Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

American College of Medical Genetics. n.d.. Hearing loss, genetics, and your child. Bethesda, MD: American College of Medical Genetics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information for parents of children with hearing loss. The brochure discusses genetics and hearing loss; insurance and paying for genetic testing; what parents should do once hearing loss has been diagnosed; why it is important for children with hearing loss to be seen by a geneticist; how to prepare for the genetics appointment; and what happens at the appointment.

Contact: American College of Medical Genetics, 7220 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 718-9603 Fax: (301) 718-9604 E-mail: acmg@acmg.net Web Site: http://www.acmg.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Genes, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Genetic services, Genetics, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infants

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. n.d.. Hearing loss fact sheet. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about hearing loss in children. It explains what hearing loss in children is; discusses some signs of hearing loss, what causes it, and whether it can be prevented; and what parents can do it they suspect that their child has hearing loss. The fact sheet is printed in English on one side and in Spanish on the other.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Heath services, Infant development, Infants, Prevention, Spanish language materials

Association of Public Health Laboratories. (2013). Newborn screening: Four facts policymakers need to know. Silver Spring, MD: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 14 pp.

Annotation: This bochure describes the importance of newborn screening in the early detection of heritable and genetic conditions that may otherwise be hidden in infancy or early childhood. It outlines the history of newborn screening in the United States in the past 50 years, the importance of blood-spot samples from every newborn being screened by a laboratory, the public health success of newborn screening, the economic benefits of early detection of conditions, the success of pre-discharge hearing and heart screening, and the importance of evolving and improving newborn screening. The brochure contains tables describing the most common disorders screened for and partners in the screening process. It also provides several vignettes of people who were diagnosed with various conditions and were able to lead healthy lives because their conditions could be treated if diagnosed early.

Contact: Association of Public Health Laboratories, 8515 Georgia Avenue, Suite 700 , Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-2745 Secondary Telephone: (240) 485-2747 Fax: (240) 485-2700 E-mail: scott.becker@aphl.org Web Site: http://www.aphl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blood tests, Genetic screening, Hearing tests, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Screening tests

National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. 2011. Early hearing detection and intervention: Website resource guide. Logan, UT: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about and examples of critical components of high-quality websites that support early hearing detection and intervention (EDHI). The guide is designed to increase EDHI administrators' knowledge about key elements of effective websites. The guide also helps administrators work with partners, particularly those that design, develop, and market their sites. The guide includes information about the importance of creating standards-compliant sites that are accessible to those with disabilities. Topics include content, design and layout, key components, and marketing and management. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah Sate University, 2615 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Design, Diagnosis, Disabilities, Early intervention, Graphic design, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Marketing, Resource materials, Screening, Standards, World wide web

Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. [2010]. Strategic plan: 2011-2015. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan for 2011-2015 discusses overarching goals and priorities for the Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. For each priority, strategies and performance measures are described.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, Arizona, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Female adolescents, Health services, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Injury prevention, Obesity, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Transition to independent living, Women's health

National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. 2010-. A resource guide for early hearing detection and intervention. Logan, UT: National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention,

Annotation: This e-book discusses the foundation and evolution of early hearing detection and intervention, newborn hearing screening, tracking and follow-up, assessment of young children, parent counseling in the Internet age, assistive devices, early intervention, family support and cultural competence, quality assurance and improvement, financing and sustainability, information management, and early childhood screening. Chapters can be downloaded individually and will be updated as needed. The book can also be obtained on CD. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah State University, 2880 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 E-mail: mail@infanthearing.org Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org/tas/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early intervention, Family support, Financing, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infants, Parent education, Parents, Quality assurance, Young children

Wisconsin Newborn Screening Program. 2005. These tests could save your baby's life!. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of newborns provides information about newborn screening conducted to detect hidden disorders. The brochure explains what newborn screening is, how it is done, and its purpose. The brochure also discusses what hidden disorders are, why screening is important, whether parents can elect not to have their infant screened, screening costs, what happens to blood samples, whether infants can be screening for other disorders, and where to go for more information. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-1293 Fax: (608) 262-3257 Web Site: http://www.slh.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer information materials, Disorders, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infant health, Neonatal screening, Screening tests, Spanish language materials

Vermont Department of Health, Division of Health Improvement. 2004. Can my baby hear?: Information for families about newborn hearing screening. Burlington, VT: Vermont Department of Health, Division of Health Improvement, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents describes the need for hearing screening in newborn infants, how hearing loss impacts infant and child development, what techniques are used, and how results are interpreted.

Contact: Vermont Department of Health, Division of Health Improvement, 108 Cherry Street, P.O. Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 865-1333 Secondary Telephone: (800) 660-4427 Web Site: http://healthvermont.gov/admin/hi/hi.aspx Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Consumer education materials, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, Vermont

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. 2003. When a newborn doesn't pass the hearing screening: How medical and other health professionals can help increase the number of infants who return for a follow-up evaluation. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 10 pp. (NIDCD fact sheet)

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward health professionals, discusses the common problem of failure to return for a follow-up examination among infants who are identified with hearing loss. The report aims to provide information to reduce the extent of this problem. The report addresses the following issues: (1) why don't some parents return for a follow-up examination? and (2) what all parents need to know before the leave the hospital. A list of free publications from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders is included, as are lists of resources for parents of a child with hearing loss, support services, general information and referral services, communication options, and clinical studies. The document is also available from the Web site in Spanish.

Contact: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Information Clearinghouse, One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456, Telephone: (800) 241-1044 Secondary Telephone: (800) 241-1055 Fax: (301) 770-8977 E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infant health, Parents, Spanish language materials

Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory. 2003. Health professionals guide to newborn screening. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is geared toward health professionals, is designed to help readers comply with Wisconsin's statute requiring newborn screening. The guide provides information about the test panel and newborn screening timeline, when and how to collect a blood specimen, specimen handling and mailing, laboratory testing and reporting, treatment centers and where to go for more information, newborn screening disorders, newborn hearing screening, newborn screening statute WS.253.13, newborn screening funding, the Wisconsin newborn screening advisory group, and newborn screening program administration.

