation, and care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSCN); provides core performance measures for CYSCN; discusses who is at risk for chronic illnesses and disabilities; and offers information about preparing children and families for the future. Stories about individual children and families are included.

Contact: Genetic Alliance, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 404, Washington, DC 20008-2369, Telephone: (202) 966-5557 Secondary Telephone: (800) 336-GENE Fax: (202) 966-8553 E-mail: info@geneticalliance.org Web Site: http://www.geneticalliance.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special heath care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Families, Health services, Healthy People 2020: Children with special health care needs, High risk children, High risk infants, Infants with special health care needs, Legislation, Programs, Transition planning, Young adults

Flynn S, Duffy J. 2013. Patterns of family planning services, contraceptive use, and pregnancy among 15-19 year olds enrolled in SC Medicaid. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an analysis of contraceptive use and pregnancy patterns among low-income adolescents on Medicaid in South Carolina. Conducted by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the South Carolina Budget and Control Board, the report reveals the percentage of teens who became pregnant who used no birth control, or less reliable forms of birth control, and suggests that offering a different type of birth control to teens on Medicaid might help delay pregnancy and childbirth. Based on longitudinal data from one to five years for each teen, the report compares and contrasts contraceptive use, birth control methods, and rates of pregnancy according to the participants' age and race. The report concludes with recommendations to help reduce the teen pregnancy rate among low-income adolescents. in South Carolina.

Contact: South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 771-7700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 849-0455 Fax: (803) 771-6916 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancysc.org Web Site: http://www.teenpregnancysc.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Comparative analysis, Contraceptive use, Data, High risk adolescents, Low income groups, Prevention, South Carolina, State initiatives

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. "Statutory rape:" Sex between young teens and older individuals-Indicators on children and youth. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on instances in which children and adolescents under age 15 engage in sexual relationships with someone at least 3 years older (statutory rape). Topics include importance; trends; differences by race and by Hispanic origin; by parental education; and by age at first sex; state, local, and international estimates; national goals; and related indicators. Statistical data are presented throughout the report. A definition of statutory rape is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Age factors, Educational factors, High risk adolescents, Racial factors, Rape, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Statistical data, Trends

Garber AK, Park J, Brindis CD, Vaughn B, Barry M, Guzman L, Berger A. 2013. Physical development and daily health habits. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends; San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 8 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report provides information about the importance of healthy nutrition and physical activity habits in adolescence. The report discusses ways that physical activity and good nutrition are particularly important during adolescence, presents trends and statistics related to nutrition and physical activity in adolescence, discusses who is at increased risk for unhealthy habits, and provides resources.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-09.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, High risk adolescents, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Trends, Statistical data

Abramson D, Brooks K, Peek L. 2013. The science and practice of resilience interventions for children exposed to disasters. Washington, DC: National Academies, Institute of Medicine, 16 pp.

Annotation: This white paper considers the current science and practice of resilience interventions for children and adolescents who are susceptible to disasters or who have been exposed to disasters. The paper reviews ways ithat resilience research has influenced resilience interventions, considers specific illustrations of these resilience practices, and examines the evidentiary base for these activities. The paper places these disaster-related resilience interventions within a public health framework of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention and explores the challenges of developing evidence-based resilience practices within the context of disasters.

Contact: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2352 Fax: (202) 334-1412 E-mail: HMD-NASEM@nas.edu Web Site: https://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Disaster planning, Disasters, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Intervention, Prevention, Public health, Research, Resilience

Brandt R, Phillips R. 2013. Improving supports for youth of color traumatized by violence. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the most effective ways to support male children and adolescents traumatized by exposure to violence. The report introduces the problem and then discusses theoretical models and approaches, including school-based employment-based, and care-coordination strategies, improved implementation of service systems; and action steps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent males, Behavior modification, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Communities, Families, Health care systems, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Low income groups, Male children, Poverty, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Schools, Service delivery, Trauma, Violence, Violence prevention

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2013. FLU and children / youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN). Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help parents and other caregivers protect children and youth at highest risk for influenza complications. Contents include a fact sheet, a media toolkit, a web-based portal for submitting a family story, a flu vaccine finder, a letter for parents and caregivers to give to their pediatrician, and presentation slides. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Disease prevention, Families, High risk groups, Immunization, Influenza, Mass media, Spanish language materials, Special health care needs

Garber AK, Park J, Brindis CD, Vaughn B, Barry M, Guzman L, Berger A. 2013. Chronic conditions. [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends; San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, 8 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report addresses adolescence as a critical period for identifying and managing chronic conditions, focusing largely on physical chronic conditions affecting adolescents ages 10-17. Topics include special health care needs (SHCNs) and group differences in risk, trends in the incidence of chronic conditions, implications of chronic conditions for adolescents and parents, and related resources. The report includes data on the prevalence of selected common chronic conditions in adolescents, the percentage of adolescents with SHCN by gender and race/ethnicity, days of school missed due to SHCNs among adolescents with a SHCN, and family out-of-pocket expenses for adolescent's SHCNs among parents of adolescents with SHCN by insurance status.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-08.

Keywords: Adolescents, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, High risk adolescents, Special health care needs, Statistical data, Trends

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. 2012 recommended immunizations for children from 7 through 18 years old. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about recommended immunizations for children and adolescents ages 7-18. The fact sheet is divided into three age ranges: 7-10, 11-12, and 13-18. Recommendations are provided for each age range, including for children and adolescents who are catching up on recommended vaccinations and those with health conditions that may increase their risk for serious diseases.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Disease prevention, Guidelines, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Immunization

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2012. Identifying mental health and substance use problems of children and adolescents: A guide for child-serving organizations. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 213 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is geared toward those working in child-serving organizations and the families of children and adolescents (from birth through age 22) being served, promotes the early identification of children and adolescents with mental health and substance use problems and provides guidance, tools, and resources for early identification. The guide addresses the approaches, methods, and strategies used to identify mental health and substance use problems in high-risk children and adolescents. The guide also discusses understanding the identification process and tools, key steps of early identification, and partnering for resources.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA 12-4670.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Child mental health, Children, Collaboration, Costs, Early intervention, Families, High risk groups, Infant mental health, Infants, Mental health, Resource materials, Substance abuse, Treatment, Young adults

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2012. Supportive school discipline: A snapshot from Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiatives. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about supportive school discipline—defined as a systemic constellation of programs and practices that promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky ones. The report discusses cross-agency partnerships, data-driven decisions, system-wide use of evidence-based programs and practices, and engagement of parents and families as partners. For each topic, examples are provided for specific school districts. A case study of one child who benefited from supportive school discipline is also provided.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Discipline, Families, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Parents, Prevention, Programs, Schools

Smith K, Colman S. 2012. Evaluation of adolescent pregnancy prevention approaches: Design of the impact study—Final report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 80 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this final report is to describe the impact study component of the Evaluation of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Approaches—a response to persistent concerns about the consequences of adolescent sexual activity. The purpose of this 8-year (2008-2016) evaluation is to expand available evidence on effective ways to prevent and reduce pregnancy and related sexual risk behaviors among U.S. adolescents. The report provides an overview of the impact evaluation, including its policy context and goals, selection and key features of program models and sites, the impact study design, and the approach to estimating impacts and reporting results. The report also provides information on the seven individual sites to be evaluated and on the program model, evaluation design, and analytic approach for each site.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Evaluation, High risk adolescents, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Research

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.