Contact: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-1293 Fax: (608) 262-3257 Web Site: http://www.slh.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Hearing screening, Legislation, Neonatal screening, Screening tests, Wisconsin

White KR, Behrens TR, eds. 1993. The Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Project: Implications for universal newborn hearing screening. Seminars in Hearing. 14(1):1-122 + 3.5 inch IBM compatible data disk. February 1993,

Annotation: This issue of "Seminars in Hearing" summarizes the procedures and current results of the Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Project (RIHAP) which was designed to systematically evaluate the feasibility, validity and cost efficiency of using a recently introduced technique, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), to screen infants for hearing loss. It discusses the implications from RIHAP for policy and practice related to neonatal hearing screening. Self-assessment questions follow each article to allow the reader to review the material. The issue includes a computer disk which contains supplementary information, such as otoacoustic emissions (OAE) applications software, to assist readers understand the material presented in the articles. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Thieme Medical Publishers, 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, Telephone: (212) 760-0888 Fax: (212) 947-1112 E-mail: info@thieme.com Web Site: http://www.thieme.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Early intervention, Hearing disorders, Hearing tests, Infants, Professional education, Screening

Sturner R, Heller J. 1993. Simultaneous screening for hearing, speech, and language. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 9 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 4)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar June 24, 1993. One project goal was developing a time-efficient and cost-effective test for simultaneously screening speech, language, and hearing in young children. Another goal was developing a standard screening tool for predicting the developmental status of preschool children. The report discusses developing and testing the project prototype, components of the simultaneous screening test, and study design and methodology. It ends with comments and reaction to the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Developmental screening, Hearing screening, Language development, MCH research, Preschool children, Screening tests, Speech development

Bess FH, Hall JW III, eds. 1992. Screening children for auditory function. Nashville, TN: Bill Wilkerson Center Press, 539 pp.

Annotation: This book contains state-of the-art information on early identification of auditory dysfunction in children which was presented at the International Symposium on screening children for Auditory Function. The topics are: (1) some of the critical problems involved in screening children; (2) issues, techniques, and model programs associated with newborn screening; (3) and (4) issues concerned with screening preschool and school age children; and (5) intervention issues and strategies appropriate for children with hearing loss. The book also contains appendices, references, an author index, and a subject index. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Bill Wilkerson Center, 1114 19th Avenue, South, Nashville, TN 37212, Telephone: (615) 320-5353 Secondary Telephone: (615) 340-5711 Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-9631439-0-5.

Keywords: Audiologists, Audiology, Early intervention, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, High risk infants, Newborn infants, Otitis media, School age children

Sturner R. 1992. Simultaneous Screening for Hearing, Speech, and Language [Final report]. Durham, NC: Duke University Medical Center, 111 pp.

Annotation: This continuation project followed successful completion of a 3-year project originally designed for 5 years. The overall goals were to (1) develop a means of screening for speech, language, and hearing problems in a child health setting, using no more time than is ordinarily committed to hearing screening alone; and (2) improve current hearing screening procedures in order to be more sensitive to a wider range of audiologic impairments than is possible by routine pure tone screening. The project developed a prototype system called the Pediatric Communication Screening System (PCSS). The system shows clear potential as an efficient means to screen for hearing, articulation, and language. Large scale validation studies of representative populations are still needed to define cut off points for prediction of speech, language and hearing outcomes. In addition, replication of these studies would be needed to confirm findings. It is hoped that after these projects, the Pediatric Communication Screening System could be recommended for clinical use. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-105889.

Keywords: Hearing disorders, Hearing tests, Language disorders, Preschoolers, Screening, Speech disorders

Gans D. 1989. Improving Auditory Testing of Multihandicapped Children [Final report]. Kent, OH: Kent State University , 223 pp.

Annotation: This project's goals were to evaluate and improve the auditory testing techniques used with severely and profoundly multihandicapped (S/PMH) children, and longitudinally investigate the auditory development of S/PMH children. Evidence was found that indicated the traditional methods and interpretive techniques used in testing the hearing of S/PMH children should be modified to best serve this population. The popular method of testing, as used with nonhandicapped infants and young children, requires modifications in the way the tests are performed and in the way results are interpreted when applied to S/PMH individuals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB90-147471.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiometry, Auditory Brainstem Evoked Response, Hearing Tests, Noise-Tone Difference Testing

Mencher GT. 1972 (ca.). Report of a visit to Israel and Yugoslavia, July 15-October 9, 1972 under the Exchange of Experts Program. [Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska] , 49 pp.

Harrington DA. 1963. Services for the child who is hard of hearing: A guide for the development of programs. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 38 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 402-1963)

Annotation: This publication is a revised edition of a guide drafted for members of the Children's Bureau staff to be used in consulting with states that were developing programs in audiology. This publication contains suggested principles which have been selected from a number of sources and reviewed by specialists in the field of audiology as well as those in allied fields. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library

Keywords: Children, Deafness, Diagnosis, Hearing aids, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests

Lesser AJ. [1949?]. Services for the child who is hard of hearing: A guide for the development of programs. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Children's Bureau, 27 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 334)

Annotation: This publication is a revised edition of a guide drafted for members of the Children's Bureau staff to be used in consulting with states that were developing programs in audiology. This publication contains suggested principles which have been selected from a number of sources and reviewed by specialists in the field of audiology as well as those in allied fields. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children's Bureau, Deafness, Diagnosis, Hearing aids, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.